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Our cameras are important investments for us, and photographers who use Olympus for their work just received nice upgrades for their gear.

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Olympus just announced a series of new firmware updates that are available immediately for several of its latest interchangeable lens cameras. The firmware upgrades include Version 2.0 for the flagship Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, Version 3.0 for the Olympus PEN-F, and Version 4.0 for the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II.

All three cameras receive the new Bleach Bypass Art Filter option that was included in the OM-D E-M10 Mark III (released in September 2017). This option replicates the bleach bypass effect used to develop film creating images with a beautiful metallic sheen. And all three now support the Panasonic LEICA® DG ELMARIT 200mm/F2.8/POWER O.I.S. interchangeable lens.

From there, enhanced functionality varies by model. For example, the OM-D E-M5 Mark II now has the In-Camera Focus Stacking function, where the focus is shifted in half-pixel increments while capturing eight images, which are then composited to form a single image that is in focus from the foreground to the background. A total of eight lenses are supported (the same lenses supported by OM-D E-M1 Mark II Firmware Version 2.0).

On the PEN-F, it is now possible to save Monochrome and Color Profile Control settings in images recorded on the PEN-F to the camera via a computer. Using the latest Olympus Digital Camera Updater (Ver. 2.1), simply select the image with the profile you want to use and save the settings to the camera.

And for the OM-D E-M1 Mark II, there are a number of enhancements, including improved Pro Capture Mode functionality, Focus Stacking now supports the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS PRO, small AF Target setting added to S-AF and C-AF, Continuous AF (C-AF) performance has been improved, remaining battery level icon has been fine-tuned, and a lot more.

You can review the details for your specific camera by visiting the Olympus Firmware Upgrade page, where you can also click for the appropriate software.

Download your new camera today!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #624, Feb. 27, 2018. Today's theme is "Canon, Fuji, and Pentax Make Big News" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

The Canon EOS M50, Pentax K-1 Mark II, and Fujifilm X-H1 are all very different cameras. But the one thing they have in common is that they are all recent announcements. Can we speculate about where the camera industry is going by examining these? We take a closer look in today's TDS Podcast.

Canon EOS M50

The Canon EOS M50 will sell for $899 with kit lens and will be available on March 26, 2018.

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The Canon EOS M50 is an entry-level mirrorless camera that features an electronic viewfinder, fully articulating touchscreen, single control dial and a 24MP APS-C sensor - the same used by its M-series siblings. It has Canon's latest DIGIC 8 processor and offers expanded Dual Pixel AF coverage, 4K/24p video capture (1.6x crop) as well as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC.

  • 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor
  • Dual Pixel autofocus for stills and video
  • DIGIC 8 processor
  • 2.36M-dot OLED EVF
  • 1.04M-dot vari-angle LCD
  • 7.4 fps burst in AF-C (10 fps in AF-S)
  • 4K/24p UHD video (1.6 x crop)
  • 1080/60p and 720/120p HD video
  • Wi-Fi and NFC with Bluetooth
  • 235 shot-per-charge battery live (via CIPA)

Source: DP Review.

I think the biggest appeal is for photographers already shooting Canon being able to use existing lenses with an adapter.

Pentax K-1 Mark II

The Pentax K-1 Mark II will sell for $1,996 is will be available on March 11, 2018.

The K-1 II's main addition is an 'accelerator unit,' which is a pre-processor that sits between the 36MP CMOS sensor and the PRIME IV image processor. Ricoh says that this pre-processor increases the signal-to-noise ratio, thus reducing noise, which implies it's a a noise reduction process. Ricoh told us that the accelerator unit, which was found on other Pentax models like the K-70, was not ready for the K-1 when it launched.

Thus, the company has increased the top ISO to 819,200 - a big jump from 209,400 on the original model. We'd be shocked if anything near that ISO is usable, seeing how the K-1 looked at 209,400 (hint: poor, like all cameras in its class), but we'll find out soon enough.

The K-1 Mark II can, of course, still use the Pentax DA lenses designed for the company's APS-C cameras. By default the camera will use a 15MP APS-C-sized crop of the sensor if a DA lens is mounted but can be made to use its full sensor region, if you'd prefer. Ricoh has published a list of those lenses that will produce relatively useable results in full frame mode, if the aperture is stopped down.

