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This is The Digital Story Podcast #579, April 11, 2017. Today's theme is "f/2.8 and Be There" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of the more interesting conversation threads during our SF Street Photography Workshop was about motivation. Our photographers would talk about periods of time where life overtook their art, and during those stretches, the camera seldom saw the light of day. On the flip side, however, it was interesting how quickly they could build momentum once they set aside some time for their camera work. Getting there is half the battle, and how to do that is the topic of today's show.

f/2.8 and Be There

P4091047-SF-chinatown.jpg

First, you may be wondering why I wrote f/2.8 and Be There instead of the traditional f/8 and Be There. It has to do with mirrorless cameras and diffraction.

Now that we've got that squared away, how about that motivation thing? Well, here are a few suggestions.

  • Don't rely too much on your smartphone - Yes, they are convenient, and they do take great pictures. But they also get us out of the habit of making real photography decisions. When possible, carry a traditional camera with you as well - and shoot with it during your daily life moments.
  • Get more exercise outside - Gyms are great for shredding it, but not very good environments for photography, especially if you wish to retain your membership. You need to get outside as well for your workouts (walking, biking, jogging) and take a traditional camera with you.
  • Secure photo time within family time - You don't want photography to drive a wedge in your family life. But you do need to set aside time specifically for your craft. So if you're off on a week long vacation, negotiate before you leave for a few mornings and/or evenings when you can focus on your craft.
  • Spend time with other photographers - The exchange of views and ideas among photographers truly helps keep the creative juices flowing. Workshops, camera clubs, and photo buddies will encourage you to make time for shooting when you might have otherwise settled for another activity.
  • Create projects with deadlines - After everyone in the house has settled down for the night, you can spend some time working on your personal projects. Activities such as organizing, planning, editing, and sharing stimulate the brain. Thinking about your photography before you go to sleep may yield a new idea when you wake up.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air heads to San Francisco where it joined our group for an evening shoot at the Embarcadero.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

The Olympus PEN-F in San Francisco

I just published an article titled, 5 Reasons Why the Olympus PEN-F Crushed it in San Francisco, and I thought I'd share those with you now, plus a few additional tidbits.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

We still have one seat open for our Road Trip workshop. And reservation invitations for the TDS Autumn in Wine Country workshop will go out within the week. If you'd like an invitation to either event, visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The Olympus PEN-F is a creative force for everyday use, but it truly shines in an urban environment. And I was once again reminded of its street photography prowess this past week in San Francisco. Here are five reasons why.

olympus-pen-f.jpg

Nobody Cares

I could stand right in front of people with the PEN-F in hand, and neither I, nor the camera seemed to present any type of threat. Having this ability to stay off the radar for my photo subjects provided me tremendous freedom to capture the world at ease.

P4090287-SF-pen-f-proximity.jpg "Shopping in Chinatown" - Olympus PEN-F with 14-42mm EZ, ISO 200, f/5.0, 1/125th, Color Profile 3, -0.7 exposure compensation. Photo by Derrick Story.

Color Profile 3

To say the PEN-F captures amazing color is to state the obvious. I programmed the color setting on the front dial to "Color Profile 3" for my morning in Chinatown. Later that night when I was comparing the SuperFine Jpegs to the RAW files, I was impressed with the film-like color in the Jpegs with the Color 3 setting. In many cases, they seemed like completely different shots.

P4090253-SF-pen-f-color.jpg "Chinatown Alley" - Olympus PEN-F with 14-42mm EZ, ISO 200, f/6.3, 1/200th, Color Profile 3. Photo by Derrick Story.

Vertical Shots with Hat On

Because the viewfinder is on the far left, I can shoot vertical images with my baseball cap remaining in place. All I have to do is lower the right side of the camera and keep the viewfinder on the top. I love this technique.

Derrick-Story-by-Carl-Shortt.jpg "Derrick Story in Chinatown" - Photo by Carl Shortt.

Mono Profile 2

When it's time to shoot B&W, I set the front dial to Mono Profile 2. Using the front dial with my preprogrammed profiles makes switching from color to B&W a breeze. And the gritty TRI-X like tones produced by the Mono Profile 2 are quite engaging for street photography.

P4080052-SF-pen-f-monochrome.jpg "Cable Car Exit" - Olympus PEN-F with 9mm Body Cap Fisheye, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/25th, Mono Profile 2, +0.3 exposure compensation. Photo by Derrick Story.

