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The Keystone correction tool can be found in the Capture One's Lens Correction tab, and it's definitely worth a look. It makes it easy to straighten both vertical and horizontal converging lines - the types of distortion that we often encounter when photographing buildings from ground level.

Generally speaking, I use it to correct vertical lines. In this short movie, you can see exactly how it works.

Straighten lines with Keystone Correction from Capture One Pro 11 Essential Training by Derrick Story

Not only does this tool work well, it's not difficult to figure it out. And just like everything else in Capture One Pro, it's non-destructive. So you can go back at any time to readjust the picture. And by using it, you can correct an everyday snapshot (such as the iPhone shot below) into a pretty nice photograph.

keystone-correction.png

This video is from my new course titled, Capture One Pro 11 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. You can also tune in on lynda.com if you prefer your training there. Either way, I have four hours of entertaining education that will help you master this excellent photo management and editing application.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #632, April 24, 2018. Today's theme is "Postcard Gravity." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

In my previous life as a cubical worker, we used to have this term for high-flying good ideas that were eventually pulled back to earth to meet their inevitable demise. We called this phenomenon, "corporate gravity." And believe it or not, it has an artistic sibling for photographers that I call that "postcard gravity." And the battle against it is the subject of today's show.

Postcard Gravity

Engaging in personal projects is one of the ways we can save our artistic souls as photographers. There are no bosses, committees, focus groups, or editors to shoot down our ideas. We come up with a concept, photograph it, then determine how we feel about its merits.

friends-maui-1024.jpg "Fishing, Lahaina" - Kodak ColorPlus 200 film - From the Maui Series by Derrick Story.

But sooner or later, even our personal projects find themselves in front of others for their opinions. And how many times have you heard them thinking, "Why can't you just take a pretty picture and leave it at that?"

To help you battle Postcard Gravity, I have five techniques that I'm going to share with you right now.

  • Be clear on the concept of the project. Art for art's sake can lead you down some very weird alleys. But if you've thought through your project from start to finish, you have a better opportunity of creating something truly unique, and possible even appealing to the masses.
  • Leverage all of your technical expertise. By combining craftsmanship and artistry, you can impress viewers who might not initially grasp the concept, but appreciate your skill.
  • It's OK to explain what you're doing. You're asking a lot of your audience to perceive in seconds an idea that took you days, or even weeks to perfect. By letting your viewers know something like, "I wanted to create a very graphical look," helps them understand what you're doing.
  • Don't argue with critical feedback. It doesn't do any good.
  • But don't discount positive feedback either. This is especially helpful for a gallery of images. If people express a favorite, then consider showcasing it to promote the entire collection.

The main thing is to avoid becoming addicted to sugary likes. Everyone loves a sunset, but generally speaking, that is the artistic work of God, not the photographer.

Thomas Hawk Publishes, "My Thoughts on the SmugMug Flickr Acquisition"

In his Petapixel article, Thomas Hawk writes:

"First off, I have to say that I think that the acquisition news is very good for Flickr users and the Flickr community. While time will tell how this acquisition goes, I have much more faith in SmugMug running Flickr than I do Verizon."

"In buying Flickr, SmugMug more than anything is buying a community. I think that they are going to be very careful not to disrupt this community and look for ways to grow it thoughtfully. Having known the MacAskills (the family that owns SmugMug) for many years, one thing I can say for certain is that they LOVE photography and photographers. If you ever get a chance to visit their offices in Mountain View, do it. What you will find is wall after wall covered with the biggest prints you have ever seen in your life. These are people who are passionate about photography, not advertising."

"For SmugMug, I think what is probably most exciting is that they are getting a very large community of photographers by purchasing Flickr. I think that this will allow them to do even more with community, photowalks, meetups, etc. They will need to make sure Flickr is profitable (and it will be) but they will have a much larger group to build a bigger and stronger community with. While Google+ sort of became a place for the photographic community for a bit, before Google largely abandoned it, there really is not a good place for a larger community of photographers today and I think with the acquisition of Flickr, SmugMug hopes that it can build this and I think they have a pretty good chance at doing it."