  • 36.4MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
  • PRIME IV Image Processor
  • 3.2" Cross-Tilt LCD Monitor
  • Full HD 1080p30 Video Recording
  • SAFOX 12 33-Point AF Sensor
  • Native ISO 819200; 4.4 fps Shooting
  • Pixel Shift Resolution II
  • 5-Axis In-Body Shake Reduction
  • Built-In Wi-Fi & GPS; Dual SD Card Slots
  • Weather-Sealed Magnesium-Alloy Body

For a limited time this summer, current Pentax K-1 owners will be able to send their cameras in for service, essentially upgrading them to a Mark II. The service will include a main circuit board swap, and the 'SR' logo on the front of the camera will be replaced with a Mark II logo. The upgraded circuit board will add all of the features introduced in the Mark II, such as shooting at up to ISO 819,200 and an updated Pixel Shift mode.

The K-1 upgrade service will cost $550 US / $690 CAD and will be offered from May 21, 2018 to September 30, 2018.

The upgrade will be available for the same period in Europe at a cost of £450 in the UK and €500 across the rest of Europe.

Source: DP Review.

The Fujifilm X-H1

The Fujifilm X-H1 will sell for $1,899 and will be available on March 1, 2018.

The X-T2 offers 4K video, but the X-H1 takes things to a different level. Virtually every aspect of the X-H1's video feature set is upgraded compared to the X-T2. Thanks to its larger internal volume it can shoot 4K for longer (15 mins compared to 10), and while the two cameras both impose a modest 1.17X crop, the X-H1 boasts a maximum bitrate of 200Mbps and the option to shoot F-Log internally.

The X-H1's new 'Eterna' film simulation preset is intended to provide a quick and easy way to shoot gradeable, wide dynamic range video footage. For the first time, you can apply dynamic range 'DR' expansion settings in video mode on the X-H1, too. When combined with the DR400%, setting, Fujifilm says that footage shot using the Eterna preset should deliver a total of 12EV of dynamic range.

While it uses the same 24MP APS-C X-Trans sensor as the X-T2, the X-H1's on-sensor phase-detection autofocus system has been seriously upgraded. The most obvious improvements are to low-light sensitivity and focus tracking. The X-H1 can now focus down to -1EV (compared to the X-T2's limit of 0.5EV) and phase-detection AF should work even at effective apertures as small as F11 - i.e. when shooting at the long end of the XF100-400mm F4.5-5.6 zoom, when combined with a 2X tele-converter

Source: DP Review.

  • 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III Sensor X-Processor Pro Engine
  • 5-Axis In-Body Image Stabilization
  • Internal DCI 4K Video and F-Log Gamma
  • 0.75x 3.69m-Dot Electronic Viewfinder
  • 3" 1.04m-Dot 3-Way Tilt LCD Touchscreen
  • 325-Point Intelligent Hybrid AF System
  • 1080p at 120 fps; Flicker Reduction Mode
  • 1.28" Sub-LCD Top Screen
  • Weather-Sealed Body; 2 UHS-II SD Slots/
  • Same sized battery as the X-T2

I really like the top deck LCD. I think it looks great and is truly useful.

Coming Up: Build Your Digital Darkroom with Photos (And Get a Free Signed Copy of My New Book)

Our next Nimble Classroom is on March 10, Build Your Digital Darkroom with Photos. Here's why you might want to attend.

Come Join me at the Skylum Photography Public Group

I'm now moderating the Skylum Photography Public Group, and I would love to have interested members from our audience join me there.

The San Francisco Street Photography Workshop Update

I've published an informative article on the San Francisco Street Photography Workshop that you may want to take a look at.

San Francisco Street Photography - April 26-28, 2018 - We'll work entirely on location in San Francisco. Our hotel in picturesque Union Square will serve as our headquarters during the event. No rental car will be necessary. We'll explore the City's hidden treasures and capture them through our lenses. As always, we're adding new shooting locations again this year, including twilight assignments. This is San Francisco like you've never seen it before. And as a bonus, Olympus Visionary Mike Boening will be joining the teaching staff and leading sessions on street shooting and night photography. Two instructors, three days, and all for just $695. (That's right, it's 3 full days in one of the most photogenic cities in the U.S.)

New! TheFilmCameraProject on Instagram

I've started a new Instagram feed just for film camera lovers. It's called TheFilmCameraProject, and it's for those who appreciate the beauty of analog SLRs.

And to celebrate the launch, I'm giving away one Pentax SLR and lens to one lucky follower of TheFilmCameraProject. All you have to do is follow the feed by Feb. 28, 2018. I'll then do a random drawing and announce the winner on the March 6 podcast. Join in the fun, and get to admire some really beautiful camera along the way.

Updates and Such

I now have the dates for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Be sure to get on the Reserve List for this one!

