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This is The Digital Story Podcast #646, July 31, 2018. Today's theme is "Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A subcompact camera with a 1" sensor is a luxury indeed. And for that reason alone, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI Digital Camera is worth a look. But then add a relatively fast Zeiss Vario-Sonnar 24-200mm zoom, popup electronic viewfinder, and 4K video recording, and you have to ask yourself, "What the heck is going on here?" We're going to answer that question in today's TDS photography podcast.

Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All

There is a lot to like about this camera... so much so, that it would probably take me two more articles to cover all of the stuff that I didn't get to here. And if you're looking for an ultra-compact all-in-one capture device, it's going to be hard to find a more capable machine.

P7256358-gear-RX100.jpg

That being said, the one thing that was missing for me was the physical experience of holding a more substantial camera. In other words, I missed the feeling of taking pictures with a camera that feels great in the hands.

This is not a knock on the RX100 VI. It was designed to serve as a marvelous compact for those who need a small form factor. And as such, Sony knocked it out of the park. And if that's what you need for business travel or vacation, I can easily recommend this camera...

... except for the one thing that I haven't talked about yet: its cost is $1,200. On one hand, it's totally worth the steep price tag. Combine the features, image sensor, and exceptional zoom lens, and you have a deluxe package that should command a premium price. But the fact of the matter is, $1,200 is a lot of money for a compact camera. And if you invest that amount of money, you'd better get your shots out of it, and that means using it more often than just during travel.


Read the full review! "The Sony RX100 VI - A Compact Beast" - The RX100 VI is a pricy, no-holds-barred compact camera. Does its extensive feature set and fantastic image quality justify the price? Here's my take - http://thedigitalstory.com/2018/07/Sony-RX100VI-review.html.


So, then, what is the answer to the question: Is it worth it? I can say, "Yes it is." But, is the Sony RX100 VI for you? Well, that depends on your credit card balance, disposable income, and yes, the most important person in your life who might see you using it and ask: "Oh, that's a cute camera. How much did it cost?"

Nauticam Releases Underwater Housing for Sony RX100 VI

F-Stoppers reports: "While the pocket-sized camera is clearly ideal for travel, the NA-RX100 VI housing is just as practical. Weighing 2.3 pounds (1.05 kilograms), you'll be happy to hear the system will take up very little space and weight in your carry-on or checked baggage.

If you like deep dives, the underwater housing can be taken to a depth of 380 feet (100 meters). It's a nice selling point, but how many divers go to such depths? The housing ships with a standard interchangeable port, which was not found on earlier versions of the Sony RX100 underwater housing line. The standard port allows use of the full zoom range -- up to 200mm -- and can be equipped with the M67 Flip Diopter Holder, which allows photographers to add the SMC-1 Super Macro Converter for shooting the tiniest ocean critters.

The new NA-RX100 VI is priced at $1,100 and is available to order now through the Nauticam website.

No Longer Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. And I'm happy to report that I now have my rebate. Here's the final chapter.

Nikon counts down to new mirrorless

DP Review reports: "Following an earlier leak, Nikon has officially started the clock on a countdown to its upcoming 'special event', widely assumed to be the launch of a new mirrorless system. The timer is counting down to 1pm, on the 23rd of August (Tokyo time). That's midnight in New York, 5am in London and 9pm on the previous day for the DPReview office here in Seattle."

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI digital camera refuses to acknowledge the normal physical limitations of traditional compact photography. Measuring a mere 4.0" x 2.3" x 1.7", and weighing-in at just 10.6 ounces, most of us would be thrilled to get a 1" sensor with 20MPs resolution, which we do. But there's a whole lot more to this sophisticated device.

P7256362-gear-RX100.jpg

I've been shooting with the RX100 VI for a few weeks. And during that time, a number of its attributes have really impressed me. And those are what I'll cover in this article. Let's start with the body itself.

Physical Design

Aside from being wildly compact, I was surprised by many of its physical features. The 3" LCD back panel is gorgeous, rendering sharp, colorful images using its 921,600 pixels. Not only is it a touchscreen as well, but it tilts using a clever hinged design that allows for low and high angle shooting, and for selfies.

The only knock against it is that I couldn't view the screen horizontally while wearing polarized sunglasses. That seems like a small thing, but it was a real bummer when working outside. I could either remove my sunglasses, or turn the camera vertically. This seems opposite of what it should be - one of the very few missteps I encountered during testing.