I think both Thomas and I are excited about this announcement.

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Ed is now available on Amazon. If you purchase the book, send me proof, and I'll send you an official book plate that you can print out on a standard 4"x6" sheet of photo paper. This offer is good until April 30, 2018. Use the Contact Form on The Nimble Photographer site. Also, feel free to post a review on Amazon once you've read the book. They're helpful to potential buyers.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Aerial Photography Workshop

Public registration is now open for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Be sure to get on the Reserve List for this one!

Reservation Forms have been sent for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop

We have our cabin reservations secured for Sept. 27-29, 2018 for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop. I sent out reservation forms this last weekend. So if you are on the reserve list, you should have received an invite.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

You could say that it's a crazy hybrid approach to art photography, but it's also convenient with great results. I've been shooting film, having the lab digitize it when it's processed, then printing the images with my inkjet printer using Photos for macOS and Red River Paper card stock. And they look different than anything I've created in the past.

Surfboards, Maui "Surfboards, Maui" Scanned version - Contax 159MM, Zeiss 28-70mm, Kodak ColorPlus 200 film. Photo by Derrick Story.

The workflow is easy. I shoot the film (which is fun in itself) then send it off to the lab for processing and scanning. I don't get lab prints, just the negatives and the scans.

Once everything comes back from the lab, I look at the negatives on a light table. I do this for a couple reasons. First, I can really tell how well I did by looking at the film under the loupe. It's just me, celluloid, and optics. I also check for light leaks and other potential issues that I might need to be aware of with how the camera is working.

I then look at the scans. This is the fun part for me, because it's my first viewing of the images in positive format. As with any film project, sometimes I'm happy, sometimes I'm sad.

I tend not fiddle around with the images much in post production. I want to retain as much of their raw analog quality as possible. If I do have to touch them up, I can use the editing tools in Photos for macOS, or the Luminar 2018 editing extension. Lots of power with these options, and they keep me in my easy workflow.

Then it's time to print. I've been using Red River Paper Matte Card Stock for the output. It's beautiful paper that comes scored, making it easy to fold to 5"x7" finished size. I also purchase my envelopes for the cards at RRP.

surfboads-printed-1024.jpg "Surfboards, Maui" Printed version using Red River Paper card stock and Photos for macOS with an inexpensive Canon wireless printer. Image by Derrick Story.

In my book, The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition, I explain how to use the Card tool in Photos to generate your own fine art greeting cards. All of your work is saved as a project in Photos, so you can go back anytime and pick up where you left off, or print more cards.

For my printer, I used an inexpensive Canon PIXMA Wireless Photo Printer ($69) that couldn't be easier to operate.

As for the final product, these cards look different than anything I've created before. The combination of analog film with modern inkjet technology is truly unique. And the fact that I can manage the entire effort in Photos for macOS keeps it all so very simple.

New Photos for macOS High Sierra Training!

Is it time for you to learn the ins and outs of the latest version of Photos? Take a look at Photos for macOS High Sierra Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning, or on lynda.com. Maximize your iPhone photography and complement the work you do with your mirrorless cameras as well. You'll love your cameras even more...

Also be sure to check out my new book, The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition. It's completely up to date!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There was a time when working with RAW files in a mobile device seemed like a crazy idea. But the processing power of today's handsets like my iPhone X has made this proposition quite feasible. And one of my favorite apps for this task is RAW Power 1.1, just released from Gentlemen Coders.

raw-power-update.PNG RAW Power 1.1 on an iPhone X.

