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Turn Off Photos for OS X Auto Launching

It's an aggravation that many photographers just don't want: having to manually quit Photos for OS X every time a memory card is connected to the computer. But it doesn't have to be that way.

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The scenario goes like this: you insert a memory card or connect your camera to a Mac running El Capitan, and the import dialog for Photos for OS X pops up begging for attention. This is great if your intention is to import into Photos. But if not, that's annoying.

If you use the same image capture device all the time, the fix is easy. Just uncheck the box next to "Open Photos for this Device." The problem is, depending on how your memory cards are formatted, or if you use a variety of cameras, you'll still experience the unwanted import dialog.

Fortunately Melbourne-based photographer Ben Fon published an easy fix on Petapixel that uses the following command applied in the Terminal app:

defaults -currentHost write com.apple.ImageCapture disableHotPlug -bool YES

The Terminal app is located in your Utilities folder, and the process is as simple as opening the app, pasting this command in there, pressing Enter (the return key), and closing the app. I tested it, and it seems to work just great (Thanks Ben!).

I suspect that Apple may provide us with a user friendly fix up the road. If they do indeed, then you can turn off this action by going back to the Terminal app and typing:

defaults -currentHost write com.apple.ImageCapture disableHotPlug -bool NO

Of course, if you use Photos for OS X as your primary picture management application, then you probably don't care about any of this. But you may be interested in learning more about using Photos. If that's the case, be sure to take a look at Photos for OS X Essential Training on lynda.com.

More Help and Insights on Photos for OS X

And don't forget about the Photos for OS X Special Feature Section on The Digital Story. It's a roundup of tutorials, videos, and articles focused on helping you master Apple's latest photo management software. You can also find it under Photography in the top nav bar.

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Every now and then I use a bag and think to myself, "These guys thought of everything." That's the case with the new Tenba Cooper Luxury Canvas 13 Slim Camera Bag. This messenger caught my eye when first announced, in large part because of its handsome design. Now I've had a chance to test it for a week.

I like it because it is indeed slim: only 5.5" deep, so it hangs at your side like a bag should. Even when I pack it full of gear, including two mirrorless cameras, lenses, MacBook Pro 13" laptop, iPad mini, and accessories, it holds its shape.

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The peach-wax cotton canvas is soft to the touch and looks great. The hardware complements the fabric perfectly including real leather trim, brushed metal fasteners, and an attractive front zipper that also serves as an accent. Inside, the protective camera compartment is removable, allowing for quick relocation to a hotel safe and enabling the Cooper to be used as a regular messenger bag.

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You don't have to raise the front flap to access your gear. A top zipper allows for quick retrieval of a camera or lens. In fact, everything is easy to find. I keep my iPad in the front compartment, laptop in the back, and camera get in the center area. I can quickly reach everything via a zipper.

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Speaking of which, the 13" laptop is stored in a separate back compartment. This makes it very easy to remove when going through airport security, yet it's against your back for protection. And if you're thinking that might not be comfortable in transit, that has not been the case for me. I keep the iPad mini in the front compartment for quick access.

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Inside the bag there are plenty of individual compartments for smaller items. If you pull down on the front flap before lifting it, the velcro-like fasteners are virtually silent. It's a nice touch. I'm stashing an OM-D E-M5 Mark II and a Panasonic GM5 in the main compartment. I've added a couple of lenses too. There's also plenty of room for my accessory pouch, glovers, pens, etc.

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This Cooper Slim goes beyond being just practical, however. Every detail from zipper pull, to trolly sleeve, to leather bottom has been designed with great care. The side pockets have vertical zippers so you can place the item inside, then zip up to secure it. Really smart. And I've relocated the pad for the shoulder strap to the carry handle. This makes the grip even more comfortable, and if I need the pad on the shoulder strap, I can relocate again.

The bottom line is that I plan on using this bag for years to come. Since it's only 14.5" wide, I can take it anywhere. If the weather turns bad, it includes a form fitting rain cover, and when I sit it down on the table at a business meeting, it's handsomely appropriate for that occasion too.

The Tenba Cooper 13 Slim is now available for $229. And if you need a bigger version of this bag, Tenba makes that too.


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The Tenba Cooper 13 Slim has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

Don't Forget to Shoot the Food

Amid the present unwrapping and rekindling of old memories, family gatherings usually feature a healthy serving traditional fare. And as such, those memories are worthy of capture too.

