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I can't be the only photographer who sometimes needs to export just a single image quickly for a web post, then later on send out an entire batch at different resolutions. It all depends on the task at hand, right?

Capture One Pro is quite versatile in this area. There are two distinct ways to export images from your catalog. The first is the actual Export command (File > Export Images), and the second is using the Output tab with its Process Recipes. Take a look at this video for a quick overview of each method.

I tend to use File > Export for those quick tasks when I'm only sending an image or two to the Desktop. But I love having the Output option for the bigger jobs when I want to send images out of the catalog at multiple resolutions, simultaneously.

batch-export-cp1.jpg The Output tab is perfect for bigger export jobs.

This is a terrific system for getting your images out of your catalog and in to clients' hands, social sites, and on your mobile devices.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

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Macphun has created a new Editing Extension for Photos users, and it's a blast. Filters for Photos is a quality, editable, effects app that allows you to apply a variety of filters, then edit them with an easy to use masking tool. And if that wasn't good enough, the download is free.

03-Comparing-web.jpg An array of interesting filters to choose from. Images by Derrick Story.

When you first download the app, you get 15 filters. If you opt-in for their mailing list, you'll receive another 15 filters (they're automatically added to the app) for a total of 30. You can use the app as a standalone, or enable it as an Editing Extension for Photos for OS X (System Preferences > Extensions > Photos > Filters for Photos).

When you first load an image, it appears in the browser with thumbnails of the filter options below. Simple click on the effect you want, and it's applied. You can use the contextual sliders to adjust further. Or, click on the Mask button and paint the effect specifically where you want it. The masking toolset has everything you need, and it's easy to use.

masking-in-filters.jpg The masking tool is easy to use and powerful.

After just a half an hour or so of playing with Filters for Photos, I was quite comfortable applying and editing the effects. And if you're using it as an Editing Extension, which I recommend, then the image is integrated into your Photos for OS X library, and the work is totally non-destructive.

Filters for Photos is a fun app that belongs in the toolbox for any Mac photographer.

Coming Soon: The Apple Photos Book for Photographers

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I've been working on a guide to Photos for OS X that's written for photographers who want to use this application at a high level. I cover workflow, iCloud integration, and editing... at the enthusiast level.

We're releasing the eBook version soon, then will go to print after Apple announces its updates to the app at WWDC. This is an exciting, ongoing project that I think you'll want to be a part of. And you can join me every step of the way via the signup page we've created. This is going to be fun...

Master Photos for OS X

(It's More Powerful than You Think)

For hands-on tutorials, be sure to take a look at Photos for OS X Essential Training on lynda.com. I cover everything you need to know to get the most from this surprisingly powerful image management application.

More Help and Insights on Photos for OS X

Don't forget about the Photos for OS X Special Feature Section on The Digital Story. It's a roundup of tutorials, videos, and articles focused on helping you master Apple's latest photo management software. You can also find it under Photography in the top nav bar.

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When you learn the difference between Flickr's Camera Roll and its traditional Photostream, the offer of 1TB of free online storage makes more sense. Here's why.

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The Camera Roll can be configured to automatically backup every image you capture with a Flickr-connected device. The images remain private, however, so the public doesn't see the 36 versions of a daisy that you photographed in a moment of artistic inspiration.

Instead, you choose which of those 36 versions you like best, then publish it in your Photostream by making it public. It's similar to the process of shooting a roll of film, then deciding which frame gets enlarged to a print... except much cheaper with Flickr. Here's a short movie that explains these differences.

So now, 1TB of free online storage makes more sense. You can configure Flickr to receive all of your smartphone, tablet, and WiFi-connected camera shots, then decide later which ones to publish. I cover the entire workflow in my new lynda.com training, Sharing Photos with Flickr.

If you haven't looked a Flickr for a while, you may want to watch some of these movies, then revisit your account. There are many practical, helpful tools in the modern Flickr, and it's wildly cost effective.


Sharing Photos with Flickr is a deep dive into this venerable online photography platform, focusing on how to best use its tools with a Mac or Windows computer. I show you how to configure Flickr to automatically backup your images, organize them, and share your favorites with friends, family, and the entire online universe. This training will show you how to best take advantage of Flickr's 1TB of free online storage and its comprehensive set of imaging tools.

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Photographers with mirrorless gear haven't had the wide selection of high quality hand straps that their DSLR counterparts have enjoyed. Spider aims to change that with the SpiderLight Hand Strap, just launched on KickStarter.

