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Capturing great images of high school students is one of my favorite assignments. I've learned a lot over the years, and I've poured as much of that knowledge as possible into my newly revised, Learn How to Photograph High School Senior Portraits 2018 on LinkedIn Learning.

hs-senior-portraits-lr.jpg

For this new release, I've kept the interesting live action sequences with actual high school seniors, including shooting sessions and discussion about what they are looking for in a portrait session. Then, I added movies showing how to use Lightroom, Capture One Pro, and Photos for macOS to sort, edit, and share the best pictures from the session.

This title reflects the best of both worlds: understanding how to capture great images of teens combined with using the current software tools available to us. Here's a peek at the movie trailer.

Learn how to photograph high school seniors from Portrait Photography: High School Seniors by Derrick Story

If you've been tasked with photographing a high school student in your family, or if you're interested in adding this type of assignment to your freelance work, then I encourage you to watch Learn How to Photograph High School Senior Portraits on LinkedIn Learning.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I recently discovered the Think Tank Duo 5 ($20.75). And it's since become my preferred storage and travel companion for the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8, 17mm, 25mm, and 45mm f/1.2 PRO lenses. They fit perfectly inside this case.

P9186653.jpg The Think Tank Lens Case Duo 5 with Olympus 17mm f/1.2 PRO lens.

The "Duo" refers to the dual access via either the top YKK zipper, or a second one down the front. The thinking is that we'd use the top for retrieving our lens when in a camera bag, and that the side zipper would be more handy when the pouch is on our belt. I still find myself using the top most of the time. (This is especially true with the lens cap reversed on the optic. It's just easier from above.)

P9186655.jpg Olympus 17mm f/1.2 with lens cap and hood inside the Lens Duo 5 case.

But there's more to this case than dueling zippers. The well-padded, softly-lined pouch material, handy belt loop, and two outer stretchy pockets are all nice touches. You can use one outer pocket for a microfiber cloth and the other to stash the lens cap when the optic is in use.

P9186657.jpg The Think Tank lens case Duo 5 with microfiber cloth.

The Lens Duo 5 is a reasonable $20.75 and comes in two colors, black and green. I think the green is really attractive. The Duo 5 holds a Canon/Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, Canon 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6, Canon/Nikon 50mm f/1.4, Nikon 55-200mm f/4-5.6 AF-S, Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8, 40-150mm f/4-5.6, and the trio of f/1.2 PRO lenses. And there are five other Duo models as well, allowing you to stylishly transport practically any optic in your collection.

Most of us don't think as much about lens pouches as we do about the bags they go in. The Lens Case Duo 5 just might change that.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #653, Sept. 18, 2018. Today's theme is "iPhone XS: It's Nice, But I Don't Need It." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Last Wednesday during the Apple event, I pulled the iPhone X out of my front pocket, examined the screen and camera lens, and said to myself, "I'm good." The device is doing exactly what I need it to do: take good pictures, help manage my life, and provide a little entertainment. And other than a few minor tweaks, the iPhone XS does the same thing. Am I missing something by not upgrading? We'll explore further on today's show.

iPhone XS: It's Nice, But I Don't Need It

After 10 months of very enjoyable use, my iPhone X still has 216 GBs of free space. The battery life is excellent, lasting me a full day when needed. (I don't charge it all night anymore, only as needed during the day.) And other than its one weird quirk of taking screenshots when I don't intend to (opposite button syndrome), I truly enjoy using it.

But to be empirical as well, I looked up the specs and comparisons for the just-announced iPhone XS to evaluate my opinion. Here are the highlights.

Apple-Pres-1024.jpg

  • Size and Weight: They are virtually the same.
  • Screen type and resolution: same. But the XS has better dynamic range.
  • Processor: A12 vs A11: iPhone XS - Apple A12 'Bionic' chipset: Six-Core CPU, Six Core GPU, M12 motion coprocessor, 4GB RAM. iPhone X - Apple A11 'Bionic' chipset: Six-Core CPU, Six Core GPU, M11 motion coprocessor, 3GB RAM
  • Camera resolution: same (12MP/7MP) - But the XS has a new sensor with bigger photo sites.
  • New computational photography offerings on the XS, such as Smart HDR, enhanced bokeh effect, and depth control.
  • Speakers: XS has 25 increase in speaker volume and stereo support
  • SIM support: XS has eSIM to share work/home or home/roaming numbers in a single device. The X does not.
  • Slightly better battery life for XS
  • Gold case offering for XS.