Fully Articulated LCD

There were so many shots where I had to lean far in one direction with my arm extended far above my head and the LCD screen angled downward so I could compose the shot. And when I wasn't using the screen, I could turn it inward so it was protected from the rigors of street photography. The PEN-F LCD is beautiful, sharp, and extremely functional.

P4080039-SF-pen-f-lcd.jpg "Making Room on the Cable Car" - Olympus PEN-F with 9mm Body Cap Fisheye, ISO 1600, f/8, 0.4 seconds, Mono Profile 2, +0.3 exposure compensation, handheld above my head. Photo by Derrick Story.

The Bottom Line

The Olympus PEN-F ($1,099) is an urban photographer's dream camera. Its supreme craftsmanship, handsome looks, intelligent brains, fantastic image quality, versatility, and compactness provide a great shooting experience and impressive results.

If you're a fan of mirrorless cameras, this one should be on your short list for urban photography.

Duets

Sometimes the theme for the day picks you. As we were exploring downtown San Francisco yesterday as part of the TDS SF Street Photography Workshop, I noticed couples, tandems, and juxtapositions everywhere. Here are a few of my favorites.

P4070018-SF-Web.jpg "Looking for Union Square" - After I captured this image, I walked up to this couple and asked if I could help. He said that they were looking for Union Square. Fortunately, they were only two blocks away. So I pointed them in the right direction. Photos by Derrick Story.


P4070080-SF-Web.jpg "Relationships are Work" - Sometimes you just have to work things out. This couple spent some time in the park doing just that.


P4070121-SF-Web.jpg "Walking Arm in Arm" - It was a coolish afternoon on Market St., and it gave this couple an opportunity to stroll close together.


P4070711-SF-Web.jpg "We're Definitely Not Together" - The park accommodates everyone, and it's interesting to see folks in contrast to one another.


P4070716-SF-Web.jpg "You Do Your Thing, and I'll Do Mine"

Today, we ride the cable cars seeking new themes and images in one of my favorite cities to photograph. Stay tuned for what we find next.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The members of The Digital Story virtual camera club who are heading to San Francisco for the Street Shooting Workshop have packed their rain gear and are ready for a true urban adventure.

IMG_1057.jpg

Gritty streets, wet pavement, colorful umbrellas... we might work harder over the next few days, but the payoff is going to be excellent. All of our Think Tank Mirrorless Movers have an excellent weather-resistant design and rain covers as well (every workshop participant gets their own bag).

My Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II is weather resistant as well, as are the lenses that I'm packing with it. I've added a protection filter to the front of each optic so I can wipe it off easily in the rain.

IMG_3211.jpg

Plus, I'm bringing my red Olympus TG-4 that not only is totally weather resistant, it will geotag all of my images. The TG-4 captures in RAW, and its image quality is excellent.

We're also going to add some inspiration to our week by visiting the Diane Arbus exhibit at the newly renovated San Francisco Museum or Modern Art. Each workshop participant receives a full general admission pass to SFMOMA as part of their tuition. And we have our reservation there for first thing Friday morning. That will get the creative juices flowing.

I'll let you know how we fare in the rainy weather. And we'll be sharing images as well. So stay tuned.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #578, April 4, 2017. Today's theme is "Becoming Part of the Story" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I find it interesting that photographers often are absent from the stories they tell. Whether it be a family vacation, a gathering with friends, or a somber occasion, we tend to record everyone but ourselves. But as the storyteller, we are most likely part of the narrative too. And exploring how we can better integrate ourselves is the subject of today's show.

Becoming Part of the Story

IMG_3189.jpg

It would be easy to blame this on selfies. And what I mean by that, is that most serious photographers don't want to be caught photographing themselves with their iPhones.

But when you think about it, why not? If we capture an image of us interacting with others in the story, or on location, why is that a bad thing? It doesn't mean that we're a narcissist.

This came to mind again this weekend when I was testing the Roadtrip Air, which I'll talk about in the next segment. I had joined a group of hikers learning about the San Andreas Fault. And if I hadn't taken a shot of me, I would have had everything relating to the activity except for the storyteller himself.

So, here are a few reasons to force yourself to turn the camera in your direction.