P7256364-gear-RX100.jpg

The popup .39" XGA OLED electronic viewfinder (EVF) has an impressive resolution of 2.36m dots for easy composition. The EVF also uses a ZEISS T* coating, to ensure clarity, and has a one-push access design for convenient switching between the LCD and EVF.

For as tiny as the EVF is, it's easy to use. And when you enable it via the "finder" switch on the side of the camera, it also powers up the device. There's also a diopter adjustment to calibrate the view to your eyesight. And, incredibly, readouts as well. I was wildly impressed with its performance.

Right beside the EVF is the popup flash. That's right, you get both. I wouldn't recommend it as the sole light source for a scene. But as a fill light, it comes in very handy.

And finally, the control ring around the zoom lens is very useful for changing the aperture in aperture priority mode, or for enabling program shift in program mode.

P7256366-gear-RX100.jpg

The LCD can be configured to your tastes, depending on how much info you want displayed, by cycling through the views via the display button. If you press the separate function button (Fn), a very nice screen overlay appears with options for most of the basic settings that you'd want, such as ISO, metering mode, and flash compensation setting.

Performance

In short, this is a very responsive camera. It powers up quickly, swiftly focuses, and has virtually no shutter lag. You're not going to miss many shots with the RX100 VI.

Lens and Image Quality

The Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar zoom is a beauty. This lens is comprised of 15 elements in 12 groups, 8 of them aspherical. That's right, 8 aspherical elements. The f/2.8 maximum aperture is welcomed at the wide end (24mm). But even when you zoom all the way out to 200mm, the maximum aperture is still a respectable f/4.5.

P7256374-gear-RX100.jpg

There's really no practical subject that you can't cover with this lens. I used the 24mm wide more often than I anticipated. But also zoomed in to 200mm optically, and could go even beyond that with clear image zoom (16X) and digital zoom (32X). Going whale watching? Not a problem.

The Jpeg files were sharp, contrasty and colorful. The detail was excellent. Quite frankly, they looked as I expected them to. The following files are at full resolution and straight out of the camera with no editing or enhancement.

Audi Wheel

Audi Interior

Close Up of Tribute

Detail of Tribute

I wasn't able to test the RAWs, because none of my apps could decode the new RX100 VI files. I do have them in storage, however, so I will be able to peek at them up the road.

Overall, an excellent performance for image quality.

Bottom Line

There is a lot to like about this camera... so much so, that it would probably take me two more articles to cover all of the stuff that I didn't get to here. And if you're looking for an ultra-compact all-in-one capture device, it's going to be hard to find a more capable machine.

That being said, the one thing that was missing for me was the physical experience of holding a more substantial camera. In other words, I missed the feeling of taking pictures with a camera that feels great in the hands.


Listen to My Hands-On Review! "Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All - TDS Photo Podcast 645" - http://thedigitalstory.com/2018/07/Sony-RX100VI-review-podcast.html.


This is not a knock on the RX100 VI. It was designed to serve as a marvelous compact for those who need a small form factor. And as such, Sony knocked it out of the park. And if that's what you need for business travel or vacation, I can easily recommend this camera...

... except for the one thing that I haven't talked about yet: its cost is $1,200. On one hand, it's totally worth the steep price tag. Combine the features, image sensor, and exceptional zoom lens, and you have a deluxe package that should command a premium price. But the fact of the matter is, $1,200 is a lot of money for a compact camera. And if you invest that amount of money, you'd better get your shots out of it, and that means using it more often than just during travel.

P7256373-gear-RX100.jpg

So, then, what is the answer to the question: Is it worth it? I can say, "Yes it is." But, is the Sony RX100 VI for you? Well, that depends on your credit card balance, disposable income, and yes, the most important person in your life who might see you using it and ask: "Oh, that's a cute camera. How much did it cost?"

The Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI digital camera is available now for $1,198.


Nimble Photographer Logo

The Sony RX100 VI digital camera has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Canon Rebates - Do They Deliver?

The short answer is: yes, but maybe not exactly the way you'd expect.

rebate-1024.jpg

When Canon offered a $250 "rebate" on its excellent PIXMA PRO-100 Wireless Professional Inkjet Photo Printer, I did not want to pass it up. My 13" Epson was DOA, and I needed a new output device. Problem was, I had experienced problems with Canon rebates in the past, and I was a little gun shy. I decided to give the program another chance.

