Recently in Photography

  Page 10 of 300 in Photography  

mirrorless-mover-25i-1.jpg

We're thrilled that Think Tank Photo is sponsoring the TDS San Francisco Street Photography Workshop in April 2017. They're providing a Mirrorless Mover 25i to each participant. What a perfect bag for nimble street photography!

This is the same bag that I used on assignment in Iceland, Washington D.C., and Las Vegas recently. The Mirrorless Mover 25i is "just the right size" for photographers on the go. It provides quick access to my Olympus mirrorless kit, iPad mini, audio recorder, and the accessories I need to get the job done.

mirrorless-mover-oprn.jpg Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 25i on assignment in Washington D.C. to cover the Wildspeak Conference.

The TDS San Francisco Street Photography Workshop begins on the evening of April 6 and runs through April 9. Our headquarters is the nostalgic Cartwright Hotel, right off Union Square in the heart of street photography heaven.

Over the span of three days, we explore the beauty and the grittiness of San Francisco, conduct class sessions in our private meeting room at the Cartwright, and enjoy the company of enthusiast photographers who rarely get to spend quality time together.

workshop-crew.jpg

We still have one seat open for this event. You can reserve your spot by signing up here. You'll learn new things, get great pictures, and score a brand new Think Tank bag too.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Pentax-KP-D-Story-web.jpg

The Pentax KP DSLR is an innovative, rugged, high resolution camera designed for active photographers who like innovation and portability.

This is the first installment of a multipart review that will help new owners get off to a great start with the camera, and hopefully answer questions for prospective buyers. Today's focus is learning to operate the top deck.

Top Deck

The first thing that you'll notice is that there is no LCD on the top deck. Instead, Pentax uses a Mode Dial (left side), Function Dial (right side next to the pentaprism), Setting Dial (right side, below the shutter button), Fx3 button, and the Capture Mode Selector (beneath the Function Dial) for controlling the camera. Changes can be reviewed on the 3" articulated LCD on the back of the body.

P2280243-Pentax-KP-top-deck-w-lens.jpg

To be honest, I have not missed the top LCD at all. And I like the clean, traditional look without it.

The Mode Dial on the left side should be intuitive for DSLR shooters. The are the traditional PSAM exposure options, plus full Auto and Bulb. Pentax adds Sv (Sensitive Priority that based on your ISO preference) and TAv (Shutter and Aperture Priority). You have to push the Mode Dial Lock Button in the center of the dial to change modes.

The Mode Dial also include 5 User Settings where you can create different combinations of settings and change to them quickly. This is handy for going from product photography, to landscape, to Black & White. You can name each of these, making it easy to keep track of them.

I recommend setting the Mode Dial to P as a starting point and default mode.

The Function Dial on the right side of the top deck is handy, but it takes some explaining since it's not a typical DSLR control. It has three pre-programmed settings: AE - AE Metering, rotate the Settings Dial to change metering patterns; HDR - HDR Capture, rotate the Settings Dial to selected the type of HDR capture you wish to use; and CH/CL - Continuous Shooting, rotate the Settings Dial to select the burst mode that you want to use. Pentax includes a Medium burst mode in addition to Low and High.

You can program the C1, C2, and C3 positions to you personal preferences. I've done so like this: C1 - Outdoor View Setting, rotate the Settings Dial to brighten or dim the LCD; C2 - EV Compensation, rotate the Settings Dial to change exposure compensation; and C3 - Bracket Value, rotate the Settings Dial to change Auto Exposure Bracketing. Pentax provides up to 5 stops for this function.

You can set the Function Dial to the white dot if you aren't interesting in using any of the functions. I recommend programming C1 for Outdoor View and using that as your default setting.

P2280255-Pentax-KP-right-side.jpg

The Fx3 button is pre-programmed for Exposure Compensation. And I recommend that you leave it that way. To change EC, hold down the Fx3 button and rotate the rear e-dail. Ergonomically speaking, I prefer to use C2 on the Function Dial and Settings Dial combination. It's easier for my large hands. But I leave Fx3 programmed for exposure compensation in case I need to use it when I have the Function Dial set to another adjustment.

You can program the Fx3 button by going to Menu > Tab 5 > Button Customization. There are seven different options available, including depth of field preview and change AF area.

