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This is The Digital Story Podcast #720, Jan. 7, 2020. Today's theme is "Live from CES 2020." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Many trade shows these days seem to be fighting an uphill battle, but not CES Las Vegas. The town is hopping with tech vendors and buyers from all over the world. And for us, as photographers and technology lovers, there's plenty to unpack. Today I'll highlight some of my favorite discoveries during the media events prior to show opening at the Convention Center. So, hide your credit cards and join me here in Sin City.

Live from CES 2020 Las Vegas

Las-Vegas-Night-1024-2.jpg

We're taking the mic on the road and filing a field report from CES Las Vegas. I take you inside the halls of one of our media events, then afterward share some of my favorite discoveries during the press previews before the show.

I discuss the SmartMike+ by Sabinetek, the Cobra SC 400 Dash Cam, the Smacircle e-bike, the Nikon D780, and the Kingston Canvas Select Plus 64GB SD card. Tune in to learn about all of them.

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I still mount manual focus Nikkors on my aging, but more than serviceable Nikon D700. I keep the DSLR in the studio for testing optics for TheFilmCameraShop (typically 35mm analog Nikons such as the wonderful FG) and for using on my mirrorless cameras as well.

IMG_5700.jpg Nikon D700 with Series E 50mm f/1.8 manual focus lens. Photos by Derrick Story.

The only problem, as with practically every digital AF camera, is that the viewfinder screen isn't really designed for manually focusing lenses. Yes, we do have digital focus assist, which I like, but not those wonderful micro prism collars that I love.

So I decided to take a chance on replacing the factory screen with a 3rd party option that's better designed for older glass. (I bought my replacement from Terences Camera that has all sorts of screens and adapters for a variety of cameras.) This should have been a no-brainer for me. I change focusing screens all the time on 35mm film cameras, and I rarely screw things up. But for some reason, I was a bit more nervous about operating on a digital SLR, especially transplanting a $30 screen that was shipped directly from China.

IMG_5705.jpg

I was, however, determined to attempt this procedure. So I found the installation instructions online and prepared for surgery.

The Double 45 Degree Split Image Focusing Screen that I bought from Terences Camera was nicely packed in its own little box with a microfiber cloth, padded tweezers, and little latex finger cots. (I think they were for Chinese fingers, however, because I could barely get the second one over my thumb.) I kept the Rocket Blaster handy in case I spotted any dust during the transplant.

IMG_5704.jpg The new focusing screen installed in the D700.

The original Nikon screen popped out easily once I found the spring latch. I removed it from the mirror box with the cute little padded tweezers (forceps?), and safely stored it, just in case I needed to return to factory settings someday in the future. I then inserted the split image screen, swung the hinged frame upward until I heard the secure click of the latch. "Close her up!" I proudly exclaimed to the surgical assistant as I pulled off my latex finger cots. (Actually, my cat was the only other living creature in the room at the time, and she just wanted her dinner.)

Now for the post-op test. I mounted a Nikon Series E 50mm f/1.8 and looked through the viewfinder. "Not bad," I thought. I focused without manual assist on subjects both near and far, then uploaded the RAW files to Capture One on my Mac for close examination. "These look quite good," I thought, sounding like a surgeon surveying X-rays on a light box.

The images were all crisp and focused just as I had intended. While shooting with the D700, I had used all the different focusing aids on the screen: diagonal split view, micro prism collar, and the matte surface. The results looked great.

The procedure was successful. Even though this wasn't a top of the line screen at a premium price, it was more than serviceable, and exactly what I had been looking for.

It's now even more enjoyable to use some of my favorite Nikon MF optics on the D700, such as the 105mm f/2.5. I have CPU data profiles set up for all the lenses, so the camera works great in Aperture Priority mode, and I get basic metadata as well.

I don't think I will convert my D610 because it's mostly an AF camera for me, and I would be even more nervous about the procedure. (BTW: the replacement screen does not compromise AF functionality, however.) But I will probably use the D700 more now thanks to the modification. The screen really does change things. It's like a cool hybrid shooter that focuses like a 35mm camera, but renders digital files.

All in all, a successful operation.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

CES 2020 Preview

CES Las Vegas is right around the corner, and I anticipate a good year at the show with many, many tech announcements. I'll have a full report from the event on Tuesday's TDS Photography Podcast. But let's take a moment first to ponder what I'll probably see at the show.

DSCF0878.jpg

Here are some of the things that are on my radar.