  • The artist is often as interesting as the art he creates.
  • So often in movies and TV shows, the storyteller narrates the tale, even if he or she isn't shown on camera. Why? Because it's interesting.
  • If you're the photographer in the family, and you never include yourself in the images, then you haven't done a good job of recording history.
  • There's an art to self-portraiture that is worth learning. Who better to capture a portrait of you, than you?
  • And finally, if you use your smartphone to capture a self-portrait, you're also recording the location data, which can be applied to the other images from the event.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air focuses on removing the center column and using it as a bluetooth-controlled selfie stick.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

The Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art Sample Gallery

In this article posted on DP Review, they wrote, "Recently the new Sigma 135mm F1.8 Art landed in the office, prompting us to get out there and shoot some portraits... from a distance. While one of their heavier primes, performance is exceptional wide-open with very quick focusing. What about that background blur? Take a look at our samples to find out."

The sample images are quite good, and very interesting. I talk about them in this segment of the show.

The Nikon version will be available on April 25, 2017 for $1.399. And the Canon version should be ready by April 6 for the same price.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

We still have one seat open for our Road Trip workshop. (The SF workshop and Rail Adventure have sold out.) If you'd like an invitation to either event, visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Global Filters in Capture One Pro

If you shoot RAW+Jpeg, as many of us do these days, then you should know about Global Filters in Capture One Pro.

global-filters.jpg

They allow us to quickly hide various file types - RAW, Jpeg, PNG, Tiff, Video - so that we're only viewing the images we want. So if I have an upload that contains RAWs, Jpegs, and Video files, and I only want to see the movies, I can use Global Filters to temporarily hide the RAWs and Jpegs. Here's a short movie that shows you how this works.

One of the primary reasons I moved from Aperture to Capture One Pro was because of its robust and easy to use image catalog. Global Filters are just another example of how C1 improves my photography life.

Take Control of Your Capture One Library

My lynda.com title, Advanced Capture One Pro: Library Management, shows you how to organize like a pro, covering techniques for referenced and managed catalogs, plus integrating sessions, backing up masters, and configuring your Capture One environment specifically to your needs.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

As a working photographer who moved from Canon to Pentax for my DSLR work, expectations were high for the KP and its DA lenses. After month of working with the camera, I can easily say that I'm happy with the transition.

P2280265-Pentax-KP-kp.jpg

First, the Shortcomings

Let's get the nits out of the way. The battery is too small and runs out of juice earlier than most photographers would expect. I understand that Pentax was designing a DSLR to be as compact as possible. And they succeeded. But by also providing us with removable grips, they lost that space that could be used for a bigger battery. Was it a good tradeoff? That depends on the photographer. I love the removable grips, so I'm not complaining too much.

The Mode Dial lock button must be pressed every time to change exposure modes. A more clever design is to push it down to lock, then push again to let it pop up and unlock. There are times when I want to be able to change modes freely without fiddling with the button.

P2280243-Pentax-KP-kp.jpg

There's only a single SD Card slot. Again, I know that compactness was a top design priority. But I feel like this is a pro camera. And as such, dual SD card slots would be appropriate.

Other reviewers have cited cons such as "heavy weight" and disappointing continuous AF. I don't know about that. I never hear anyone complain about the weight of a Leica. And I wouldn't have selected the KP for sports photography anyway. This is a camera designed for the outdoor photographer on the go who wants high quality in a compact, weather resistant package. As such, I've been fine with the AF.

What I Like

This list is much longer. For starters, I love have the option for DNG or PEF RAW files. It's wonderful not having my RAWs held captive by processing software. With the DNGs, I've been able to use any app for post production.

The top deck is beautiful. Having the guts to not include a top LCD panel resulted in a clean, classic design. I haven't missed the top LCD for a second. I don't have one on my mirrorless bodies, and I don't need it on my DSLR either.

The interchangeable grips are great. I'm opting for the larger one most of the time because it feels so good. But if I want to slim down with the 21mm prime, for example, I can do so with the medium grip as well. Cool idea that's also quite functional.

P2280234-Pentax-KP-kp.jpg

I came to love sensor-based image stabilization with my Olympus cameras. And it's just as wonderful on the Pentax KP. Their 5-axis Shake Reduction system works for both my state of the art DA limited optics, as well as my vintage Pentax-A and Pentax-F lenses. I like not having to pay more for an optical stabilized lens. I can use any type of glass that will mount to the camera, and have it stabilized.