So, since my iPhone X is in such good shape and performing well, I'm good. Plus, I kind of like having the 10 year anniversary handset. If I had an older iPhone, I would indeed be tempted by the iPhone XS.

The Portfoliobox Featured Image

Have you visited our TDS Facebook Page in the last few days? If so, what do you think of the beautiful image from Morocco by Jay Tuttle as the featured banner? Maybe yours will be next?

Each week for the month of September, I'm going to feature a PortfolioBox Pro image as the banner for our TDS Facebook Page. I will select the image from my list of TDS PortfolioBox Pro users, and include the photographer's name and link.

If you've signed up for a Portfoliobox Pro account, and have published at least one page, then send me the link to that site. Use the Contact Form on the Nimble Photographer and provide your name, the link, and the subject of the page or site you've published. I will add it to our PortfolioBox Pro Directory.

I love using Portfoliobox for these reasons:

  • My images look great, both on my computer and on my mobile devices.
  • It's easy to use. Without any instruction, I'm adding a high quality page in just minutes.
  • It's affordable. There's a free plan and a Pro version. The Pro version is only $82.80 per year or $8.90 per month USD, and that's before the 20 percent TDS discount.

In addition to unlimited pages, you get a personalized domain name, web hosting, and up to 1,000 images.

Get Started Today

Just go to the TDS Landing Page to get started with your free account, or to receive the 20 percent discount on the Pro version. And if you want to see the page that I've begun, visit www.derrickstoryphotography.com.

Cleaner Audio with SoundSoap

Here is a nifty application for vloggers who need to process and post their content quickly. SoundSoap can help you with:

  • Fix background noises
  • Fix low volume
  • Fix hum problems
  • Fix low/rumble sounds
  • Drag & Drop popular formats
  • No loss of video quality
  • Works automatically

I was up and running immediately with it. The learning curve is about 5 minutes. And for audio processing software, it's affordable. There are different versions of the app, but I'm using SoundSoap Solo 5 (Mac and Windows) that costs $79. You can purchase it from their website. I downloaded mine from the Mac App Store because it's a more convenient way to manage my software.

The bottom line is that for fast-moving video projects where you want the best sound possible, SoundSoap is an essential component of the workflow. It's fast, affordable, easy to use, and works great.

Inner Circle Members: New York Fine Art Greeting Cards

My latest printing project is creating a set of 6 fine art greeting cards from my trip to New York. Inner Circle members, not only can you help me choose the final images, but by doing so, you become eligible to win a free set of the cards.

Starting last week, I published two images on our Inner Circle site. Post a comment as to which one you prefer best, and you are automatically entered in the drawing. We'll do this once a week throughout September. At the end of each week, I'll randomly choose a name from the comments and send them a completed set of fine art cards once they are finished. This week's winner is: Bill Riski.

If you want to participate, you can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

Updates and Such

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There are many quick-turnaround video projects that I don't want to run through Final Cut Pro X for the sake of speed. But I still want the best audio possible. In those instances, I've turned to SoundSoap 5 to reduce unwanted noise. Here's why.

soundsoap-interface.jpg The SoundSoap Solo 5 Interface.

I've been assembling a super nimble video blogging rig that I can carry around in my pocket. I plan on using this to cover PhotoPlus in October and beyond. At the moment, I'm testing the Fujifilm XF10 (9 ounces, 24MP, APS-C sensor, $499) with an Audio-Technica Consumer ATR3350iS Omnidirectional Condenser Lavalier Microphone ($29). I'll record short vlogs with this rig, run it through SoundSoap, then publish on Vimeo. Here's a sample.

Video Blogging with the Fujifilm XF10 from Derrick Ronald Story on Vimeo. (Note: you will need a 3.5mm to 2.5mm adapter for this setup. The XF10 had a 2.5mm audio port.)

SoundSoap is key to this workflow. The lavaliere mic plugged into the Fujifilm XF10 really improves the audio compared to its onboard mics. That being said, camera audio interfaces tend to be noisy, and the output still needs processing afterward.