  • New DSLR announcement from Nikon. Most likely the D780 full frame.
  • DJI has something up its sleeve that we will hear about.
  • Lots of 5G news from the mobile sector.
  • Electric bikes and scooters are really going to come into their own this year.
  • Smart homes are going to have to get secure, and that assurance will be their focus.
  • A ton of evolution in the automotive sector, from self-driving to all electric.
  • Folding phones to clever laptops and tablets.
  • Television news, of course.

I'll start my reporting on Sunday night, Jan. 5. The podcast will publish on Monday night, Jan. 6. Stay tuned!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #719, Dec. 31, 2019. Today's theme is "Managing the Art/Life Balance." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

My hope is that the lessons that I've learned over the past decade will provide a strong start to the next. One area of particular importance is deciding how to use the resources that are available to me. Whether it's my business, my craft, or my personal life, learning how to skillfully reinvest in those areas is a top priority for 2020. Today, we'll take a closer look at the unique challenges that artists face with this balancing act.

Managing the Art/Life Balance

Humboldt_Mike-11.jpg

Before we get to the Art Part of the equation, let's talk about life in general, and the options available to us. Is the goal to make as much money as possible? How do they balance the acquisition of possessions vs experiences? And how much risk can they live with along the way?

I've always found that it's easiest to take a big challenge and break it into parts to make it feel more manageable. The biggest challenge of all, day-to-day happiness, falls into these five categories for me.

  • Time - Managing sleep vs waking hours, labor vs creativity, work vs personal life.
  • Energy - Health is a key factor and plays an important role in the amount of time that's available to us. Good health equals more energy.
  • Money - Short term capital that's liquid and available to spend.
  • Assets - Longer term capital that provides relative security as we navigate the ups and downs of daily life.
  • Well Being - The result of finding the right balance of the above factors.

Why Artists are Unique

Now let's get to the Art Part.

Artists have an additional layer to contend with. If you're not an artist, you may be satisfied with a good job, happy relationship, and reasonable health. An artist, on top of those things, needs to create. This activity often requires both tools and time. Adding this layer to an already challenging life is an art in itself.

Here are five things to keep in mind along the way.

  • Do make time for your craft. Life will pull you in different directions. And others might not value your creative pursuits as much as you do. As long as you keep things in balance, learn to ignore statements such as, "Derrick loves to play with his cameras." and things like that.
  • Don't over-emphasize tools. Cameras and lenses are necessary in the right amount. But experiences using those tools are just as valuable, if not more so.
  • Don't be weird. Overly inward, non-communicative, odd behavior is off-putting to others. And you never really know where your next opportunity lies. Take interest in other peoples' lives, even if it's not your cup of tea.
  • You don't need to be rich, but you do need to pay your bills. Beware of over-extending your assets in the name of art. Make sure you focus on generating enough money to meet your budget, even if it requires some mundane activities.
  • Nourish your friends and family. As much as we would love to immerse in our passions in our free time, sometimes you need to help the kids with their homework, accompany your partner to the grocery store, and call your mom.

As you've probably figured out by now, reinvesting in your craft is really managing your resources in life overall. By maintaining our health, paying attention to those around us, and by responsibly allocating assets to our artistic endeavors extends our ability to enjoy the rewards of creativity.

May your New Year be fueled by the lessons you've learned from the past. Happy 2020 my friends!

We Now Have a Secure Server for TDS

Even though we don't handle transactions on thedigitalstory, we moved the site to a secure server that now uses https instead of http. In large part, we undertook this project because of the mail I received from concerned visitors who saw "Not Secure" in the URL bar of certain browsers.

All along, I've assured folks that nothing bad was going to happen as a result. But, things got to the point where it was better to make the change.

You can thank our Inner Circle Members for this upgrade. Their contributions paid for the project.

The TDS 2020 Photography Workshop Season

What makes these events so special? It's the magic blend of fellowship, location, inspiration, and focus. You can actually be single-minded about your craft. I'll take care of everything else.

When I was discussing this on our Patreon site, one Inner Circle member raised a concern about the class presentation on the final day. I'm going to tell you what I say at every workshop. This is not a competition. It is the most supportive creative environment that you will ever share your work with. And no matter your skill level, the floor is yours to discuss your experience and share a few images. I promise you, you will love it.

When you decide which event is best for your, jump over to our 2020 Workshops Signup Page and place a $100 deposit to secure your place. Only participants on the Reserve List who have placed a deposit will be eligible to register for a workshop. If you have questions or need more information, fill out the "Send Me Info!" request form. I'll get back to you asap.