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Videoblocks - Go to videoblocks.com/digitalstory to get all the stock video, audio, and images that you can imagine for just $149. Save on millions of studio-quality clips, tracks, and graphics.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Take a Drive

Today's post is obvious, common sense, and anything but profound... and yet we get caught up in distractions and forget to: grab your camera and go take a drive.

take-a-drive.jpg "Sonoma Coast at Bodega Bay" - Pentax KP with HD DA 18-50mm zoom. Photo by Derrick Story.

So at the risk of stating again what we all know: take a drive, capture some pictures, then come home and play with them. The chores can wait.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Between the outstanding editing extensions such as Luminar 2018, and the new Edit With command in Photos for macOS High Sierra, you can design a customized, powerful, and fun digital darkroom for cheap. In my upcoming online Nimble Classroom titled, Build Your Digital Darkroom with Photos (Saturday, March 10), I show you how.

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And if that isn't thrilling enough... Each member of this Nimble Classroom will received a signed copy of my new Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition, which is throughly updated for the current version of the app. Participants also receive all the video modules from the live class, so they can be reviewed and referred to as often as wanted.

As of this writing, there are only 4 seats left for this Nimble Classroom. If you want to participate, sign up today.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Olympus-Comparison.jpg

For the longest time, traveling light with an interchangeable lens camera meant working with a prime lens. But optical technology continues to improve, and now nimble photographers have a limited selection of zooms that are just as compact as their prime counterparts. Here are two fine examples.

The HD PENTAX DA 18-50mm f/4.0-5.6 DC WR RE ($297) and the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ ($199) with accessory LC-37C Auto Open Lens Cap ($29) are as compact (or even more so) than most of their prime counterparts. Yet, these optics provide moderately wide to mild telephoto fields of view, making them excellent choices for photographers on the go who want to travel light.

I took both of these optics out for a spin one Sunday morning. No other lenses were with me, so it would be make or break with these zooms. I used a Pentax KP DSLR ($896) and an Olympus PEN-F ($1,199) mirrorless as my camera bodies. Both of these are compact in their own right, and are perfect hosts for these optics.

Mustard in Vineyard "Mustard in Vineyard" - Pentax KP DSLR with HD PENTAX DA 18-50mm f/4.0-5.6 DC WR RE captured in Program mode as a DNG. Photo by Derrick Story.

Pentax-Zoom-Comparison.jpg

The Pentax compact zoom was released a couple years ago. It received mixed reviews from users, not so much for its optical performance, but because of its usability. You have to press a button on the left side of the lens, then rotate the collar before you can take a picture. At first, this seems a little cumbersome. But I figured out that there's a grip on the opposite side of the collar for the opposing finger. Once you hold it according to design, the lens opens right up.

As for image quality, I was really impressed. Colors are tremendous. I didn't use any filtration for these images. They were sharp and saturated at capture. On close inspection, center sharpness was excellent, and edge sharpness was very good. Focusing is extremely fast. The lens is very light because of its plastic body. Some users prefer metal. But its this very design that makes it as light as it is compact. In short, this is a wonderful optic for outdoor use, perfect for travelers and those who want a compact DSLR package.

Victims of the Tubbs Fire "Victims of the Tubbs Fire" - Pentax KP DSLR with HD PENTAX DA 18-50mm f/4.0-5.6 DC WR RE captured in Program mode as a DNG. Photo by Derrick Story.

The Olympus kit performed well also. Because it is a micro four third body and lacks a mirror, it's even more compact than the Pentax KP. If you don't mind an electronic viewfinder instead of an optical version, you can save even more room with this package.

Mustard with Dormant Vines
Olympus PEN-F with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 EZ.

In fact, this pancake zoom is more compact than most prime lenses for micro four thirds. One of its clever tricks is that it auto extends when you power up the camera. If you add the accessory LC-37C Auto Open Lens Cap, then it's ready to shoot in a second. This combination is particularly effective for street photography and travel. You can stash the PEN-F in a jacket pocket while exploring, but be ready to shoot in just a second or two. Image quality is very good, again with a little tradeoff on the edges.

The Bottom Line

Both of these optics have a high nimbleosity rating and are excellent performers as well. Street photographers and urban travelers would appreciate the convenience of the PEN-F kit. Those who love the visual beauty of an optical viewfinder can travel light as well with the Pentax KP kit. And if landscape photography is your thing, this DSLR is hard to beat.

We're no longer limited to prime lenses for compact, lightweight travel shooting. These zooms, and others like them, are truly game-changers.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #623, Feb. 20, 2018. Today's theme is "Should Our Cameras Be as Smart as Our Phones?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I've been thinking about how the camera industry could better combat the encroaching smartphone phenomenon that is eroding their marketshare. Should Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, and Fuji tap computational photography for their devices? Or would another approach make more sense? I address this issue on today's TDS podcast.