I meticulously prepared my rebate package by cutting out the UPC code, filling out all the little boxes on the rebate form, and including my sales receipt. I checked the envelope address twice to make sure that everything was in order. Then I sent it off on June 11, 2018.

After a month, I hadn't heard anything and talked about the adventure on the TDS Photography Podcast. A few of my listeners suggested that I visit the Canon Rebate site and inquire about my submission.

I used the chat function on their site and was instructed to send an email to canonrebates@acbcoop.com. I did that, and a couple days later I received a response stating that my rebate had been approved and that I would receive a card in the mail. And sure enough, on July 24, 2018, I did. It took less than six weeks from start to finish.

What I received was a Canon Mastercard Prepaid Card for $250. I had to activate it at MyPrepaidCenter.com, which was easy. And I was given the option to set up an account to track my card's activity, which I did.

It's not really a rebate in terms of cash back. In fact, the two places you cannot use the card is at an ATM or gas station. But you can use it for a variety of purchases at most retailers. The expiration date is January, 2019.

So, yes, I have my rebate in the form of a prepaid card that has an expiration date. Not ideal, but not terrible either. Looks like I'll be doing my part to keep the economy healthy by going shopping with my new Canon Mastercard.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Aperture users who have aging libraries from the past don't need to keep nursing their geriatric host application to view, edit, and share those images. Photos for macOS can handle that job just fine.

When I bought a new iMac for my studio computer, I opted not to load Aperture on it. Instead, I have Photos for macOS, Lightroom, Capture One Pro, and Luminar. That computer is connected to two Drobos that house my images from the last 15 years. Many of those shots are inside Aperture "managed" libraries.

When I need to access content from one of those libraries, I simply double-click on the file container in the Finder. It will have the extension: aplibrary.

screenshot_17Aperture-Library-Original.jpg Original Aperture library.

The Mac launches Photos, and displays a Preparing Library... screen. The conversion goes at a good rate, ranging from just a few minutes to longer depending on the size of the library. Once Photos is ready with the content, it will display all of your previous Aperture images in its new interface.

iphoto-events.jpg Migrated Aperture library displayed in Photos for macOS. Notice how the original albums are displayed in the sidebar.

Your Aperture albums are retained and stored in a folder named: "iPhoto Events". From this point, you can use Photos editing tools, extensions, and all of the other goodies to manage your shots. Keep in mind that this converted library is not the System Library, rather a separate library. You can switch back and forth by quitting Photos, then holding down the Option key when relaunching the app.

Back at the Finder level, two things have happened. First, the file extension for the original Aperture library was changed to: migratedaplibrary. Then a second Photos library appears with the extension: photoslibrary. My recommendation is to archive the original library and use the new one for your current work.

migrated-library.jpg Back at the Finder level, you now have two versions of the original Aperture library.

This process is really easy, and you can move forward with your images using all of the Photos tools that I outline in my book, The Apple Photos Book for Photographers. Give it a try!

The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition

Updated for macOS High Sierra, the The Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Ed. provides you with the latest tips, techniques, and workflows for Apple's photo management and editing application. Get your copy today!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #645, July 24, 2018. Today's theme is "FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It makes total sense that the mirrorless revolution began without Canon and Nikon. On one level, that's what made it a revolution. FOPS - Fujifulm, Olympus, Panasonic, and later, Sony - previous underdogs, blazed the trail that many of us journey on today. But it was only a matter of time until the lords of the manor realized that they too must travel this road. And after a few notable detours, Canon and Nikon appear to be catching up. And when they do, the mirrorless revolution will enter phase two. But for reasons different than you might think. And that's our topic on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution

2018 is a Photokina year, and the perfect stage for both Canon and Nikon to show off their full frame mirrorless cameras. Nikon has already begun to tease their release. And I'm sure that Canon isn't far behind.

So what does this mean for mirrorless photography? For enthusiasts, I don't think much. Many Canon and Nikon ex-patriots have already found new homes. And I doubt most of them would ever go back. Pros who had previously dismissed mirrorless bodies, however, should be keenly interested in these new offerings.

But don't expect Canon and Nikon to release anything truly innovative. That's not their gift to the community. Their machines will be powerful, robust, and feature excellent image quality. Something a pro can depend on.

mirrorless-v2.jpg

The real change will be led by FOPS (Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, and Sony) and their response to the increased competition introduced by Canon and Nikon (Cankon). What might those changes look like? Here are 5 theories.