RAW Power brings to iOS the impressive RAW decoding and editing that was formerly only available in Apple's Aperture professional photo application. Using adjustments like Boost, you can improve your images using this powerful core technology. It works great for Jpegs as well. Here's what's new in 1.1:

  • New "RAW Images" Smart Album and ability to filter any album to show just RAWs
  • View complete folder and album hierarchy
  • Export images to Files.app as TIFF-8 and TIFF-16, JPEG, and PNG
  • DPI and Compression preferences
  • Delete image in the single photo view ("1-up")
  • Greatly improved Share features
  • Improved Layout and UI with larger controls
  • "Gear Down" sliders for 10x more precision when adjusting
  • 3D Touch in 1-Up
  • Full-size Curves adjustment in vertical screen mode
  • Show / Hide Thumbnails in Edit
  • Adjustable Thumbnail size in 1-up and Edit
  • Auto-histogram shows and hides itself to avoid covering the image
  • Revert Image feature greatly improved
  • Re-center button for Map

The improved user interface and the clever RAW Images smart album show that Gentlemen Coders is now focusing on our visual experience using the app as well as its under-the-hood muscle. You don't need an iPad to process and enhance your RAW files. I've been taking care of business right there on my iPhone X.

library-mgmt.PNG

RAW Power 1.1 is free to download in the iTunes App Store on your device. I recommend purchasing the one-time in-app purchase, Advanced Adjustments Pack for $4.99 that unlocks Curves and a couple other controls. This software is a great value and a joy to use.


Nimble Photographer Logo

RAW Power 1.1 has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #631, April 17, 2018. Today's theme is "Are There Any Benefits to Watermarking?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A bad watermark is like pimple on the nose of a beautiful person. You want to enjoy the beauty, but all you can see is the pimple. But not all watermarks are bad. And in fact, they can be both tasteful and useful. And the quest to figure all of that out is the subject of today's TDS podcast.

Are There Any Benefits to Watermarking?

Watermarking Pros - They are a simple way to identify the creator of the image. Plus, they can be used as branding opportunities.

TDS-Sunset-Watermark.jpg

However, to create the best experience for your viewer, keep these tips in mind:

  • Consider why you're watermarking in the first place. If it's to prevent theft, you very well could be wasting your time. Services like Pixsy do a better job. Also make sure that your copyright information is in the metadata.
  • If you use a signature as your watermark, make sure it's legible.
  • Be careful with brand building watermarks so that don't clutter up the composition and detract from the image. This is especially true if they contains logos.
  • Position the watermark so it creates the least amount of distraction.
  • Put your watermarks on a separate layer so you can control their use, opacity, and appearance. I published an article on TDS on how to do this with Luminar.

RAW 1.1 Features Lots of Improvements

I've been working with the new iOS version on my iPhone, and I have to say that I'm quite impressed. RAW Power brings to iOS the impressive RAW decoding and editing that was formerly only available in Apple's Aperture professional photo application. Using adjustments like Boost, you can improve your images in ways that simply can't be done in any other application. It works great for Jpegs as well. Here's what's new in 1.1:

  • New "RAW Images" Smart Album and ability to filter any album to show just RAWs
  • View complete folder and album hierarchy
  • Export images to Files.app as TIFF-8 and TIFF-16, JPEG, and PNG
  • DPI and Compression preferences
  • Delete image in the single photo view ("1-up")
  • Greatly improved Share features
  • Improved Layout and UI with larger controls
  • "Gear Down" sliders for 10x more precision when adjusting
  • 3D Touch in 1-Up
  • Full-size Curves adjustment in vertical screen mode
  • Show / Hide Thumbnails in Edit
  • Adjustable Thumbnail size in 1-up and Edit
  • Auto-histogram shows and hides itself to avoid covering the image
  • Revert Image feature greatly improved
  • Re-center button for Map

Aerial Photography Workshop

Public registration is now open for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Sign up today and join us!

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Ed is now available on Amazon. Also, feel free to post a review on Amazon once you've read the book. They're helpful to potential buyers.