On bigger projects, I use Final Cut Pro X to clean up the audio. But I want to move faster than that for vlogging. SoundSoap allows me to reduce noise and enhance my voice quickly, then upload the file to Vimeo for publishing. Here are some of its features.

  • Works automatically
  • Fix background noises
  • Fix low volume
  • Fix hum problems
  • Fix low/rumble sounds
  • Drag & Drop popular formats
  • No loss of video quality

I was up and running immediately with it. The learning curve is about 5 minutes. And for audio processing software, it's affordable. There are different versions of the app, but I'm using SoundSoap Solo 5 (Mac and Windows) that costs $79. You can purchase it from their website. I downloaded mine from the Mac App Store because it's a more convenient way to manage my software.

The bottom line is that for fast-moving video projects where you want the best sound possible, SoundSoap is an essential component of the workflow. It's fast, affordable, easy to use, and works great.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Starting today, you can preorder Aurora HDR 2019. I've had a chance to run this on my Mac, and it is clearly my favorite version of this intelligent HDR software.

UI_14_Aurora HDR'19.jpg

At the core of this update is the Quantum HDR Engine, an AI-powered tone mapping technology that's been three years in the making within Skylum's AI lab.

With Quantum HDR, when creating an HDR image using multiple bracketed shots, the engine analyzes the photos and intelligently merges them. Not only does it minimize the major issues that we often experience with HDR merging tools, but it produces images that are dynamic and natural-looking.

The Quantum HDR Engine reduces burned colors, loss of contrast, and noise, as well as mitigates unnatural lighting caused by halos and unstable deghosting. To do this, Skylum developers tested thousands of bracketed shots through a neural network, then took those findings to develop the technology needed to create top level HDR photographs.

The interface will also feel very natural to Luminar users. I like that I can load either piece of software, and feel at home working right away.

Aurora HDR 2019 is available for pre-order starting today (Mac and Windows). Pre-orders include bonus downloadable content and costs $89 for a new purchase and $49 for an upgrade.

When released on October 4th, the price will jump to $99 new and $59 for an upgrade. The bonus pack includes:

  • Video tutorial "Getting the Most from Aurora HDR 2019" by Trey Ratcliff
  • The Landscape Photography Handbook by David Johnston
  • Exclusive interior Aurora Looks by Richard Harrington
  • Burning Mood LUTs by Richard Harrington
  • 3-month 500px Pro membership
  • $300 OFF a multi-day Iceland Photo Tour

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

There are many advantages to shooting with a fixed focal length camera. The manufacturer can optimize the relationship between the lens and sensor, you don't have to worry about dust getting on the chip, and more often than not, there's an economy of scale as well.

XF10-28mm-50mm.jpg

What you don't get, however, is the variety of framing options that is enjoyed with a zoom lens. Or do you? That depends on how you feel about the digital teleconverter function. I've been testing this feature on a brand new Fujifilm XF10 compact digital camera ($499).

The camera captures natively at an equivalent 28mm focal length. But it does include a digital teleconverter that allows the user to frame at 35mm and 50mm perspectives while retaining the same pixel dimensions (6000 x 4000). What a great convenience! But is it any good? Let's take a look.

Fujifilm XF10 - 28mm Native Native 28mm Capture - f/2.8, ISO 1600, 1/8th on a table using the self-timer. Original image unedited. Can download and examine by clicking on it. Photo by Derrick Story.

Fujifilm XF10 - 35mm Digital Teleconverter Digital Teleconverter 35mm Capture - f/2.8, ISO 1600, 1/8th on a table using the self-timer. Original image unedited. Can download and examine by clicking on it. Photo by Derrick Story.

Fujifilm XF10 - 50mm Digital Teleconverter Digital Teleconverter 50mm Capture - f/2.8, ISO 1600, 1/8th on a table using the self-timer. Original image unedited. Can download and examine by clicking on it. Photo by Derrick Story.

If you download the images and magnify, you can see some differences. But at normal viewing size, it's really hard to tell what is native and what is digitally enhanced.

File size differences provide more clues to what you actually get. The 28mm image is 6.1 MBs, the 35mm version is 5.7 MBs, and the 50mm version is 4.9 MBs. BTW: All three files were captured in Jpeg Fine mode. The Digital Teleconverter does not work in RAW.