  • More Artificial Intelligence - This actually fights the battle on two fronts: smartphones and Cankon.
  • Seamless Smartphone Communication - We evolve from sending our images to our smartphones to just having them there.
  • Lower Price Points - FOPS already has a bigger mirrorless community base, so they should be able to leverage those numbers to offer more affordable hardware.
  • More Creative Modes - When you look at applications such as Luminar featuring alluring filters such as Image Radiance and Orton Effect, imagine if those filters were built into your camera?
  • Innovative Body Design - Mirrorless brought back the retro look. But they have other design opportunities as well, especially MFT bodies that can use smaller form factors.

Canon and Nikon re-entering the mirrorless space with quality products does not signal phase two of the mirrorless revolution in of itself. What they have already done with their saber rattling is to reenergize FOPS to take more risks and push their innovation envelope even further. And those four companies will lead the second wave of mirrorless.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 23, and still no rebate in sight. Here's what did happen this week.

I was urged by some listeners to visit the rebate site and check my status. I couldn't figure how to do that exactly, so I initiated a chat with one of their staff members. I was instructed to send an email to canonrebates@acbcoop.com - I did so only July 18. On July 20, I received the following response from them:

"Good Afternoon, You claim was received and approved. Please allow 1-2 weeks for card to mail." I'll keep you posted.

Testing the Sony RX100 VI

I had a nice surprise last week when the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI ($1,200) showed up at my door. It's a beautiful little camera with a 1" sensor and a 24-200mm zoom lens with a max aperture of f/2.8.

I'm shooting with it now, and I'm hoping to have a report as early as next week. Stay tuned.

Thanks for the Podcast Reviews

I recently asked folks to post a review on iTunes if they were so inclined to freshen up our list. Big thanks to Murlach, flatmacsurf, JohnF from CT, Fastidious 1, and Brook Craven for chiming in. Each wrote informative comments that will be truly useful to potential listeners. Awesome!

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I like the clean look of a white backdrop. For certain portraits, such as this springtime flower shot, they just look right.

Christina-White-Background.jpg "Christina with Flowers" - Photo by Derrick Story. Olympus OM-D E-M1 with Olympus 25mm f/1.2 prime lens.

The problem is, as any photographer knows who has hung a white sheet and snapped a few frames, is that the camera really doesn't see it that way. And suddenly your clean white backdrop looks dull and dingy.

I've tried all sorts of things, like bouncing lights directly off the background. But the system that finally gave me the results that I wanted turned out to be quite simple.

I started with a thin, white commercial backdrop that works with my frame system. I then placed a diffused light behind the material, illuminating it like a light box. Then, all I had to do was concentrate on the exposure for the subject herself.

If you're struggling with getting white backdrops looking bright and clean, consider this technique. It sure made my life easier.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Luminar Flash Sale - 3 Days - $49

Skylum is having a 3-day flash sale for Luminar 2018 (Mac/PC) for $49.

luminar-flash-sale.png

The latest version of Luminar 2018 for Mac and Windows brings many new features and improvements, such as the new Lens Correction and Transform tools, more impressive filters to stylize and enhance your photos, improved RAW engine, and much more.

If you're not familiar with Luminar, and want to learn more about it, visit their education page. I think you'll be impressed with what you see.

The Luminar flash sale runs for 3 days.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #644, July 17, 2018. Today's theme is "The Filter Box" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I'm not one to hang on to unused items. If a camera or lens isn't seeing action, then I move it along to someone who will put it to use. I do have one exception to this rule: filters. I store them in a large shoebox at my studio. And they are the one photography accessory that I seldom part with. Why is that? I answer that question on today's TDS photography podcast.

The Filter Box

I remember when I bought my first brand new polarizer. It was a 55mm Contax circular model. It cost some godly amount of money, even for day that was decades ago. I was fine spending $300 for lens. But then to turn around and add another $100 for a filter? That seemed crazy.

It was then, all those years ago, that I decided to protect and save my investment in filters. I knew that if I stuck to this approach, that it would save me thousands of dollars over my career.

IMG_2689.jpg

My photography is still going strong. And my filter investment is looking smarter than ever. Here are five reasons why.