The Capture Mode Selector Switch allows you to change from optical viewfinder, to live view (LV) to movie capture. Live View is quite handy with the Pentax KP because the articulated LCD swings up and down for different viewing angles.

If you like to use Live View, as I do often, I recommend that you set the AF Active Area parameter to User Selectable. This limits focusing to one active point that you can move around with the back jog dial. It's far more efficient that wrestling with the camera's choices during live shooting. You can make this change in the Menu > Tab 1 > AF with Live View > AF Active Area > SEL.

To enable this option while shooting in Live View, hold down the back OK button for a few seconds until the arrows appear, then use the four-button jog dial to move the focusing point. It works great, and is quite efficient.

The Pentax KP DSLR starting shipping this week for $1,099. In the next installment of this review, I will explain the ins and outs of the back panel controls. Until then, happy shooting!

More Articles About the Pentax KP

Pentax KP Review - Part Two - Back Panel - Looks at the buttons on the back of the camera and the menu system for the Pentax KP.

Pentax KP Review - Part Three - Image Quality - I programmed the KP to do the heavy lifting so I could focus on composition. Here's how the photos look.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #573, Feb. 28, 2017. Today's theme is "How Many Cameras Do You Really Need?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Over the years, I've had many people ask me, "So, how many cameras do you own?" I'm never sure if the motivation is pure curiosity, or if they're seeking rationalization for their own gear acquisition habit. But believe it or not, there is science to my inventory management. And that's the lead story for today.

How Many Cameras Do You Really Need?

twin-olympus-web.jpg

Photography is both my job and my hobby. So the spectrum of equipment is broad. At the most basic level, every time I walk out the door, I have at least one camera with me. It may be as nimble as an iPhone, or as complicated as a DSLR kit with multiple lenses and accessories.

So how do I meet these varied needs without filling my entire studio with camera gear? Efficiency and discipline. Here are my basic guidelines.

  • The Noah's Ark Approach - For each species I like to have two bodies. First, I always want a backup incase something goes wrong with my primary shooter. Plus, there are times I need to send in once camera for repair or cleaning. Having two equates to peace of mind.
  • Different Designs for Different Jobs - The basic formats that I use are smartphone, compact, mirrorless, DSLR, and 35mm film. Each of these are used during a typical week. Each has its strengths that I rely on.
  • Lens Sharing is Important - One of the primary reasons that I shoot Micro Four Thirds for my mirrorless is because of the extensive lens catalog that can be shared across both Panasonic and Olympus cameras. I've switched to Pentax for my DSLR work because I really like their 35mm film bodies, and I want lenses that work with both film and digital sensors. Having an efficient approach to lens management means that I can get by with less glass.
  • Keeping it Compact - My everyday bag is about the dimensions of a 13" laptop. Yet, I typically have three cameras inside: mirrorless, DSLR, and 35mnm. How does that work? I brands that I favor are very compact: Olympus and Pentax. That makes a big difference in a small space.
  • Selling What You Don't Need - Equipment management for me is a dynamic process. I upgrade as gear improves in the different categories that I use. But in order this to work, I must be disciplined enough to sell gear that is no longer mission critical. A perfect example of this was when I listed all of my Canon gear on Amazon during my transition to Pentax.
  • So how many cameras do I have? Well, I'm not saying. But you can do the math and probably come pretty close with a guess.

    In the News

    It's Never Over Until It's Over

    I was watching the Academy Awards last night and was reminded of a very important lesson. Well, a couple of them, in fact. The first being, just because it's never happened before, doesn't mean that it won't happen to you. And second, and an event photographer, it's never over until it's over... completely over. Imagine how you would feel if you were packing your gear as the executive producer for LaLa Land was making his acceptance speech? Wow.

    Dates Set for the Northern CA Coast Tour Workshop

    Good news for those wishing to join us for a tour up the Northern CA Coast. We've set the dates for this event: May 18-20th, 2017. Originally, we were planning this as a summer workshop. But after working with experts who actually live in the areas that we'll be working, we moved the event to late May. This provides us with Spring weather and far cheaper room accommodations.

    Those of you on the Reserve List will receive your personal invites later this week. You will have 10 days to secure your spot before we open up the event to the general public. If you're not on the reserve list, and would like to be, please visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

    Updates and Such

    Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

    B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

    And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

    See you next week!