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The SpiderLight Hand Strap is specifically designed for smaller camera bodies like Fuji X-T1, SONY a7's/7II's, and Olympus OMD, just to name a few. It can work with a wide variety of models thanks to the smart adapters included in the kit. Essentially, the adapters provide the correct angle for the grip, overcoming the one-size-fits-all challenge that often leads to a less than perfect fit.

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The bottom of the grip is secured via the camera's tripod socket. I think the SpiderLight works best in tandem with a removable plate to hold it in place. If you never use a tripod, then you can use the screw and washer combination that's included in the kit.

The reason why I like the tripod plate better is because the camera sits flat on a table when not mounted on your sticks, thanks to the flatness of most tripod plates. (The SpiderLight screw, that you have to use if you don't have a plate, protrudes a bit from the bottom of the camera.) Plus, you always have a strap attached to the camera when working on a tripod. And the SpiderLight doesn't hang down and get in the way. I think it's a terrific accessory for tripod users.

The strap itself is very comfortable. The lining against your hand is soft, and the strap material appears very durable. The shape of the strap hugs your hand, creating a sense of confidence while shooting. You can choose from a variety of colors for the detail that lines the edges of the SpiderLight.

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Currently, you can get one for your mirrorless camera for as little as $30 via their KickStarter. I think the SpiderLight is a wonderful accessory for tripod mounted cameras and for video work. It brings much greater stability to these smaller cameras. It will, however, take up a little more room in the camera bag because of its molded shape. But that's also what helps make it so darn comfortable in use.


Nimble Photographer Logo

The SpiderLight Hand Strap has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #529, April 26, 2016. Today's theme is "How to Be the Influencer." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Within every social group, there are influencers for different areas. There's the restaurant expert, wine connoisseur, computer nerd, fitness fanatic, and yes, the photography guru. Chances are good that you're the imaging influencer in your world. And today's show discuses how to be effective in that role.

How to Be the Influencer

I spent the last weekend at a father/son event at the University of Santa Clara where my son is a member of Sigma Pi. The fraternity boys plan a weekend full of activities to show their dads a good time.

Over the two days, there's lots of casual conversation that sooner or later leads to our personal interests. In my case, this was accelerated as soon as I pulled out my OM-D E-M5 Mark II to capture a few memories. "What kind of camera is that?" For some reason, I was surprised that everyone didn't already know. Then I realized, I was just anointed the photography influencer for my group.

As such, there are a few things to keep in mind. Here are a few tips to help you influence effectively.

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  • Listen First, Talk Later - If you're going to help someone with their photography questions, you actually have to hear their queries first.
  • Don't Be a Fan Boy - Yes, we all love our choice of camera and photo management software. But what works for us might not be the right fit for someone else. Draw on your extensive photographic knowledge and try to recommend things that work for the other person.
  • Don't Offer Too Many Choices - I learned long time ago that when someone asks for a camera recommendation, they want my favorite, not a top ten list.
  • Help Them with the Things They Don't Ask - You're probably not going to get too many questions about backup, for example, but you can really help them out by offering a easy to use solution.
  • Don't Dis Their Current Approach - As part of the conversation, you'll probably hear about their current choices and approaches. Stay positive and don't dis what they're already doing. Frame your recommendations as improvements, not overhauls.

In the News: New Cameras Supported by Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 6.19

Here's the list of new cameras that have RAW files supported by Photos for OS X, Preview, and Aperture:

  • Fujifilm X-E2S
  • Fujifilm X70
  • Leica S (Typ 007)
  • Leica X-U (Typ 113)
  • Nikon D5***
  • Nikon D500***
  • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-ZS60 / DMC-TZ80
  • Sony Alpha ILCE-6300
  • Sony Alpha SLT-A68

SanDisk iXpand Flash Drive for iOS Devices

SanDisk wants to expand the storage capability of mobile photographers and with the new SanDisk iXpand Flash Drive. This device plugs directly into the Lightning port of iPhones and iPads, providing between 16 and 128GBs of external memory - perfect for photographers who want to travel light.

The devices uses the free iXpand Drive app, which has a camera function, allowing users to shoot and save photos or videos directly to the drive instead of on their iPhone or iPad. The app also provides the option to automatically back up content from social networking sites, as well as play back music within the app.