Should Our Cameras Be as Smart as Our Phones?

I was up early shooting on Sunday morning. The air was crisp and clear, and the breeze hadn't kicked up yet. So off I went with my iPhone X, Pentax KP DSLR, and Olympus PEN mirrorless.

My experience changed noticeably as I switched from camera to camera. Standing there in the middle of a vineyard, the most visually delicious visuals were looking through the optical viewfinder of the Pentax DSLR. Everything was so beautiful, and it inspired me to compose the best shots possible.

The electronic viewfinder on the PEN-F was also satisfying, but in a different way. It was like I was in a darkened theater watching the scene on a screen. And it had the advantage of presenting me with realtime exposure compensation feedback.

The iPhone was the least satisfying. Seems like composing on its amply-sized LCD should have been engaging. But I found it far less inspiring than my dedicated cameras.

Sony-Cameras-1024.jpg

This got me thinking about approaches that camera companies, and you and me, could take when encouraging aspiring artists to add a dedicated camera to their toolset. Here are my five favorites.

  • Emphasize your strengths. Create viewing experiences that can't be matched on a smartphone.
  • Continue to develop tempting lens options, and possibly create more interchangeability among brands. Look how well Olympus and Panasonic have fared by doing so.
  • Add a computational photography mode to help those making the transition from smartphones to cameras. I know there are scene detection modes now, but they pale in comparison to what we experience with mobile devices.
  • Don't try to compete on the selfie level, emphasize important life events such as travel, weddings, and art.
  • Continue to explore the design aesthetic. Smartphones are hampered by the need to fit slimly in one's pocket. But cameras have far more latitude with design, and that should be tapped.

Becoming smarter is only part of the answer. Camera manufacturers have so many assets they can leverage. They just need to focus.

Come Join me at the Skylum Photography Public Group

I'm now moderating the Skylum Photography Public Group, and I would love to have interested members from our audience join me there.

The San Francisco Street Photography Workshop Update

I've published an informative article on the San Francisco Street Photography Workshop that you may want to take a look at.

San Francisco Street Photography - April 26-28, 2018 - We'll work entirely on location in San Francisco. Our hotel in picturesque Union Square will serve as our headquarters during the event. No rental car will be necessary. We'll explore the City's hidden treasures and capture them through our lenses. As always, we're adding new shooting locations again this year, including twilight assignments. This is San Francisco like you've never seen it before. And as a bonus, Olympus Visionary Mike Boening will be joining the teaching staff and leading sessions on street shooting and night photography. Two instructors, three days, and all for just $695. (That's right, it's 3 full days in one of the most photogenic cities in the U.S.)

New! TheFilmCameraProject on Instagram

I've started a new Instagram feed just for film camera lovers. It's called TheFilmCameraProject, and it's for those who appreciate the beauty of analog SLRs.

And to celebrate the launch, I'm giving away one Pentax SLR and lens to one lucky follower of TheFilmCameraProject. All you have to do is follow the feed by Feb. 28, 2018. I'll then do a random drawing and announce the winner on the March 6 podcast. Join in the fun, and get to admire some really beautiful camera along the way.

Coming Up: Build Your Digital Darkroom with Photos

Our next Nimble Classroom is on March 10, Build Your Digital Darkroom with Photos. Here's why you might want to attend.

Updates and Such

I now have the dates for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Be sure to get on the Reserve List for this one!

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Videoblocks - Go to videoblocks.com/digitalstory to get all the stock video, audio, and images that you can imagine for just $149. Save on millions of studio-quality clips, tracks, and graphics.

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Break the electronic shackles of work and set aside some time to focus on your craft. Join us in April for the San Francisco Street Photography Workshop. It's time to get your urban on.

IMG_3231.jpg

Our headquarters is located in the heart of the city at the Cartwright Hotel. Walk out the door, and the world is ready for your camera. For three days you will live, eat, and breath urban photography with your fellow workshop participants and facilitators Derrick Story and Olympus Visionary Mike Boening. Through classroom instruction and led explorations to visually interesting corners of the city, you will capture a bounty of images.

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And if you're interested in mirrorless gear, we will have some of the coolest street photography cameras, lenses, and bags available for your to try.

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We begin with an informal reception on Wednesday, April 25 in the historic Cartwright Hotel. You'll have a chance to meet your fellow photographers and learn about the activities that lie ahead. We then get to work first thing Thursday morning, and for the next three days, urban photography is your life. We take care of the details so you can focus on your craft.