So what's the verdict? I guess that depends on your tolerance level. For me, unless it's critical use, I'm fine with the Digital Teleconverter on this camera. It provides additional framing options with a minimal penalty.

I'm curious to see what you think once you download and examine the files for yourself. You can comment on our TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The 9-ounce, 24 MP, APS-C Fujifilm XF10 compact digital camera is available from B&H Photo in two colors for $499. I think it's a steal.

fujifilm-xf10-front.jpg

This is The Digital Story Podcast #652, Sept. 11, 2018. Today's theme is "The Fujifilm XF10: A Remarkable Compact." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It may seen crazy to create an ultra-compact camera to go up against premium smartphones. But no-one ever accused Fujifilm of being timid. And after the first dozen shots with this 9 ounce wonder, I realized that the engineers at Fujifilm had worked their magic once again. Join me today as I explain why the XF10 should be in every nimble photographer's pocket.

The Fujifilm XF10: A Remarkable Compact

If my iPhone X were the dimensions of a box, the Fujifilm XF10 ($499) would fit inside of it. Yet, the XF10 houses a 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor that is 14 times larger than typical smartphone chips. It has a razor sharp f/2.8 FUJINON aspherical lens, low-energy Bluetooth 4.1, and WiFi. And even though its images are superior to my iPhone X, it was designed to humble it, rather complement it.

After pairing the two devices, they are like brothers. The iPhone provides realtime GPS data so that all of my images are geotagged. It's always listening for downloads from the XF10. If I need to share an image, I can go from camera to Internet in just moments. The iPhone can also serve as a remote release and command center for the XF10.

Top Floor, Barn Tierra Vegetables in Santa Rosa, CA - www.tierravegetables.com. Captured with a Fujifilm XF10 in Jpeg Fine mode, unedited. Photo by Derrick Story

The Fujifilm imagery is gorgeous. Vibrant colors, superb detail, and 6000x4000 resolution. That's more than my E-M1 Mark II that weighs in at 5184x3888. And just like my mirrorless cameras, the XF10 has every trick in the book from time-lapse to HDR, plus features such as 4K burst and Fuji film simulations. Before we go any further, let's take a look at the specs.

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor (Bayer type sensor with no low pass or AA filter - Not X-Trans)
  • Fujinon 18.5mm f/2.8 Fixed Lens (28mm equivalent)
  • 35mm and 50mm digital teleconverter (Jpeg only)
  • 3" 1040k-Dot LCD Touchscreen
  • Max ISO: 12800 (51200 Extended)
  • 11 Film Simulations, 19 Advanced Filters
  • Bluetooth 4.1 and WiFi
  • 4K and Full HD Video Recording
  • External mic jack (2.5mm) and HDMI out
  • Sophisticated flash with rear curtain and slow sync
  • New Snap Focus and Square Mode
  • Mechanical and electronic shutter up to 1/16000th
  • Two command dials, one command ring, mode dial, two function buttons, and four more function swipes on the touchscreen
  • Excellent battery life, NP95 model

What the Camera Does Not Have

  • Articulating screen
  • Electronic viewfinder
  • Accessory hot shoe
  • Accessory filter ring
  • No ACROS film profile (But it does have Classic Chrome)

Brian the Welder "Brian the Welder" - Tierra Vegetables in Santa Rosa, CA - www.tierravegetables.com. Captured with a Fujifilm XF10 in Jpeg Fine mode, unedited. Photo by Derrick Story

If you want a 9 ounce, finely-machined 24MP APS-C camera, there's really only one option: the Fujifilm XF10. The only other game in town is the Ricoh GR II that costs $100 more and doesn't have the modern connectivity. As for me, I'm really happy the XF10 came along.

The Portfoliobox Featured Image

Have you visited our TDS Facebook Page in the last few days? If you, what do you think of the infrared image by Dan Horton-Szar as the featured banner? Maybe yours will be next.

Each week for the month of September, I'm going to feature a PortfolioBox Pro image as the banner for our TDS Facebook Page. I will select the image from my list of TDS PortfolioBox Pro users, and include the photographer's name and link.

If you've signed up for a Portfoliobox Pro account, and have published at least one page, then send me the link to that site. Use the Contact Form on the Nimble Photographer and provide your name, the link, and the subject of the page or site you've published. I will add it to our PortfolioBox Pro Directory.