  • LA Street Photography Experience - March 13-15, 2020 - This hands-on workshop guides you on an exploration of classic Los Angeles locations and architecture. Our excursions will take us as far west as Venice Beach, as well as famous movie spots and the back streets of this fascinating Southern California area. Limited to 9 participants and featuring two instructors (Derrick Story and Mike Boening), you will enjoy great photography, food, and friendship with our fellow enthusiasts. Three days, $749. You can place your deposit here.
  • Humboldt Redwoods and Coast Workshop - May 12-14, 2020 - Our home base for this experience is in the hospitable town of Fortuna that's on the banks of the Eel River. From there we explore the magnificent redwood groves of Humboldt County and the rugged coastline of Northern California. This workshop explores three distinct ecosystems in a satisfying 3-day event. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • Lassen Volcanic Park Photo Workshop - July 16-18, 2020 - We'll convene at a spacious cabin at Lake Almanor that serves as our HQ. From there we explore the stunning Lassen landscape, peaceful shores of Lake Almanor, and the magnificent mountain night skies. This hands-on photo workshop is limited to 8 participants and is a wonderful blending of experience, camaraderie, and artistry. Limited to just 8 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.
  • The Eastern Sierra Photography Workshop - Autumn 2020 - Our event is headquartered at the Silver Maple Inn in Bridgeport, CA - gateway to Bodie, Mono Lake, and June Lake. We'll take advantage of the magical morning light to photograph some of the most unique landscape in North America. We'll photograph the sparkling night skies of the Sierra and explore rustic urban environments. Limited to just 9 participants, you can reserve your spot and learn more about this event here.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

If it's time to relocate your Aperture images to Lightroom, this new app might be just the solution that you've been waiting for.

Avalanche is designed to convert catalogs of photographs from one application to another while keeping the organizational structures intact, ensuring all metadata flows without losses, and that image adjustments are replicated with the best possible results.

browser-transfer.jpg

Avalanche for Lightroom, the first version of Avalanche, focuses on providing a solution for photographers with photos stuck in Apple Aperture that isn't supported anymore by Apple. Since the release of Catalina, Aperture users can't rely on launching Aperture anymore to access their photo libraries. Avalanche allows a smooth transfer of the libraries towards other applications - today toward Lightroom or folders, and soon including other apps like Luminar and Capture One Pro.

"We designed Avalanche because we were not satisfied by the existing solutions to migrate our many photo catalogs out of Aperture." said Matthieu Kopp, CYME co-founder and CTO. "We realized that being able to switch our preferred cataloging/app was important as many great photo edition apps exist in this space. Being able to move all our images with metadata, organisation structure, and some edits was opening new perspectives and giving us a much wanted freedom of choice."

But Avalanche does not stop here. "We wanted to ensure that everything that was present in the source catalog was converted, even if it looked hard or impossible. Therefore Avalanche converts Faces and recreates them, not as keywords like other solutions do, but as real face detections in the destination catalog."

"Avalanche not only does a great job at opening and converting those catalogs, but we added some unique Machine Learning capabilities to transfer a number of adjustments. And when Avalanche estimates that a picture has adjustments that are too complex to migrate, it places the image in a dedicated album for the user to review after conversion."

Avalanche Features

  • Browser interface to easily find all catalogs on all connected volumes.
  • User friendly conversion screen with detailed information about the content to be converted and detailed progress monitoring.
  • Detailed reporting screen and a conversion log in the form of a CSV file to easily find out what errors were encountered (missing files, corrupted database situations...
  • Aperture Masters and Versions copies are fully converted into masters and virtual copies in Lightroom.
  • Videos and video versions are fully converted into master videos and virtual copies in Lightroom.
  • Albums: simple albums are recreated in the target catalog. Smart albums are not converted.
  • Face definitions and face detections are fully converted in Lightroom.
  • All customs annotations, flags, ratings, color labels are converted.
  • Keywords are converted with full support for hierarchies.
  • All IPTC and EXIF metadata is supported. Avalanche even harvests EXIF data from the master files to enrich the target catalog.
  • Projects, Folders, Stacks are recreated in Lightroom.
  • AI powered adjustments: WB temperature and tint, exposure, contrast, vibrancy, saturation, black and white levels, highlights and shadows are converted using Machine Learning (ML).
  • Curves are converted.
  • Images converted to black and white are properly migrated and ML is used to infer the proper color mix from color space to black and white.
  • Conversion options letting you decide how to handle referenced files, videos, etc...
  • The choice of folder hierarchy for the copied master files.

System Requirements

Avalanche for Lightroom requires macOS 10.14 or later and runs fine on Catalina. You'll need around 145 MB of free space, 4 GB of memory (8 GB is recommended) and enough space to accommodate the converted libraries. A working copy of Apple Aperture is NOT required to migrate Aperture libraries as Avalanche opens those libraries natively.