The popup flash is well designed and works great. It stands up taller and is handy for fill flash portraits on the go. I don't use flash often, but like everyone else, when I need it, I need it. And not having to carry a separate unit is a blessing.

These is plenty of customization via the programmable buttons and dials. Pentax spent a lot of time figuring out the user experience for this camera, and it's paid off handsomely. The KP is a true pleasure to shoot with.

I've used the articulated LCD in Live View mode many times, and it's such a nice feature to have on a DSLR. There are a variety of focusing modes you can access in Live View. I like the selectable point for product work, and face detection for portraits. And with face detection, you have access so special features such as Skin Tone, which reads the subject's skin and provides some lovely softening and color adjustment.

And finally, there's the image quality. It's flat out terrific. The Pentax DA Limited optics are excellent, as is the sensor and image processing pipeline. And the fact that I can capture beautiful shots at ISO 1600, 3200, or even 6400, provides me with more opportunities than ever before.

Prior to purchasing the Pentax KP, my interest in DSLR photography had waned, opting for my mirrorless bodies most of the time. But now, I feel like I have a more complete photography toolset to draw from. And I can truly choose the right camera for the job, and enjoy doing so. I highly recommend the Pentax KP.

More Articles About the Pentax KP

Pentax KP Review - Part One - Top Deck - An overview of the Mode dial, Function dial, and other controls on the top panel of the camera.

Pentax KP Review - Part Two - The Back Panel - An overview of back panel controls and the menu system for the Pentax KP.

Pentax KP Review - Part Three - Image Quality - A hands-on look at how the camera performs with Pentax Limited Edition optics.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Think Tank Signature 13 Review

Without doubt, the Signature 13 is the best looking shoulder bag Think Tank has ever designed. And as you'd expect, it's as functional as it is handsome.

IMGP0055-Signature13-web.jpg

Significant Features

The soft shell feels like a fine woolen suit, but it's actually an advanced technology fabric that's both durable and weather resistant. The dual top flap system consists of a nylon lined zipped cover that can be closed in bad weather or for security reasons, and a fold over messenger flap that is latched with dual metal buckets.

IMGP0031-Signature13-web.jpg

The expandable front pocket is closed by a leather strap with a metal snap button that also contains a zipped pocket inside of it.

IMGP0028-Signature13-web.jpg

Inside the main compartment are two sleeves, one for a 13" laptop, and another behind it for a tablet, notepad, or book. The camera compartment is completely lined and includes fabric-covered dividers that can be configured in a variety of styles.

IMGP0034-Signature13-web.jpg

On the back of the bag is another zippered pocket and a trolly sleeve. The leather bottom protects the contents, and the bag, when set on a damp surface. The wide strap features a neoprene pad with leather trim and metal hardware.

IMGP0045-Signature13-web.jpg

Other niceties include leather top handle, dedicated smartphone pocket, detachable fitted rain cover, and a button to secure the inner top flap to the main flap to keep it out of the way when not in use.

Who is the Signature 13 for?

The Signature 13 is an ideal everyday work bag for mobile photographers who need their office and camera gear in a stylish carrying solution that's as comfortable in a business meeting and it is next to you in an Uber Black.

Personally, I wouldn't choose this bag for a day of street photography, opting instead for the Retrospective 7 or similar shoulder bag. But as an everyday bag that's both compact, yet holds plenty of gear, the Signature 13 is top shelf.

IMGP0042-Signature13-web.jpg

Currently, I have a MacBook Pro 13", iPad mini, Pentax KP DSLR with Pentax 20-40mm HD zoom, Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II with Panasonic 20mm f/1.7, Pentax ZX-5n with Pentax-F 35-70mm zoom, extra lenses, and plenty of accessories. All of this was in the bag when I photographed it for this review. So you can see that it can accommodate plenty of gear, and still maintain its svelte lines.

IMGP0025-Signature13-web.jpg

Final Thoughts

I like the way this bag sits squarely on the table without listing forward or backward. The dual top flap system provides exceptional protection and looks great doing so. The adjustable strap is very comfortable, and the top handle feels great when you need to grab the Signature 13 out of the trunk or from an overhead compartment. And I know that I've mentioned this a few times now, but this shoulder bag is very easy on the eyes.

The Signature 13 is my companion to work, meetings, Starbucks, and on the road. Personally, I like the buckles and snap buttons instead velcro. If you have similar tastes, you'll most likely love this bag.