    More Ways to Participate

    Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

    Podcast Sponsors

    MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

    Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

    The Nimbleosity Report

    Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

    Want to Comment on this Post?

    You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Luminar is an excellent portrait retouching tool thanks to its variety of adjustment filers and easy to use layer control. Here's a free video showing you how to quickly improve a portrait with this application.

luminar-portrait-retouching.png

Notice in the movie how easy it is to work with layers during the editing process. This is one of most outstanding features of Luminar

You can download a free trial of Luminar and see for yourself.

Photos for macOS as Your Digital Darkroom

You can learn more about using Luminar as an editing extension in my lynda.com training, Photos for macOS: Advanced Editing Extensions.

And if you'd prefer to cozy up with a book, check out The Apple Photos Book for Photographers that features chapters on basic editing, advanced post processing, and editing extensions.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Huge Olympus Sale plus Trade In Event

oly-em12.png

Olympus and B&H Photo have teamed up for a big sale and trade in event. Here are the discounted items with their URLs and promo codes.

Olympus E-M1 Mark II for $1,799

Olympus E-M1 Mark II for $1,799

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

=============

Olympus E-M1 II Digital Camera with12-40mm f2.8 PRO Lens for $2,498

Olympus E-M1 II with 12-40mm f2.8 PRO Lens for $2,498

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

==============

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO Lens $1,099

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO Lens $1,099

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

==============

Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO Lens $899

Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO Lens $899

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

===============

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-40mm f/2.8 Lens $1,598

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with 12-40mm f/2.8 Lens $1,598

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

===============

oly-pen-f.png

Olympus PEN-F Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera (Body Only, Black) $999

Olympus PEN-F for $999

Use Promo Code: TRADENTIME

===============

At the same time, they are running a special event. Trade in any camera and/or lens and get up to an $800 bonus (offer valid 2/26 - 5/6/17). You can get an overview of the event and see all of the specials here.

I've you've been thinking about the amazing E-M1 Mark II or the street savvy PEN-F, now is a great time to pull the trigger.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Working with Layers in Luminar

If you've been frustrated by layers in other image editing apps, maybe it's time to take a look at them in Luminar. It's a whole different ballgame there, and a much more enjoyable one too.

luminar-layers.jpg

The first thing that I noticed when learning about layers in Luminar, is that they work intuitively. In other words, If I guess that I can reposition a layer by clicking and dragging, it actually performs that way. So using these tools evolved from being the "L Word" to something that I truly like. Here's a movie that provides you with a nice overview of their functionality.

If you want to learn more about working with Luminar as an editing extension for Photos for macOS, I have a terrific resource for you: Photos for macOS: Advanced Editing Extensions, on lynda.com. And if you haven't downloaded Luminar yet, you can get it here.

Imagine having powerful layers controls built right into Photos for macOS. Who would of thought? Or, if you wish, you can use Luminar as a plugin for Lightroom, or as a standalone app. It's certainly changed my opinion about this type of editing.

Learn How to Streamline Your Image Editing

You can learn more about using Luminar as an editing extension in my lynda.com training, Photos for macOS: Advanced Editing Extensions.

And if you'd prefer to cozy up with a book, check out The Apple Photos Book for Photographers that features chapters on basic editing, advanced post processing, and editing extensions.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #572, Feb. 21, 2017. Today's theme is "1Frame4Nature with Alexandra Garcia ." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

After the WildSpeak Conference last November in Washington D.C., I had quite a few inquires about the best ways to get involved with conservation photography. I guess I wasn't the only one. So the folks at ILCP came up with 1Frame4Nature, and it's the perfect way to have your images published right alongside pro conservation photographers. And that's the lead story in today's TDS podcast.

1Frame4Nature with Alexandra Garcia

I met Alex Garcia last summer during her visit to California. During our interview, I was excited to learn just how accessible conservation photography can be. And as a result, I traveled to Washington D.C. in the Fall to cover the WildSpeak Conference.

PB165461-Washington-DCWildspeak-tds.jpg Conservation photographer Lucas Bustamonte presenting at WildSpeak 2016.