Visit the Avalanche home page for more information, trial version, or to purchase for $59.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The latest update to Pixelmator Pro (v. 1.5.4 Avalon) includes ML Super Resolution. And it's fantastic.

super-Rez.jpg Image already enhanced using ML Super Resolution.

I took this feature for a test spin with a product shot of a Nikon F that measured 2400 x 1733 pixels. I opened the image in Pixelmator Pro and applied ML Super Resolution, then exported the shot as a Jpeg. The resampled image measured 7200 x 5199 pixels, and it looked better than the original. Here are the comparison shots.

original-shot.jpg Original image at 2400 x 1733 pixels.

super-rez-version.jpg Super Resolution version at 7200 x 5199 pixels.

Instead of using just "nearest neighbor" upscaling, Pixelmator uses machine learning to take into account additional elements in the image such as textures and patterns.

The speed of the process varies depending on your hardware. If you have a current Mac that can tap Core ML 3 and multi-GPU support, then the resampling takes just seconds. But if you have an older machine, such as my mid-2014 MBP, it still works, but takes much longer. There was a big time difference between my current iMac and aging laptop.

Regardless of processing time, it's worth the wait. The results were truly impressive. Suddenly, I'm thinking about additional opportunities for my 12 MP Nikon D700...

Pixelmator Pro is available in the Mac App Store for $39.99. It was a great value prior to ML Super Resolution.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #718, Dec. 17, 2019. Today's theme is "Is Capture One Pro 20 the Logical Alternative to Lightroom?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Among all the camera discounts and holiday hub-bub this December, there was some software news as well. Phase One released a major update to its photo management app, Capture One Pro 20. What's interesting about this latest version is that it's aimed squarely at disenchanted Lightroom photographers. Is it truly to logical alternative to Adobe products? I'll explore the possibilities on today's TDS podcast.

Is Capture One Pro 20 the Logical Alternative to Lightroom?

When I look at some of the refinements in Capture One Pro 20, no doubt they are hoping to lure a few Lightroom users their way. Things like the simplified color panel, more friendly crop tool, and even a keyboard shortcut change that matches Lightroom for switching from a single photo to thumbnails (G).

C1p20-LR-Import.jpg

But is Capture One Pro the logical alternative? Let's take a look at five strengths of each application, then resume this discussion.

Capture One Pro 20 Strengths

  • RAW Processing. The hands down winner IMHO.
  • Layers and luminosity masks, so easy, so powerful.
  • Fully configurable workspaces - very customizable
  • Outstanding color tools, especially for portrait work.
  • Almost magical exposure controls, especially Contrast, Highlights, and Shadows.

Lightroom Strengths

  • HDR and panorama processing.
  • Cloud integration with outstanding mobile apps.
  • More training, 3rd party plugins, bigger ecosystem.
  • Price. Yes, believe it or not, I think Lightroom is more affordable.
  • Better integration with Photoshop and the entire Adobe ecosystem.

So if you're dissatisfied with Lightroom, the place to start is why are you looking to change?

If it's price, then you might want to stick with Lightroom. Capture One Perpetual license is $299. And let's say that I upgrade every other version. So to upgrade from version 11 is $199. So this investment should last me 48 month, provided that I only upgrade every other year. And the price still works out to $10.35 a month.

If I go with the subscription plan for C1P, which keeps me current through all the version, that will cost me $20 a month if I pay monthly, or $180 a year if I pay all at once. Again more costly than the $10 a month I'm currently paying for Lightroom, Photoshop, and LR Mobile.

If speed is your issue, I don't think you'll really be any happier with Capture One Pro. I never really notice a difference working on one app or the other.

So which one you use will most likely come down to features. In my case, I like the library management better in Capture One, not to mention the RAW processing.

But, I also have Lightroom for my panoramas, cloud connectivity, and HDR processing.

If I had to choose just one, I would pick Capture One Pro. But I'm glad that I don't have to do that. Because there are a lot of things that I like about Lightroom as well.

Adobe Photoshop for iPad gets AI-powered Select Subject feature

You can read the entire article here on DP Review.

At launch, Adobe said more powerful features would be added over time and back in November the company Adobe provided more detail on timelines and features that are to come.

As promised, the AI-powered Select Subject feature which lets you isolate objects in the scene from the background has now been made available. In most cases, a selection can be made just with one tap, even if the subject has a complex outline. In a second step filters or other edits can be applied to either the isolated subject or the background.

Adobe says the function works and performs on the same level as for the desktop version, despite the iPad's processing limitations. Machine learning was used to train the tool's algorithms using a wide range of objects and scenes but the company says it is still working on optimization for difficult subjects like hair or fur.