App Camp for Girls

We launching App Camp For Girls Orange County at Rancho Santa Margarita Intermediate School August 8-12, and a Phoenix camp July 25-29. App Camp For Girls seeks to address the gender imbalance in technology professions by inspiring middle-school age girls with a broad introduction to the process of app development, from brainstorming and designing ideas to building and pitching their apps. We believe that the experience of creating an app that runs on a device in one week can spark the enthusiasm that will propel girls to pursue further tech education. More information and signup at appcamp4girls.com.

Updates and Such

Eastern Sierra Reservation Forms Went Out - I sent out the workshop reservation forms to the Reserve List this weekend. If you were on the list and didn't get a form, please send me an email. The Eastern Sierra photography workshop begins Thursday evening, Oct. 20 and runs through Sunday, Oct. 23rd. If you want to get on the next round reserve list, then go to the TDS Workshops page and use the Send Me Info form to get on the list.

Out of Chicago Update - The debut of The Nimble Photographer Workshop sold out on Friday, June 24. Because there is a wait list, we've added a second workshop on Thursday June 23. I hope you can join me in Chicago this coming June. There's still time for Early Bird pricing.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

ImageFramer Take your photos to the next level with ImageFramer. Visit www.apparentsoft.com today.

MacPaw Creators of CleanMyMac 3 and other great software for Apple computers. Visit www.macpaw.com today.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

sandisk-ixpand.png

SanDisk wants to expand the storage capability of mobile photographers and with the new SanDisk iXpand Flash Drive. This device plugs directly into the Lightning port of iPhones and iPads, providing between 16 and 128GBs of external memory - perfect for photographers who want to travel light.

The devices uses the free iXpand Drive app, which has a camera function, allowing users to shoot and save photos or videos directly to the drive instead of on their iPhone or iPad. The app also provides the option to automatically back up content from social networking sites, as well as play back music within the app.

Basic features include:

  • Free up space on your iPhone by moving photos and videos to your iXpand flash drive
  • Automatically back up photos and videos from your camera roll
  • Automatically back up your contacts
  • Watch popular video formats3 on your iPhone or iPad
  • Designed with a flexible connector to fit through most iPhone cases
  • High-speed USB 3.0 transfer to and from your computer
  • Secure file storage across your computer, iPhone and iPad
  • Videos automatically saved to the drive if captured from within the iXpand Drive app

The iXpand Flash Drive includes a one-year limited warranty in the United States. It's available in 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB capacities, with MSRPs of $49.99, $69.99, $89.99 and $129.99, respectively. The drive is compatible with iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iPad Pro (12.9-inch), iPad Air 2, iPad Air, iPad mini 4, iPad mini 3, iPad mini 2, iPad mini and iPod touch (5th generation) running iOS 8.2 or later.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Clarity and Structure tools in Capture One Pro allow you to adjust both fine and coarse detail in your images. There are different algorithms to choose from, so you can use "Natural" for portraits and "Neutral" for objects. And because the sliders are centered positioned, you can both increase and decrease the effect, depending on your subject.

In this training video, I show you how to use Clarity and Structure for both objects and for portraits. I review the different modes so you can see exactly how to get the effect you want for your images.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

clarity-in-c1.png

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

SF-P4151868.jpg

Participants in the TDS SF Street Photography Workshop logged many miles over the course of 3 days. On Friday alone, we worked from North Beach all the way up to Fort Point. Many of the shooters commented that they had walked 10 miles by the end of the day. Fortunately, we were using street-savvy Lowepro bags to protect and transport our gear.

Some of the photographers used the new Slingshot Edge 150 AW ($64), a sling that can hold a mirrorless body and a couple of lenses. Plus, a mini tablet will fit in a zippered front pocket. Interior areas and the adjustable divider system organized and protected their cameras and lenses, while smaller accessories were stored in the front. The Edge helped keep the load from getting too heavy, yet protected the gear our shooters needed.

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Participants who wanted to have a bit more kit used the larger Lowepro backpacks. These were particularly handy for larger DSLRs and their more bulky lenses.

I was relying on one of my favorite urban bags, the StreetLine SH 140 that I had fallen in love with during an assignment in Austin, Texas. I had my Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II and Contax G1 cameras in the StreetLine, along with an iPad and personal items for the day. I could work quickly out of the sling, and it never tired my shoulders, even over the course of climbing hills and exploring the streets of the city.

I think one of the keys to both our survival, and our ability to record hundreds of images over the course of three days, was having properly packed bags that allowed us to bring what we needed, but didn't add too much bulk as we navigated busy urban environments.