That event generated a lot of interest among those who want to use their photography skills to help protect our planet. And as a result, the 1Frame4Nature was conceived.

So Alex and I decided to team up for another interview to provide you with the inside scoop about this project. I hope you enjoy, and think about, what she has to say.

In the News

Canon debuts EOS M6 mirrorless with optional EVF (via DPReview):

Canon's newest mirrorless camera, the EOS M6, is a replacement for the entry-level EOS M3 and slides in directly under the enthusiast M5 (confused yet?).

It shares essentially all of the M5's internal components, including the 24MP APS-C sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF, Digic 7 processor and 3" touchscreen. It's also capable of 1080/60p video capture and has Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth.

Differentiating factors between are limited to the built-in EVF on the M5 and the flip-up selfie screen on the M6. The M6 gains an additional top plate control dial compared to the M3, which should improve handling.

Canon also announced an optional EVF (the EVF-DC2) for use with the M6. This 2.36M-dot EVF is smaller and lighter than the EVF-DC1 used by the M3, but do note that it does not tilt upward.

The Canon EOS M6 will go on sale in April 2017 in both black and silver. It will sell for $780 body-only, with the EF-M 15-45mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $900 or with the EF-M 18-150mm F3.5-6.3 IS STM for $1280. The EVF-DC2 is priced at $250 and also comes in black and silver.

Speaking of Canon...

Yesterday on The Nimble Photographer, I posted Canon: It's been a Good Run, the story about my selling the 5D Mark II and replacing it with then brand new Pentax KP DSLR with a Pentax DA 20-40mm f/2.8-4 ED Limited DC WR zoom lens. It's the end of an era for me...

Dates Set for the Northern CA Coast Tour Workshop

Good news for those wishing to join us for a tour up the Northern CA Coast. We've set the dates for this event: May 18-20th, 2017. Originally, we were planning this as a summer workshop. But after working with experts who actually live in the areas that we'll be working, we moved the event to late May. This provides us with Spring weather and far cheaper room accommodations.

Those of you on the Reserve List will receive your personal invites later this week. You will have 10 days to secure your spot before we open up the event to the general public. If you're not on the reserve list, and would like to be, please visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MindShift Gear - MindShift Gear is a group of committed professional photographers and product designers who support conservation and protection of our natural resources and planet.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

pentaxistdl.jpeg

As photographers continue to pour over spec sheets and feature sets for the latest high tech cameras, it's interesting to note that a fair amount of time has passed in this digital evolution. For most of us, it's been well over a decade since we depended on film as our primary capture medium.

Have we evolved as artists too? Who knows? My pictures aren't necessarily better today than in 2006, although I do think it's easier to capture a technically clean shot. And the envelope can certainly be pushed farther now.

So I began wondering what I could do with 2005 digital camera. To satisfy my curiosity, I purchased a Pentax *ist DL on eBay for $51. It had just been reconditioned, and included the latest firmware that was available (which means that I was no longer limited to 2GB SD cards... whew!).

For a week, the Pentax *ist was my go-to digital camera. I used a variety of lenses with it, including the Pentax-F 35mm f/2.0, Pentax-DL 21mm f/3.4, and Pentax-F 35-70mm f/3.5-4.5 zoom.

IMGP8997.jpg Pentax *ist DL with Pentax DA 21mm f/3.2 AL Limited, ISO 200, f/6.7. Photo by Derrick Story

To give myself every editing opportunity, I captured in RAW format, mostly in Program mode with occasional exposure compensation. I uploaded the photos to and processed them in Photos for macOS, that had no problem decoding the files. They also looked quite good in Capture One Pro.

IMGP8965.jpg Pentax *ist DL with smc PENTAX-FA 35mm F2 AL, ISO 400, f/2.0, 1/15th. Photo by Derrick Story

The 6MP sensor produced native file sizes of 3008 × 2008 (11.4 MB for RAWs). There weren't many spare pixels for cropping, but 3008 pixels on the long side wasn't terrible either. The RAW files responded well to editing as long as I didn't push the envelope too far. I could recover shadow and highlight detail, and the noise was well controlled at the lower ISOs (200-800).

