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Favorite Photo Gear of 2005

Nikon P2
The Nikon P2 is among my favorite photo gear selections for 2005. Read on for more...

Lots of great hardware was released in 2005. So much in fact, that I don't have time to list it all. But I certainly have my favorites. Here's my short list of the best of the best.

Nikon Coolpix P2 -- This beautiful compact camera takes great pictures providing you with 5 megapixels of resolution, a Nikkor 36-126mm glass lens, 2.5 inch LCD monitor, and WiFi connectivity. In other words, it's a great Nikon compact that allows you to wireless connect to your computer or printer. The P2 is also one of the few compact cameras that gives you decent control of the aperture. Not bad for less than $399.

Canon Digital Rebel XT (350D) -- I have lots of cameras, but this light, powerful digital SLR body is my absolute favorite for casual shooting. The 8-megapixel CMOS sensor, compact body, and tasteful design makes it as beautiful to hold as the pictures it produces. You can pick one up with an 18-55 mm lens for less than $899.

iPod video with Camera Connector -- Talk about having your music and your photos too. The latest iPod is a great digital music device, can play video, and is a wonderful storage container for your photos. If you purchase the $29 Camera Connector, you can upload images directly from your camera to the iPod for backup and storage on the go. For less than $300, you have a terrific camera accessory and the best digital music player on the planet.

Not a bad lineup. Soon I'll post my favorite software of the year too.

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Car Window Photography

Car Window Photography

When you find yourself on a road trip, be sure to keep your camera handy. Car window photography produces images that have an entirely different feel than other shots.

Objects in the foreground will show motion blur while the landscape remains relatively sharp. This juxtaposition gives the viewer a sense of motion -- something that we don't typically see in travel shots.

Keep in mind, however, that it's best to let someone else drive while you're taking pictures. No shot is worth finding yourself stranded in a ditch by the side of the road...

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Remember the Self-Timer Setting!

Self Timer Group Shot

Don't leave yourself out of group shots. Remember to use the self-timer setting on your camera so you can join the action. First set up the shot, put your camera on a steady surface (tripods are the best), check the focus, enable the self-timer, press the shutter, and run like the dickens to get in the shot -- you have about 10 seconds before the exposure is made.

If you can, position your camera within flash range (10 feet) and use fill flash, as in this sample shot. You'll find that it puts a little extra twinkle in the eyes.

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Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas

Red Tree

Photographers are better prepared than most for pulling last minute gifts together. Here are a few ideas to get the creative juices flowing.

  • Gift Certificate for Family Portrait -- Here's a sure-fire way to score points with the relatives. Whip up a quick gift certificate for a family portrait taken by you. You can promise a few prints plus the images on CD. If you have an extra 8" x 10" picture frame around, you can mount the certificate in there with a note: Your Family Portrait Here!
  • Photo Lessons for that Budding Photographer -- While you have the printer fired up, you can generate another gift certificate for 5 Photo Lessons for that budding photographer who is getting a digital camera for the holidays. Someone else buys the camera; you provide the lessons.
  • Preload Family Album on Color iPod -- Do you know someone getting a new iPod? You can preload a family album on it before wrapping it. That way when they open the iPod, it will be ready for viewing from the get-go. Be sure to put the pictures on CD too so the recipient can load them into his or her iPhoto album when they sync the iPod to their computer.
  • Be a Holiday Photographer -- If you listened to Podcast #12, you know there are lots of advantages to being the holiday photographer. Add another one to the list... you can offer it as a gift.
  • Framed Enlargement -- When all else fails, you can print out a nifty 8" x 10" print and mount it in a frame. Try to choose a subject that is of interest to the recipient. And make sure it's a top quality photo! That being said, these gifts can be home runs...

If you have other last minute gift ideas, please post a comment and share it with our readers. Also, don't forget to check out More Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas. Happy Holidays!

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Ziploc Bags for Cold Weather

Ziploc Bags

During cold weather, make sure you have at least one Ziploc bag in your camera case. Not only are they useful for protecting your equipment in the rain, but they help with condensation too.

Bringing a camera in from the cold weather to a warm house promotes condensation forming on the outside of its body, possibly migrating to the inside of the camera where it can confound electrical components. To prevent this mishap, place your camera in a Ziploc bag before coming inside. Leave the camera in the sealed bag until it reaches room temperature. The condensation will collect on the bag, not your camera, thereby protecting your investment.