  • Filters are brand independent - Over the years, I've jumped from Contax, to Canon, to Pentax, Olympus, Samsung, Panasonic, and others. The lenses are tied to the camera brand. But the filters are not. I can use a Canon filter on a Pentax lens no problem. And I do it all the time.
  • Filters cost a lot - Think about it: most filters are a cookie-cutter circle of optical glass, that's coated and usually mounted in a brass ring. Relative to the complexity of a camera lens, their price is way too high.
  • Filters last a long time - I have filters that date back to the 1960s that still perform well. I've read that they lose their effectiveness over time. To some degree, maybe. But not so much that they compromise my work. The thing about filters is that there is not focusing mechanism, aperture blades, or f-stop ring to break. So unless you strip their threads, they function.
  • Creative filters help shake up your photography - Whether it is a Zeiss Softar, Tiffen cinematic effects, or a rotating graduated filter - when I retrieve one from the box and pack it in my bag, fun just seems to follow.
  • Filters provide a sense of security - I'm always a little over protective when I get a new lens. The first thing that I do is put a good filter on it before I hit the road. And I always feel more secure after doing so.

Bickering over whether or not to use filters has been going on as long as photography itself. One thing that I do know is that quality, multicoated, filters have virtually no adverse impact on my images, and often provide some enhancement. Just like with lenses, get quality glass, and your investment will be rewarded.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 16, and still no rebate in sight. I will keep you posted....

My Incredible Scouting Trip to Lassen Volcanic National Park

I'm back from my scouting trip for Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park workshop and I had an amazing time. Here's the recap.

We have one seat open. This is the last opportunity to reserve before I go public next week. You're not going to want to miss this!

Review Copies Available for the Apple Photos Book for Photographers

I have 5 signed copies of the Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition, available. If you can post a review by August 15th, then send me your shipping info via the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. I'll get that book out to you right away. First come, first served.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

A welcome new feature in Luminar 2018 V. 1.3 Mac is compatibility with DxO's excellent FilmPack 5. Luminar users now can integrate all of those great film looks into their workflow.

DxO-plugin.png

save-button.png

No configuration is required. Simply open an image in Luminar, go to Plugins > Other > DxO FilmPack 5, and the handoff will automatically happen. Once you've finished working on the picture in FilmPack, click the Save button in the upper left corner, and the edited image will be returned to Luminar as an adjustment layer.

From that point, you can continue editing as you would with any project by applying blending modes, opacity adjustments, and of course, by tapping any of Luminar's Filters.

finished-shot.png

DxO FilmPack 5 compatibility is just one of the new features in the Luminar 2018 V. 1.3 Mac update. You can view the Mac Release Notes here. Windows users also have a slew of updates. You can view the Windows Release Notes here.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Physical Filters to the Rescue

filters-landscape.jpg

I spent the last few days on a scouting mission in Lassen Volcanic National Park. The primary goal of our mission was to find spots for an upcoming workshop, so we were moving quickly and exploring all times of day. To help tame the crazy light during this adventure, I used both a polarizing and rotating graduated filter on my Pentax KP DSLR with the super nimble Pentax HD DA 18-50mm zoom.

A common approach among many photographers is to tap software in post production for their adjustments instead of using filters at capture. I do both. I think using a polarizer, neutral density, or graduated filter at capture allows me to gather more information in the file that I can manipulate more easily in post production. It's the old adage: good data in, good data out.

Meadow Near Juniper Lake "Meadow Near Juniper Lake" - Pentax KP, 18-50mm DA zoom, handheld, f/14, 1/50, ISO 800, +1 EV, polarizer and graduated filters. Photo by Derrick Story.

One of the problems that I once had with stacking these filters was their density, causing me to lose 2-3 stops. This forced me to pull out the tripod, which would really slow things down on a scouting trip like this. But thanks to better high ISO performance with today's digital cameras, we can still stop down, handhold, and use filters. The above image is a RAW file recoded at ISO 800. I did not use any noise reduction in post, though I could have if needed.

I'm sure by this point landscape photography purists are pulling what remains of their receding hairline out. I don't care. I am not competing with them. I am a storyteller who travels light and wants good images to accompany my words. So yes, I'm using a cropped sensor DSLR with a compact zoom and a couple filters. And I'm having a blast.

My point is, that we all have a lot of options at capture. How you take advantage of those tools impacts the time you spend in post. In the case of this trip, two simple filters helped me stay nimble, both in the field and at the computer.

PS: If you're curious about an inexpensive graduated filter kit, take a look at the Bower 52mm Graduated Color Filter Kit to get your feet wet.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.