The Signature 13 is available now for $279.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #577, March 28, 2017. Today's theme is "What Good is a System that Doesn't Work?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One of my favorite Jerry Seinfeld routines polks fun at the system failure of car rental agencies. "Anyone can take a reservation," he says. "It's the holding of the reservation that's important." At work and at home we are constantly creating routines and systems to manage our lives. But if put to the test, do they really work? We'll explore in more detail on today's show.

What Good is a System that Doesn't Work?

P1035834-robot-web-v2.jpeg

In this first segment, I begin by telling a story of an actual event that happened to my mother. Then go on to explain how it illustrates, what I consider, a critical system failure.

The MeFOTO Roadtrip Air on Assignment

This week's three-legged adventure with the MeFOTO Roadtrip Air focuses on how its compact size allowed my to carry it all day in my svelte Retrospective 7 while working day and night at the Artisan Cheese Festival in Petaluma, CA.

Just to give you a bit of background about this super nimble tripod, it's distinguishing features include:

  • Super Fast Setup with the new HyperLock Leg System. Setup is as easy as 1,2,3: 1 - Hold tripod leg and twist counterclockwise until it stops (4 clicks), 2 - Pull the leg to the desired length, 3 -Twist leg clockwise until it stops. (How easy is that?)
  • Perfect for Selfies - removable telescoping center column converts to a Selfie Stick with included smartphone holder and Bluetooth remote!
  • Ultra lightweight - 30 percent lighter than classic MeFOTO models
  • Available in Backpacker, RoadTrip, GlobeTrotter models and 7 colors.

If you want to learn more about the MeFOTO line of tripods, look for the colorful tile on all the pages of the thedigitalstory.com. And if you decide that you want one for yourself, use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY to save 10 percent and receive free shipping.

The Stylish Think Tank Signature 13 Luxury Bag

I've been carrying the Think Tank Signature 13, and I have to say, it is as beautiful as it is functional.

The fabric is soft, like a fine wool suit, but it's also durable and weather resistant. To complement the fabric, they've incorporated leather accents and metal hardware. The overall look is very professional. Other features include:

  • Full-grain leather bottom and detailing, plus antique finished metal hardware
  • Zippered flap provides full closure and security to the main compartment, or tucks away when not in use
  • Dedicated laptop/tablet compartment that fits a 13" laptop
  • Dedicated phone pocket fits up to an iPhone 6s+ or S7 Edge
  • Dividers and bottom foam can be removed for a completely collapsible bag

Inside my Signature 13, I have my 13" MacBook Pro, iPad mini, Pentax KP with 20-40mm zoom, Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, Pentax ZX-5n SLR, extra lenses, and plenty of accessories. The Think Tank Signature 13 sells for $279.

Updates and Such

Big thanks to all of our Patreon members! I was able to pay for the podcast server and the backup system from last month's pledges. Your contributions are making a positive impact.

We still have one seat open for our Road Trip workshop. (The SF workshop and Rail Adventure have sold out.) If you'd like an invitation to either event, visit the TDS Workshops Page and use the Send Me Info form.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members.

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

MeFOTO Air Tripods - MeFOTO Air Tripods are a nimble photographer's dream.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

capture-one-import.jpg

If you're running a managed catalog in Capture One Pro, you have the option of customizing file names on import. I use this feature 99 percent of the time because having both the original image number and additional data makes it easier to keep track of my pictures once they leave the cosy confines of the C1 environment.

Capture One handles this task through the use of tokens. They are metadata building blocks that you can arrange in any order. My favorite combination is: Image Name-Job Name. The first token retains the original file number, while the second is an editable field that allows me to include a descriptive word or two in the file name itself. Here's a short video that shows how I do this.

Another way I use this functionality is to add my name to the file name itself when I deliver images to a client. Even though my copyright info is in the metadata, I've discovered that many PR folks don't dig very deeply when using my photographs. Having my name in the file name increases the odds of a photo credit in the caption.

If you're a Capture One Pro user, it's worth building a strategy for enhancing the file names of your images. We're in a bumper sticker society, and the more visible your vital info is, the better.

Take Control of Your Capture One Library

My lynda.com title, Advanced Capture One Pro: Library Management, shows you how to organize like a pro, covering techniques for referenced and managed catalogs, plus integrating sessions, backing up masters, and configuring your Capture One environment specifically to your needs.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.