SF-P4151949.jpg

If you want to learn more about finding the right carrying solution for your adventures, jump over to lowepro.com for a look-see.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #528, April 19, 2016. Today's theme is "Handling Harsh Light." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I've had people walk up to me when I was working and remark, "Oh, it's such a beautiful, bright day for photography. You must be thrilled." And I'm thinking, "How the heck am I going to control this contrast?" Yes, indeed, harsh lighting conditions are a tough challenge for photographers. And that's the focus of today's show.

Handling Harsh Light

The reality is that we don't always have control of when we have to take pictures. Your niece's birthday parties, weddings, travel photography, and events all seem to place us in the middle of the day with camera in hand.

Since these situations are often unavoidable, how does one still capture compelling images? Well, I have a few tips that should help.

Koch-3.jpg Switching to monochrome is one method to handle contrasty lighting conditions. Photo by Mitchell Koch from the TDS SF Street Photography Workshop.

  • Switch to Monochrome Mode - Nearly every digital camera has a B&W mode, and many are quite customizable. Monochrome images can thrive in contrasty light where color shots don't.
  • Experiment with Infrared - This option works in both color and B&W. IR shots look great on a bright, sunny day.
  • Don't forget about Fill Flash - A fill light from the front can eliminate unflattering shadows, dark eyes, and help even out hotspots.
  • Use a Diffuser - If it's good enough for SI photographers shooting bikini-clad models on a sunny Caribbean beach, we can use it too. Fabric diffusers makes harsh sun flattering for portraits.
  • Built-In Camera Filters - Most mirrorless cameras have an array of built-in filters and effects, many of which look great in contrasty light.

The Digital Story Photography Podcast Debuts on Google Play Music

Starting this week, podcasts on Google Play Music in the US and Canada will begin rolling out on Android and be available on the web. The rollout on Android devices will be gradual, so users may not see podcast content on the Google Play Music app immediately.

Among those in the first wave is The Digital Story Photography Podcast. We're thrilled to be on the Google Play Music platform.

April 24th is World Pinhole Day

I saw The Phoblographer stating: "April 24th is World Pinhole Day-a day for all pinhole photographers to get out there and shoot in celebration of the old school format! Right here in NYC, The Phoblographer is teaming up with Lomography for our very own World Pinhole Day Celebration with a cool photowalk. If you've never shot pinholes, have shot them and want to do them in a more social space, then sign up!

Contax 137MD Winner

Congratulations to Kathleen C. who commented on "A Most Beautiful Break": "Very pleasing tones! I am kicking myself for having thrown out about 40 rolls of film in a "spring cleaning" accident about a year ago. Good stuff, too. Fuji velvia (ouch), Kodak Portra, Fuji Superia, T-Max, etc. I thought at the time I would never go back to film. Now, I can't get my mind off of the challenge of applying everything I have learned over the last few years with digital photography to film. I was shooting in auto mode when I was a film shooter..." Kathleen, please click on the Contact Us link at the bottom of the page for theAnalogstory.com.

Updates and Such

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

ImageFramer Take your photos to the next level with ImageFramer. Visit www.apparentsoft.com today.

MacPaw Creators of CleanMyMac 3 and other great software for Apple computers. Visit www.macpaw.com today.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Harsh Light is All Right

We spent the mid part of Saturday in Sausalito for the TDS SF Workshop. The weather was beautiful for tourists, but not ideal for photographers. So what do you do when you want to take pictures in harsh, contrasty conditions?

I have three tricks to recommend. First, fill flash can help offset nasty shadows for portraits. If you have an off-camera cord or wireless communication, you can even position the fill light at exactly the right angle.

I think shooting infrared is also a terrific option. It thrives in contrasty lighting. And the one that I'm going to show you now is using a built-in camera effect. In this case I'm using the Key Line Art Filter on my Olympus OM-D. I saw a watercolor greeting card in one of the shops, and thought, "I can do something like that right now!"

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I capture these in RAW+Jpeg, so I have the "regular" images too without the effects. For the Jpegs, I use the Large/SuperFine setting to get as many pixels as possible. And with photos like this, you can make your own fine art greeting cards. You can get the scored blank cards, envelopes, and everything else at Red River Paper's Card Shop.

So, on a bright sunny day, I put on my sun block and keep taking pictures. I could care less about harsh light.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.