I love using Portfoliobox for these reasons:

  • My images look great, both on my computer and on my mobile devices.
  • It's easy to use. Without any instruction, I'm adding a high quality page in just minutes.
  • It's affordable. There's a free plan and a Pro version. The Pro version is only $82.80 per year or $8.90 per month USD, and that's before the 20 percent TDS discount.

In addition to unlimited pages, you get a personalized domain name, web hosting, and up to 1,000 images.

Get Started Today

Just go to the TDS Landing Page to get started with your free account, or to receive the 20 percent discount on the Pro version. And if you want to see the page that I've begun, visit www.derrickstoryphotography.com.

Flickr Rolls Out a Fresh Look to its Galleries

As reported by The Phoblographer:

"Heads up, Flickr users! The platform has recently revamped its galleries, so you might want to take a look what has changed if you haven't been around making galleries of your favorite works by your favorite creatives.

According to the Flickr blog post announcing the long overdue revamp, the all new galleries now showcase photos and videos in a much larger layout to take advantage of today's new screen sizes and resolutions. The limit on photos that users can add to galleries have also been increased from 50 to 500. They also added a new modal batch for adding photos straight from our Faves.

The galleries list page has also been given a nice refresh, where we can now see a triptych of photos with the cover photo being slightly larger than the next two most recently added ones. The gallery metadeta at-a-glance also comes in a new card style that Flickr uses in the gallery itself."

And if you really want to see a treat, visit the TDS Member Photo Galleries on Flickr. Here's where I curate our outstanding Member Photo of the Day images. This new gallery interface really shows them off. It's a visual treat!

Inner Circle Members: New York Fine Art Greeting Cards

My latest printing project is creating a set of 6 fine art greeting cards from my trip to New York. Inner Circle members, not only can you help me choose the final images, but by doing so, you become eligible to win a free set of the cards.

Starting last week, I published two images on our Inner Circle site. Post a comment as to which one you prefer best, and you are automatically entered in the drawing. We'll do this once a week throughout September. At the end of each week, I'll randomly choose a name from the comments and send them a completed set of fine art cards once they are finished. This week's winner is: Edward J Shields.

If you want to participate, you can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

Updates and Such

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Camera hardware is dominating industry news right now, and for good reason. Big announcements from Nikon, Canon, and Fujifilm definitely get the blood pumping. But once we navigate past Photokina and settle down later this month, there will also be a couple of important software releases as well.

Both macOS Mojave with its redesigned Finder and Luminar 2018 with Digital Asset Manager will provide new tools for Mac photographers wanting a fresh look on their computer screens.

gallery-mode.jpg

The redesigned Finder is good news for photographers because of its enhanced viewing experience via dark mode and gallery view. Without having to open any applications (not counting the Finder as a app), photographers can sort through folders of images using powerful search tools. Apple is also providing extensive image metadata in the gallery view, something they did not give us in Photos for macOS High Sierra.

It will be interesting to test the official release of Mojave to see how far the Finder can take us toward managing our images.

Speaking of digital asset management, Skylum is putting the finishing touches on their DAM, which will also be released this Fall. Much in the way they invigorated image editing with their Luminar app, they plan to bring that magic to digital asset management. There are working on versions for both Mac and Windows platforms. So just about everyone can take advantage of these new tools.

All of this will come at very little cost to the customer. macOS Mojave will be a free download to Mac users. The Luminar DAM will be a free upgrade for Luminar 2018 users. That's a lot of goodies for very little investment.

The second half of 2018 is boon for photographers. With all the new hardware, plus new tools on the software side, we could be looking at a much different workflow by the end of the year.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When I was first introduced to the Olympus PEN E-P1 in May of 2009, I saw an opportunity to work with an interchangeable lens camera that was high quality, affordable, and nimble. In June of 2009, I introduced my podcast audience to the camera. I've been working with mirrorless bodies ever since.

PEN-F-with-17mm.jpg The Olympus PEN-F.

With the latest round of announcements from Nikon, Canon, and Fujifilm, I wanted to share a few things to think about if you're considering getting more serious about this gear.