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The combination I used during our Thanksgiving celebration was the Panasonic Lumix GM5 with the Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 II prime lens. This cake shot was at ISO 800, f/1.7, 1/60th of a second, with exposure compensation set to +1/3. I set the camera right on the table for a dramatic angle.

I also found a good reference article for this sort of thing: 18 food photography tips for the holidays. If nothing else, it will send you to the fridge for a snack.

The bottom line is that attractive food shots add a lot to the holiday story. And in many cases, family recipes are a treasured (and delicious) part of those memories.

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The Vello FreeWave Fusion Basic Wireless Flash Trigger System for Canon or Nikon cameras provides wireless flash and remote firing at an affordable price. I've been testing the Canon version with my 5D Mark II, using it for both outdoor flash photography and as a handy way to fire the camera from a distance.

The basic features include:

  • Frequency: 433 MHz
  • Flash Triggering Range up to 50'
  • Shutter Triggering Range up to 150'
  • Dual-Function Shutter Release
  • Five-Second Delay Mode on Transmitter
  • Single, Continuous, Bulb, & Timer Modes
  • One 23A & Two AAA Batteries Included

The kit comes with a variety of cables to connect the receiver to your camera. This enables the wireless trigger function.

vello-1.jpg Kit comes with everything you need.

vello-3.jpg System set for off-camera flash.

There is no TTL control, so flashes with manual settings are best for this rig. Both the transmitter and receiver are well designed, easy to operate, and fairly robust. And I think it's particularly cool that you get dual functionality from a single set.

The Vello FreeWave Fusion Basic Wireless Flash Trigger System is on sale for only $29.95 through Dec. 17, 2015 at B&H Photo. After that, it's still quite affordable at $39.95.

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #510, Dec. 15, 2015. Today's theme is "Photo App Smackdown." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

So I've been promising everyone that I'm going to make a photo management decision by the end of the year. And true to my word, I have a trio of apps that will fill my toolbox in 2016. And that's what the focus of today's show will be.

Photo App Smackdown

It's difficult for me to replace Aperture with just one application. At the same time, this is an opportunity for me to broaden my horizons. My photography today is different than a decade ago, and weaving these three apps together satisfies my needs right now.

Core Management App: Capture One Pro 9 operating as a managed Catalog.

Cloud Based App and Video Organizer: Photos for OS X for backing up my iPhone photography, sharing online, video management, and plug-in fun.

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Fast Turnaround: Exposure X for sorting through a memory card quickly, rating images, applying edits, and sending photos along their way.

I explain my reasoning behind all three of these apps in today's feature story.

In the News

FAA Announces Drone Registration Date - c't Digital Photography

Registration for unmanned aircraft begins Dec. 21, 2015, says the FAA in a recent press release. This new requirement applies to owners of small unmanned aircraft (UAS) weighing more than 0.55 pounds (250 grams) and less than 55 pounds (approx. 25 kilograms) including payloads such as on-board cameras.

The normal registration fee is $5, but in an effort to encourage as many people as possible to register quickly, the FAA is waiving this fee for the first 30 days (from Dec. 21, 2015 to Jan 20, 2016). The form is online and can be completed at www.faa.gov/uas/registration.

Clean Out the Cruft

I've been testing CleanMyMac 3, and I have to tell you, I love this app. Using the Smart Clean feature, I removed 20GBs of cruft from my MacBook Pro.

Glow QuadraPop Portable Softbox

I don't know if you saw my review of the Glow QuadraPop Portable Softbox, but this is a nifty lighting accessory sold by Adorama. The kit comes with an adapter ring that you insert the flexible aluminum rods into, then expand it to a full 24" wide by 34" tall - a nice surface area for waist up portraits.

I originally tested it with a strobe. But I've since figured out how to mount a LCD light inside, and I'm digging it even more. I'll use it again for an upcoming portrait shoot on Wednesday.

The Screening Room

This week's Screening Room selection is Photos for OS X Essential Training with yours truly.

In this title I show you the ins and outs of this maturing application from a photographer's point of view. I explain how to use the new and sophisticated geotagging function. And I demonstrate the editing extensions, which provide an open door to this application that third party developers are using to add powerful new features.

Member Quote of the Week

Intelligent comments culled from The Digital Story Facebook page.

In regard to Monday's Facebook Post: Our 10 Favorite Film Cameras of All Time (by Shutterbug Magazine) - Rob Costain wrote: "I moved from Kodak Instamatic to an Olympus OM-10 in 1981, but my favourite camera of all is still the used Olympus OM-2 that replaced my OM-10. The OM-2 is small compared to its contemporaries and you can see why the Olympus E-Mx series is such a hit. I don't use my OM-2 much anymore, but I still keep it loaded with film."