Digital Asset Management with Luminar - Nimble Classroom

Even though I have the class scheduled for April 21, I'm going to have to move it back until Skylum releases the gold copy of the DAM. If you've already signed up for the class, I will contact you directly about this. If you want to grab one of the few remaining seats, I would go ahead and do that as well. We will run the class as soon as the software is ready.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Reservation Forms have been sent for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop

We have our cabin reservations secured for Sept. 27-29, 2018 for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop. I sent out reservation forms this last weekend. So if you are on the reserve list, you should have received an invite.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There are many reasons to add (or not to add) a watermark to an image. For most photographers, it's not an everyday activity. But there are times when it's useful for protection or promotion.

new-image-layer.png

If you're finishing your photo in Luminar 2018, here's one way to add the watermark. I like this approach because the graphic lives on a separate layer, so you can turn it off, or on, as needed.

In this case, I'm going to add my Nimble Photographer logo to an image. But you can use this technique for "FPO" when working on publication layouts, "Proof Only" for wedding work, and other related activities.

I usually start with a PNG version because it seems to blend better than Jpegs. In Luminar, I go to Layers, click on the + icon, and choose Add New Image Layer from the popup.

When the image comes in, it will be way too big. But that's not a problem. Go to the Tools popup, choose Free Transform, and tame it. Pay close attention to the proportions of the logo and try to maintain them when using Free Transform. Clicking on the Lock icon in the Info Bar may help you with this. (Keep in mind this locks the proportions to the image you're working on, not the original graphic that you brought in. So lock may or may not be useful. But it's good to know that it's there.)

Once you have the logo the size you want, position it, then click Done. If you want to change the position later, use Free Transform to move it. You can return as many times as you want with this tool.

normal-blending-mode.png The image comes in in "Normal" blending mode, showing its white background. But I would prefer a more subtle approach.

blending-mode.png So I switch to the "Multiply" mode to eliminate the white background.

Make sure that the watermark layer is selected, then go to the blending modes popup and survey your options. For this image, the Multiply option worked great. Play with all of the blending modes and choose the one that works best for your particular shot.

The finishing touch is choosing the right opacity. For a more subtle approach, I pulled opacity down to 40 percent.

40-percent-opacity.png By pulling the opacity down to 40 percent, I can create a more subtle rendering of the watermark.

Be sure to save your work as a Luminar file - File > Save - So you can return to it another time for a different watermark treatment, or none at all. Then make sure your watermark layer is selected, and export the file - File > Export.

Watermark-TDS-1024.jpg Exported file with watermark included. I used 100 percent opacity for this example so you can better see it. But I could easily go back and change the opacity and export again.

By having complete control over the appearance and application of the watermark, this allows you to create the right look for purpose at hand. Give it a try and see what you think.

Rock Luminar with my new Essential Training

You learn all the ins and outs of Luminar 2018 via my Essential Training on lynda.com and on LinkedIn Learning. It's fun, and I promise, you will learn a lot.

Updates for both Mac and Windows versions of Luminar 2018 are available now. Existing users simply need to: Launch Luminar 2018, on the Top Menu Bar choose Luminar 2018 > Check for updates (Mac), or for Windows, on the Top Toolbar choose Help > Check for updates.

luminar-update.jpg

The improvements for each platform include:

Mac

  • Fast RAW opening
  • Super fast image editing and adjusting
  • Faster image export
  • DCP Profiles support
  • Automatic Lens Correction (fix Lens Distortion, remove Chromatic Aberration and Defringe)
  • Enhanced image quality on image view - most of the demosaic and green equilibration issues have been fixed
  • Big number of stability fixes
  • UI and UX improvements
  • Localisations updated (German, Japanese, Chinese & more)

Windows

  • Super fast image editing and adjusting
  • Faster image export
  • Batch processing feature
  • Free transform image feature
  • Flip/Rotate image feature
  • Automatic Lens Correction (fix Lens Distortion, remove Chromatic Aberration and Defringe)
  • Big number of stability fixes
  • UI and UX improvements
  • Localisations updated
  • Added ability to change localisation language in the application main menu
  • Fixes with color profiles on export/in plugin mode
  • Preview mode feature added (F hotkey)
  • Enhanced image quality on image view - fixed most of demosaic and green equilibration

I've been running the Mac version without any hiccups on a MacBook Pro with macOS High Sierra. I have seen some reports from Windows users that they are getting error messages. I don't know how widespread that is. But if you use Windows and are on a mission critical assignment, I might wait a day or so to see what the issues may or may not be.