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Stephen Johnson at Apple Store, SF

Stephen Johnson

Stephen Johnson, digital landscape photography pioneer, will be speaking at the SF Apple Store on Dec. 27, 7 p.m. Stephen will discuss his groundbreaking digital landscape photography project, "With A New Eye." You'll learn about the concept, tools, inspiration, and means for accomplishing this massive 8-year project.

I've had a chance to visit Stephen at his gallery in Pacifica, CA, which is just south of San Francisco. His work is magnificent. If you're in the Bay Area on Dec. 27, spend an hour with Stephen Johnson. The visit will get your creative juices flowing.

I took this photo of Stephen at his gallery while he was showing me a section of his massive print of the New York City skyline that he captured before the Sept. 11 attack. The image of the twin towers was haunting... for both of us.

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"Sunglasses" Polarizer in a Pinch

Sunglasses Polarizer
Top photo recorded with a compact digicam and no filter. Bottom image captured using sunglasses as a polarizing filter...

Most of us don't carry all of our photo accessories when we're on the go with our compact camera. But, if you have a quality pair of polarizing sunglasses, you can use them as a polarizing filter in a pinch.

The top image was taken without any filter. Good color, for sure, but I really wanted more intensity in the foliage and sky. So I placed one side of my polarizing sunglasses right up against the camera lens and recorded another image. The polarizing effect of the sunglasses deepened the blue sky, gave the clouds a little more "snap," and saturated the colors of the trees.

Keep this tip mind the next time you're out shooting grab shots with your compact camera. You might be surprised by the results.

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Kodak Easyshare Printer
Dye sublimation printers provide us with archival 4"x6" prints from our digital cameras within minutes.

For years now I've wrestled with inkjet printers to produce the lingua franca of amateur photography: the 4x6 print. I've used Epsons, HPs, and Canons, only to meet the same frustrating fate. It just takes too much fiddling around to squeeze out a few borderless snapshots. Don't get me wrong, I've had great results producing colorful business forms and 8"x11" enlargements. I expect to spend a little more time on those types of output. But 4"x6" prints, whether from Photoshop, iPhoto, or directly from the camera, should be fast and simple.

So, I began researching dye sublimation printers (dye sub, for short). Not the big ones that cost lots, but those little portable units that specialize in snapshots. They use dye sublimation thermal transfer printing. After you send the image to the printer, the paper makes four passes across the printing element. The first pass is yellow, and you don't see much image detail at this point. With magenta, the second pass, it begins to look more like a photograph but not a pretty one. After the third pass, cyan, the image snaps to life and looks beautiful. Most printers add one more layer, a coating that protects against UV rays and moisture. A very nice touch! You can actually run water across these prints without damaging them. And the images last for years and years.

Many camera systems, such as Kodak, Olympus, and Canon, have matching printers for their cameras. However, if your digicam has the PictBridge protocol, it should be able to communicate with any PictBridge-compatible printer. So shop around. Here are a few models to get you started:

Canon PowerShot S2 IS
The Canon PowerShot S2 IS is the current favorite choice among those who ask me for camera advice.

As you can imagine, I get lots of inquires this time of year concerning the best camera to buy. For those who are looking for an all-in-one prosumer model, the Canon PowerShot S2 IS has been the model most often selected among the options I present. Why do people like this camera? The 12X optical zoom combined with image stabilizer is appealing in a package that is light to carry around. 5 megapixels is enough resolution for most folks, especially considering that they won't have to do much cropping thanks to the optical zoom range. And the street price of $450 is within reach of most camera-buying budgets.

I do think the S2 is a terrific camera. That's why it's on my short list of consumer recommendations. But the news here is how popular it's been with people who actually plunk down their hard earned dollars.

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Shooting Through Hotel Glass

NYC Times Square

You travel photos aren't limited to locations where the tour bus stops. One of the first things I do, after dropping my suitcase on the bed, is look out the hotel window for a photo opportunity. Bright, colorful lights from a high vantage point often translate into beautiful nighttime images.

If your hotel window doesn't open, and they usually don't, just apply the standard "shooting through glass" technique. I like to first put a rubber lens hood on the camera to protect the front of the lens, but it isn't necessary if you're careful. Dim the room lights, or turn them off all together (so you don't get reflections in the window), then position the front of the lens barrel as close to the glass as possible. Make sure you turn your flash off. Then hold the camera very steady and shoot a couple frames. If you get camera shake because of the low light, then increase the ISO to 400 or 800 and try again. You can use a tripod if one is handy.

These types of images are particular good for "establishing shots" at the beginning of slideshows. And they often capture the interest of your viewers from the get-go.

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