Post your thoughts on our Facebook page. Believe me, I read them.

Adobe Lightroom Notecard and Greeting Card Templates

If you use Adobe Lightroom, Red River Paper has a collection of Fine Art Card Templates that you can download and use to simplify creating your greeting cards. They're free, and there are even tutorials on how to use them.

Found Treasure

The next edition of The Nimbleosity Report comes out this Wednesday, Dec. 16. You don't want to miss this issue! Sign up today to get in on the action.

Registration is open for The 2016 Street Photography Workshop in San Francisco. And I've posted the full preliminary itinerary on the Workshops page. And if you plan on ordering through B&H Photo or Amazon, please stop by the TDS site first, click on their respective ad tile, then place your order. That extra step helps support the site.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

lynda.com - Learn lighting, portraiture, Photoshop skills, and more from expert-taught videos at lynda.com/thedigitalstory.

Red River Paper -- Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

inkdot Innovative printing output and accessories for the creative photographer. Visit www.inkdot.com today.

MacPaw Creators of CleanMyMac 3 and other great software for Apple computers. Visit www.macpaw.com today.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

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The first thing I noticed after setting up the Glow QuadraPop 24" x 34" Portable Softbox was how light it was. My testing rig consisted of a Sunpak flash (with manual adjustments), wireless trigger, and Manfrotto light stand. Once assembled, the setup felt very balanced and easy to move around.

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The QuadraPop is designed for portability, making it a good choice for home studios and location work where it needs to be collapsed and expanded quickly. The kit comes with an adapter ring that you insert the flexible aluminum rods into, then expand it to a full 24" wide by 34" tall - a nice surface area for waist up portraits.

film and camera 1.jpg

The flash and trigger (or hard wire if you use that) mount on a sliding rail. Position the flash so the head is inside the softbox. The light is modified by twin diffusers: one inside the unit, and the other attached using velcro on the outside. I would rate the output at medium hardness. It's flattering for portraits, but retains an edge. The results that I liked best used a reflector on the fill side of the subject.

Because the QuadraPop is so light, and it really is, it's also a good choice for product shooting when you'd want to position the unit on top of the item facing down. It balances well on a standard boom, and is easy to position. You could also have an assistant simply hold it.

The mounting unit can be adapted to a variety of flash units and moonlights via its custom interchangeable ring adapters. The UV-A and UV-R diffuser materials and are heat resistant, an the non-fluorescent dyes protect the fabric from that aging yellow cast that we've seen happen to some of our older modifiers. The reflective surface inside is quite bright, and it appears durable too.

I selected the rectangular shape for my work, but it's also available as an octagon or round. And sizes range from 20" to 38" on the widest side.

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The Glow QuadraPop 24" x 34" Portable Softbox is currently on sale for $128 (normally $160). That's a good value considering its portability, ease of setup, and quality materials.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The one thing I learned while working on Photos for OS X Essential Training is that there's more to this application than I realized... especially after the new El Capitan release.

In this title I show you the ins and outs of this maturing application from a photographer's point of view. I explain how to use the sophisticated geotagging function. And I demonstrate the editing extensions, which provide an open door to Photos allowing third party developers to add powerful new features.

Take a look at the overview movie and table of contents. Then you might want to revisit this intelligent photo app that's right under your nose.

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More Help and Insights on Photos for OS X

And don't forget about the Photos for OS X Special Feature Section on The Digital Story. It's a roundup of tutorials, videos, and articles focused on helping you master Apple's latest photo management software. You can also find it under Photography in the top nav bar.

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

With the recent release of iOS 9.2, camera-toting snapshooters can use the Lightning to USB Camera Adapter ($29) to transfer images from practically any digital camera to an iPhone.

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We've had this capability with iPads, but iPhones were previously left out of the party. Now everyone can play.

This would have been more helpful a while back before WiFi became prevalent with our digital cameras. But it's still a welcome feature for those who have non-WiFi devices they want to connect to iOS 9.2 phones.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

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This is The Digital Story Podcast #509, Dec. 8, 2015. Today's theme is "Personal Projects." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

One thing leads to another. In my case, wondering what I was going to do with 16 rolls of Fujicolor Pro 400H that had been occupying the bottom bin of my refrigerator since 2007. That along with the need to come up with a topic for my weekly Rocky Nook post led to The Film Project, the main theme for today's show.

Personal Projects

As satisfying as photography is as a creative expression and demonstration of technical prowess, I think by bringing these elements together in a personal project we can elevate the satisfaction even higher.