New Luminar Jupiter Offer

Skylum is also running an update/purchase offer that includes the following bonuses:

Luminar 2018: the most powerful and technologically advanced photo editor for Mac & Windows (worth $69) - Luminar 2018 is a fast, versatile, and intuitive image editor, which can take your workflow from RAW file to fully finished image without needing to use any other image editor.

The Complete Landscape Photography Guide ebook from Photzy (worth $50) - An outstanding guide written by professional photographer and writer Kent DuFault. This ebook has something for everyone, with 237 pages packed full of information and assignments that will transform your landscape photography.

Aerial Photography & Video with Matt Granger (worth $79) - World-renowned photographer, Matt Granger will share planning, shooting and editing aerial stills and video. Matt will also demonstrate editing with Luminar 2018 on his still aerial images.

Photography Tutorial by Daniel Kordan (worth $29) - Extensive tutorial with a full workflow demonstration by expert landscape photographer Daniel Kordan. This tutorial includes shooting and post-processing images in Luminar 2018.

119 Dramatic & Romantic Sky overlays (worth $29) - This is an amazing addition to your photo editing workflow, and will help give boring skies that 'wow!' factor.

Splitsville Presets By Brian Matiash (worth $15) - Add a professional polish to your images with these cool presets.

Current users of Luminar 2017 may upgrade for $49; new users can purchase Luminar 2018 for $69. You can get an additional $10 off using coupon code: THEDIGITALSTORY

Rock Luminar with my new Essential Training

You learn all the ins and outs of Luminar 2018 via my Essential Training on lynda.com and on LinkedIn Learning. It's fun, and I promise, you will learn a lot.

Photos for macOS is a terrific app for managing videos captured with iPhones and mirrorless cameras. You have organizing features such as albums, keywords, and location data. Plus it has a few tricks up its sleeve, such as exporting single frames from your movies as Tiffs.

Given the high quality of our video capture these days, this is a reasonable approach for publishing photographs online. In fact, the image I used with this week's TDS podcast was snagged from an iPhone video. Here's how it works.

Export a single frame as a photo from Photos for macOS High Sierra Essential Training by Derrick Story

Photos sends the Tiff file to your Pictures folder. From there you can retrieve it and open it in an app such as Preview, or import it back into Photos. It's really a handy feature that I find myself using more and more.

export-frame-as-photo.png

New Photos for macOS High Sierra Training!

Is it time for you to learn the ins and outs of the latest version of Photos? Take a look at Photos for macOS High Sierra Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning, or on lynda.com. Maximize your iPhone photography and complement the work you do with your mirrorless cameras as well. You'll love your cameras even more...

Also be sure to check out my new book, The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition. It's completely up to date!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #630, April 10, 2018. Today's theme is "I Probably Could Have Done that Better." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Allen Saunders wrote in 1957, "Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans." John Lennon later used the quote in his song, "Beautiful Boy (Darling Boy)". And any photographer who has ever hit the road knows exactly how this feels. In this week's podcast, I share how even the best laid plans can go awry when life intervenes. I hope you enjoy the show.

I Probably Could Have Done that Better

Dex-Video-Web.jpg

The first story involves the Leica D-LUX Type 109 that I traveled with over the last two weeks. It all started during happy hour at Fleetwood's on Front Street in Lahaina.

The next story happened during another happy hour at the Kaanapali Beach Club. We spotted two whales playing off the coastline.