  • Don't Ditch Your DSLR - at least not right away. There are advantages to the optical viewfinder, and electronic viewfinders take some getting use to. Personally, I like both, but in different situations. I still prefer optical for outdoors and love the EVF indoors. Give yourself time to learn your preferences. Plus, take advantage of the important lenses that you already own.
  • Do Try Realtime Exposure Compensation - One of my favorite mirrorless features is realtime exposure compensation. It has improved my photography and shortened my post production time. Just look through the EVF, adjust the exposure, and see that adjustment applied in the viewfinder. Incredible.
  • Don't Get Stuck on Full Frame - Micro Four Thirds and cropped sensor mirrorless cameras produce high quality images with much smaller lenses. What good does it do to switch to mirrorless if you're not taking full advantage of reducing size and weight? Keep your full frame DSLR when you need it, and enjoy being nimble when you don't.
  • Do Your Research - Based on the numbers that I'm seeing, investing in a new mirrorless system will run you between $2,000 and $10,000 depending on what you choose. Make sure that you are adding capability to your toolbox and not just duplicating what you already have with new gear. Use your budget to fill the gaps.

My current mirrorless favorites are the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II ($1,699), the Olympus PEN-F ($999), and the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II with lens ($499 - an incredible value!). The image quality with these cameras is amazing, and you can easily bring them with you anywhere in the world.

I hope you find a system that you enjoy just as much.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #651, Sept. 4, 2018. Today's theme is "Photography and Philanthropy - The Story of Home Alone." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Social networks have seen their share of user abuse over the last few years. But like so many things in life, the headlines often focus on the bad instead of the good. And as storytellers, we have an incredible opportunity to balance this narrative, and yes, even help others, by applying our skills online. Today, I share one such story that involves a sentimental photographer and an abandoned cat. I hope you enjoy the show.

Photography and Philanthropy - The Story of Home Alone

"Home Alone" is the name I gave to the sweet tuxedo kitty that lived next door. She was abandoned by the renters who picked up and moved away, leaving behind furniture, a non-operative truck, and this cat.

Home-Alone-TDS.jpg

I heard her meowing one morning as I was getting ready to leave for work. The renters had been gone for a couple days. She had a water and food bowl on the front porch. That was it.

I fed her and filled her water bowl, and thought to myself, "Who could do this?" She was a great cat: cute, friendly, light on her paws. I began a morning ritual of reading my email on her front porch while she ate and rubbed up against my legs. But I knew I had to find her a home.

I already had a territorial feral cat living in the backyard, rescued from the fire kitty in the house, and Dibs at the studio. So we were going to have to get the word for Home Alone.

Here's what I came up with, and how it worked. (You can visit the Facebook post that I created for Home Alone.)

Tips for Posting a Piece to Help Another

  • Leverage your existing platform. People who follow you will listen to your story.
  • Capture a good image. The picture is so important. It will garner viewers' attention and help tell the story.
  • Keep your post pithy and on target. Don't ramble on.
  • Don't be too emotional. Regardless of how you feel, don't intentionally pull at the heartstrings of others. Let them come to their own conclusions.
  • Follow up and provide closure.

The Portfoliobox Featured Image

Over the summer, I've received many notes from new PortfolioBox users who are thrilled with this platform for curating their images. And now, I want to shine a light on some of those best photographs.

Each week for the month of September, I'm going to feature a PortfolioBox Pro image as the banner for our TDS Facebook Page. I will select the image from my list of TDS PortfolioBox Pro users, and include the photographer's name and link. Each week, I will select a new image and feature it.

If you've signed up for a Portfoliobox Pro account, and have published at least one page, then send me the link to that site. Use the Contact Form on the Nimble Photographer and provide your name, the link, and the subject of the page or site you've published. I will add it to our PortfolioBox Pro Directory.

The Best Laid Plans - My Rocky Nook Webinar on Photos for macOS

Here's the sad tale of last week's webinar that I had planned so carefully for.

Inner Circle Members: New York Fine Art Greeting Cards

My latest printing project is creating a set of 6 fine art greeting cards from my trip to New York. Inner Circle members, not only can you help me choose the final images, but by doing so, you become eligible to win a free set of the cards.

Starting later this week, I'm going to publish two images on our Inner Circle site. Post a comment as to which one you prefer best, and you are automatically entered in the drawing. We'll do this once a week throughout September. At the end of the month, I'll randomly choose four names from the comments and send them a completed set of fine art cards.

If you want to participate, you can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

Updates and Such

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

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