IMGP8991.jpg Pentax *ist DL with Pentax DA 21mm f/3.2 AL Limited, ISO 200, f/6.7. Photo by Derrick Story

As far as the shooting experience itself, I was surprised at how much fun I had using the Pentax DL. The ergonomics were terrific, with the camera fitting nicely in my right hand. The function button allowed me to quickly change ISO, WB, drive mode, and flash. I set up the OK button to switch to 1-point AF from 3-point AF, plus I had buttons for exposure compensation and exposure lock.

IMG_2974.jpg Pentax *ist DL with smc PENTAX-F 35-70mm F3.5-4.5, ISO 200, f/5.6. Photo by Derrick Story

The back LCD is 2.5 inches, generous by 2005 standards. The autofocus was pretty good in a variety of lighting conditions... actually better than I had anticipated. And one of my favorite features is that the *ist DL is powered by rechargeable CR-V3 NiMH or standard AA batteries. Battery life has been great with the CR-V3, and my AA rechargeables even gave me a couple days worth of shooting. So no proprietary battery issues with this camera.

After-the-Rain-Web.jpg Pentax *ist DL with Pentax DA 21mm f/3.2 AL Limited, ISO 200, f/6.7. RAW file processing with the Luminar editing extension via Photos for macOS. Photo by Derrick Story

So, am I going to toss aside my micro four thirds kit and return to the days of yesteryear? Certainly not. But I enjoyed the creative experiment. In a lot of ways, as with my experiences with shooting film, it reaffirmed my skill as a photographer, regardless of the camera that I may be using at moment. In other words, I feel like I can make good pictures with any camera, even a 2005, 6MP DSLR that I bought on eBay for $51.

IMGP9010.jpg Pentax *ist DL with Pentax DA 21mm f/3.2 AL Limited, ISO 800, f/3.2, 1/20th. Photo by Derrick Story

PS: I'm keeping the camera. It's a blast!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Capture One Pro is one of the most powerful, flexible, photo management applications available. So powerful, in fact, that you may get lost configuring your catalog for optimal organization. If that's been the case for you, I can bring some clarity to your life, or at least to your photo management.

capture-1-library-mgmt-web.jpg

My latest lynda.com title, Advanced Capture One Pro: Library Management, shows you how to organize like a pro, covering techniques for referenced and managed catalogs, plus integrating sessions, backing up masters, and configuring your Capture One environment specifically to your needs. Take a look at this 1-minute introductory video for the course.

These techniques work for photographers using Capture One 8, 9, and 10. I have testing these approaches with my own Capture One catalog that manages my professional photography business. And I think that it will help you tame yours.

More Capture One Pro Tips and Techniques

Improve your skills by watching Capture One Pro Essential Training now available on lynda.com. More than 5 hours of tips, tricks, and techniques. Plus many free movies using advanced techniques.

I've also created a dedicated Capture One Pro Training page on The Digital Story. You can follow all of the tips and techniques that I publish in one convenient spot.

Thinking About Making the Transition from Aperture or Lightroom? - Download my free eBook titled, Rocky Nook's Guide to Moving to Capture One Pro. I show you the steps to create a test library, then build the foundation for a smooth transition to Capture One Pro.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

canon-77D-front.png

At first, you may be wondering why Canon would create a DSLR that sits between their Rebel and the 80D. And it's a great question. The best answer appears to be its super-charged autofocusing technology. Here's how Canon puts it:

The EOS 77D features an optical viewfinder with a 45-point All Cross-type AF system to help enable more precise focusing. In live view mode, the camera utilizes Canon's Dual Pixel CMOS AF to deliver the world's fastest AF focusing speed of 0.03 seconds. This technical achievement allows users to find their subject, focus accurately, and capture the shot more quickly than ever before.

Then add these highlight specifications:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
  • DIGIC 7 Image Processor
  • 3.0" 1.04m-Dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen
  • Full HD 1080p Video Recording at 60 fps
  • Up to 6 fps Shooting and ISO 51200
  • Built-In Wi-Fi with NFC, Bluetooth
  • RGB+IR 7560-Pixel Metering Sensor

So, you have a high performance DSLR that will be available for $899 - a good price for these specs.

The EOS 77D should be a tempting choice for weekend sports shooters who need this type of accuracy and responsiveness to capture the action.

You can preorder the Canon EOS 77D now. Expected availability is March 30, 2017.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.