The third story happened while exploring a waterfall and pool on the road to Hana. I wanted a long exposure for the water, but had forgotten my tripod.

Blackmagic Unveils a $1,295 Compact Camera That Shoots 4K RAW

DP Review reports that: Blackmagic has just announced its Pocket Cinema Camera 4K, a Micro Four Thirds compact camera that puts 4K RAW recording in your pocket for $1,295.

The camera is a long-awaited successor to the original Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera of 2013, which offered 1080p RAW in a tiny camera body.

Inside the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is a 4/3 HDR sensor with 4096×2160 resolution and 13 stops of dynamic range. It has a dual native ISO of up to 25600.

"The full size of the 4/3 sensor is designed to perfectly match MFT lenses so the crop factor is greatly reduced, giving customers a wider field of view," Blackmagic says.

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Ed is now available on Amazon. If you purchase the book, send me proof, and I'll send you a link to my movie, "How to Organize Like a Pro in Photos." This offer is good until April 15, 2018. Use the Contact Form on The Nimble Photographer site. Also, feel free to post a review on Amazon once you've read the book. They're helpful to potential buyers.

Digital Asset Management with Luminar - Nimble Classroom

Even though I have the class scheduled for April 21, I'm going to have to move it back until Skylum releases the gold copy of the DAM. If you've already signed up for the class, I will contact you directly about this. If you want to grab one of the few remaining seats, I would go ahead and do that as well. We will run the class as soon as the software is ready.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Dates Announced for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop

We have our cabin reservations secured for Sept. 27-29, 2018 for the Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park Workshop. Here's more about it.

I'm hoping to send out reservation forms later this week.

Aerial Photography Workshop Update

Public registration is now open for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Be sure to get on the Reserve List for this one!

Come Join me at the Skylum Photography Public Group

I'm now moderating the Skylum Photography Public Group, and I would love to have interested members from our audience join me there.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Road Trip Over - How Did it Go?

I'm back! No more crowded airports, funky rental cars, or rotten WiFi connectivity. But what I do have is a library full of fresh imagery, 3 rolls of exposed film, and movie footage for our Patreon Inner Circle Members. Plus, I recorded and produced a podcast, published articles, and kept up with my moderation duties for the Skylum Photography Group. And I did all of that using only the contents in this bag.

IMG_1763-web.jpg

So, now that I'm back, what's the verdict?

Well, all four cameras performed great. The Leica D-LUX produced fantastic images in a variety of lighting conditions. I relied on it heavily in Honolulu where I did a lot of street photography. I also took it hiking a couple times, and other than the limited reach of the 24-70mm lens, I thought it performed admirably.

The Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II was perfect for those situations when I needed interchangeable lenses or that lovely tilting LCD screen. It was super compact with its 45mm f/1.8 lens that I often shot with using the 2X digital tele-converter. I also used the Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 prime quite often. Pictures look great!

I forget how much I really like the Olympus TG-4 until I'm on a trip like this where water is everywhere. Whether I was in the ocean or hiking through a sudden rain storm, the TG-4 was there and ready to shoot. Plus, its geotagging feature really helped me stay on top of all the locations I worked.

And finally, the Contax 159MM with Zeiss 28-70mm zoom was a real joy to shoot with during the second week. By then, I was already in an island frame of mind, and the film camera was the perfect fit for capturing the flavor of Lahaina and Hana.

For your reference, here's the packing list for my gear bag on the trip:

At one point, we saw whales off the coast and considered jumping on a boat for a closer look. Briefly, I lamented not bringing a longer lens for that expedition. But as it turned out, the water was too choppy for shooting from a vessel, and we passed on the trip. So no harm done. But, I may want to revisit my long lens decision in the future.

So, the bottom line is: I pulled it off. I had my bag with me on planes, trains, and automobiles, in restaurants, and in nature. And I loved it. What a fun (and successful) shooting adventure.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.