In this segment, I talk about The Film Project in particular, and personal projects in general.

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In the News

Dropbox to Shutter Its Carousel Photo App - PetaPixel

"Back in April 2014, Dropbox announced Carousel, a photo app for archiving and sharing personal memories via a Dropbox account. Now, less than two years later, Dropbox is announcing that Carousel will soon be no more.

Carousel will be shut down by March 31st, 2016, a month after Mailbox, the email app that Dropbox acquired in 2013.

Neither app gained widespread popularity over the past couple of years, and Dropbox says that it's now focusing more on solutions for "collaboration and simplifying the way people work together."

Clean My Drive 2 is Available Today

MacPaw team is releasing CleanMyDrive 2, a free cleaner of external drives. CleanMyDrive 2 will also be available on Mac App Store. New features include:

  • Completely redesigned user interface
  • File copying to any disk with drag-and-drop simplicity
  • Detailed storage legend for every drive
  • Mount and unmount notifications
  • Automatic disk eject on system sleep initiation
  • Keyboard shortcut for mass disk eject
  • Improved hidden service files cleanup
  • Automatic cleanup on every disk eject
  • Setting custom disk icons from our beautifully crafted sets

CleanMyDrive 2 requires OS X 10.10+ and 12 MB of free space. The app is free, though in-app purchases are available (fun icon packs can be purchased). Visit macpaw.com/cleanmydrive to download CleanMyDrive 2, or find it in the Mac App Store.

How Do I Do That in Lightroom Book Winners

Congratulations to Jennifer Johnston and Brett Jackson for being selected to receive How Do I Do That in Lightroom by Scott Kelby. They were chosen from the subscriber list of The Nimbleosity Report, a twice a month newsletter with inside scoops and discounted deals. (Did you all enjoy last week's edition?)

The Screening Room

This week's Screening Room selection is Exploring Composition in Photography with Taz Tally. In this course, photographer and educator Taz Tally details four pillars of effective, impactful composition: simplicity, asymmetry, eye lines, and point of view. Through example images and helpful graphics, the course discusses not only the things you can do to enhance composition when you're shooting, but also improvements you can make using imaging software such as Lightroom.

Member Quote of the Week

Intelligent comments culled from The Digital Story Facebook page.

In regard to Sunday's Facebook Post: Canon should make a digital mirrorless version of its famous AE-1 camera - John P. Wineberg wrote: "I've been thinking this regarding the Nikon F system. The Df didn't quite cut it. The reason I was drawn to the Fuji XT1 was it resembled the size and form factor of my FE2."

Post your thoughts on our Facebook page. Believe me, I read them.

Get in the holiday spirit with Red River Paper's greeting cards

Imaging-Resource writes: "Considering the cost of greeting cards in stores, Red River's greeting card selections are a great value and an excellent way to share some of your images for a personal touch." The entire article is informative and definitely worth a read.

Found Treasure

Wood Prints from inkdot.com - They are 5/8" thick and printed on Baltic Birch. They are archival, moisture, and UV resistant. They take two days for printing, then of course ship time. Sizes range from 6" x 6" to 24" x 36". And they make a crazy attractive gift.

Registration is open for The 2016 Street Photography Workshop in San Francisco. And I've posted the full preliminary itinerary on the Workshops page. And if you plan on ordering through B&H Photo or Amazon, please stop by the TDS site first, click on their respective ad tile, then place your order. That extra step helps support the site.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

lynda.com - Learn lighting, portraiture, Photoshop skills, and more from expert-taught videos at lynda.com/thedigitalstory.

Red River Paper -- Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

inkdot Innovative printing output and accessories for the creative photographer. Visit www.inkdot.com today.

MacPaw Creators of CleanMyMac 3 and other great software for Apple computers. Visit www.macpaw.com today.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Lightroom Mobile has upped the ante for nimble photography by enabling access via a web browser on any computer connected to the Web. Lightroom Mobile users simply have to log in to https://lightroom.adobe.com, and just like that, their Lightroom Mobile environment is available.

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And it's not just viewing your images... you can also use a fairly robust set of editing tools to adjust pictures. All of this can come in handy when traveling ultralight. Let's say that you're at a friend's house and want to show off a few shots from a recent trip. Just go to his computer, log in to your account, and there it is. Check it out!


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Lightroom Mobile has a high Nimbleosity Rating. What does that mean? You can learn about Nimbleosity and more by visiting TheNimblePhotographer.com.

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You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.