Additionally, the app has been updated with faster cloud upload and download some user interface tweaks. More information is available on the Adobe website.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

LA Street Photography Experience - This 3-day event on March 13-15 is going to be exciting. If you want to join Mike and me this coming March, just visit the information and registration page, or go to www.thenimblephotographer.com and click on the Workshops link, or go to the Olympus site - no matter how you get there, Mike and I are looking forward to working with you this coming Spring.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS - Learn everything you need to know about Photos for the Mac and iPad by checking out my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. This course is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. (The Digital Story is supported by its audience. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.) And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

Affiliate Links - The links to some products in this podcast contain an affiliate code that credits The Digital Story for any purchases made from B&H Photo and Amazon via that click-through. Depending on the purchase, we may receive some financial compensation.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes for creators, entrepreneurs, and curious people everywhere. Get two months of learning for free by visiting www.skillshare.com/tds.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

iPadOS has changed a lot of things for photographers who use Apple tools. Now we have a robust Photos app on the iPad, including tools for editing videos that we don't have on the Mac. I'm serious. Take a look at this short movie to see what I'm talking about.

Why it's better to edit video on an iPad than your Mac from Photos for macOS Catalina Essential Training by Derrick Story

Sure we have lots of video editing options for both platforms. But in this case, that's not the point. If you're an iPhone-toting photographer connected to iCloud, then when you record video with your smartphone, it's right there in the ecosystem waiting for you.

You don't have to transfer it to another app or platform; just open Photos for iPadOS, click on your movie, then adjust exposure, white balance, crop, straighten, and even apply filters. The adjustments are non-destructive and the completed work is available on all your devices via iCloud. It's really slick.

How to Watch Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS

This is just one of the many cool topics that I cover in my latest course on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com. Photos for macOS Catalina and iPadOS is perfect for Mac and iPad based photographers who shoot with iPhone, Mirrorless, and DSLR cameras. It covers both photography and movies. And if I say so myself, it's a lot of fun.

videos-iPadOS.jpg

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

One of my favorite compact cameras, the Fujifilm XF10 doesn't have an optical or electronic viewfinder. I compose off the LCD screen. Most of the time this is just fine. But how about those times (can you say bright, sunny day?) when life would be better with a viewfinder? Take a look at this.

finder-on-bottom.jpg Optical viewfinder attached to the bottom of the camera using the tripod socket.

Since the XF10 doesn't have a hot shoe (because it does have a built-in flash), the tripod socket becomes the best non-destructive way to attach a viewfinder. At this point you're probably saying, "But Derrick, it's on the bottom of the camera!" Indeed it is, and it hasn't made a lick of difference to me while shooting.

PC130527.jpg The parts needed for my DIY viewfinder assembly.

In real life, I shoot with the LCD when I can. If I need more, I just attach the optical viewfinder and look through it when needed. Because the top of the XF10 is flat, I can just set it on the table upside down.

PC130521.jpg

For this project, I've repurposed an Olympus VF-1 optical finder that has frame lines for a 34mm lens. But you can use any viewfinder that you can find, as long as it fits in a hot shoe or has a tripod socket. In my case, I attached a cold shoe to the camera's tripod socket, then I just slide the viewfinder in as needed.

For 28mm shots I compose outside of the frame lines. When I have the XF10 set to 35mm focal length, the frame lines are a perfect match. And I to have the LCD right there if I need it for reference.

I wouldn't use this rig for close up work because of parallax, but for general portrait and travel photography, it works great.

Who ever said that the viewfinder had to be on top? And if it does, then just turn the camera upside down and shoot that way.

PC130522.jpg Or, just turn it upside down.

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It's something that practically all photographers have... somewhere. Yes, the "easy to lose" but really useful remote controller device. And now is the time to find it.

The holiday season is perfect for long exposures of interior decorations (hopefully with a little bokeh for flavor), group shots that you are actually a part of, and weird camera positions where you're on your tiptoes to see what's on the LCD screen. And these all are easier with a remote release.

There are two basic ways to go here. First, dig through the sock drawer and find the IR release designed for your camera, check the battery, then put it in your backpack or wherever you keep your gear. While you're at it, you might want to take a minute to refresh on how to use it and where the settings are. People hate waiting for fumbling photographers.

The second option is to use the mobile app for your camera that always has a remote control feature. Again, now is the time to set it up and practice before you gather a room full of people.

Either way, you want to be ready to go for when the moment strikes. Self-timers are nice, but remote control is a much better look.

Happy Holidays!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.