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We'll travel on foot, by streetcar, and of course cable cars as well. Every moment is a potential photograph. If this sounds like the getaway that you need to reenergize your artistic eye, then sign up today for the event. Group is limited to eight, two instructors, and an entire city just waiting for you.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

I received an image request the other morning for a photo that I captured in 2014. Those were Aperture days for me, so I went upstairs to the archive room, fired up the Drobos, and launched the appropriate Aperture library.

In 2014, I loved Aperture. I thought it was some of the finest software that Apple had designed. But on this morning, I was impatient with it. And for the first time, the interface looked a bit dated. Then I realized... the infatuation was over.

Aperture-Archive.jpg

At that moment, I decided to finally migrate that 1TB archive to Capture One Pro 11. Thanks to the easy import command (File > Import Catalog > Aperture Library), I knew that the computer would handle all of the heavy lifting. All I had to do was use another machine for a day or so. So I set up a new Capture One Catalog, and initiated the process.

Capture One Pro is exceedingly good at this transition. Most of the library structure migrates, sans Smart Albums. Many of the image adjustments carry over as well. And all of the metadata, including my star ratings and IPTC were welcomed in their new home.

A day and a half went by, and the job was complete. At first, performance was a bit funky. So I quit Capture One, counted to 10, then relaunched the app. Ah, much better. And the more I browsed, the better the performance became.

Capture-One-Pro-Archive-web.jpg

The pleasant surprise was the improved RAW processing in Capture One. All of my shots looked better. That subtle contrast enhancement that's in the Capture One secret sauce really played out nicely with my older photos. My cropping carried over as well. Yay!

I recommend that you keep separate Capture One catalogs for your archives. Mine are on Drobos with Thunderbolt connections. Performance is good enough for browsing, enhancing, and exporting older shots.

I still have my Aperture archives as well. It's just disk space, and that seems like a cheap enough insurance policy in case something goes wrong. Aperture and I had a wonderful relationship. But for now, Capture One Pro is looking after my archives.

Master Capture One Pro

Start with Capture One Pro 10 Essential Training that will quickly get you up to speed with this pro level imaging application.

Then drill down into mastering the editing tools with Capture One Pro 10: Retouching and get supremely organized with Advanced Capture One Pro: Catalog Management.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

When riding my Cannondale Bad Boy bike, I want to remove as many barriers as possible to my stopping and capturing a photo. I've learned over the years that having a camera tucked away in a backpack or on the rack reduces the number of images. To solve that problem, I configured a DIY bike holster for the front handlebars.

Bike-Holster-Front-1024.jpg

Most of us have one of these top loaders stashed in the closet. Simply shorten the strap to its minimum length and wrap it around the handlebars as shown below. Don't interfere with any of the braking or shifting cables.

Bike-Holster-top-1024.jpg

The weight of the camera does a good job of keeping the holster in the down position. But for added security, I ran 3 carabiners through the back loop. This is mainly for riding without a camera in the bag so it doesn't flop around.

Now, when I see a photo opp, it's easy to pull out the camera and shoot. If I make a stop at a retail location, I can easily take the holster with me. Most of the time, however, I just pull the camera out and leave the bag open on the handlebars. And yes, as a result of this rig, I'm shooting more on my riding errands.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #622, Feb. 13, 2018. Today's theme is "A Personal Photo Essay." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Some of the most interesting photo essays that I've seen over the years are those where the photographer is allowed inside someone's life in their home. It's fascinating to peer behind the curtain of their life, and think about how it compares to mine. But what if we told our own story, from our personal point of view? I talk about this project that anyone can do, with any camera, on this week's photography podcast.

A Personal Photo Essay

This all started one afternoon when I was writing in the main room of my studio. The winter light was streaming in from the big window facing south, and it illumined a work table where I had some of my things.

Studio-Light-1024.jpg

As I looked at the scene, I thought, this one picture says a lot about my interests. There were a pair of red headphones hanging on the chair, a B&W print on the table, a Contax film camera, pens in a fake lens cup, and a Kodak scanner that I'll be reviewing soon.

Wouldn't it be fun to do a photo essay on a day in my life here? I would take pictures of the kitchen (where I spend too much time), Dibs, Studio A, Studio B, my washer that doesn't fit quite right in the laundry room, backdrops hung over the balcony rail upstairs, and on and on.

Imagine someone finding this photo essay years later? They would learn so much about me. And even on a practical level, many of these images would be helpful for insurance claims if something bad happened here in the near future.

So here are five tips that I have to help encourage you to endeavor your own personal photo essay.

  • Look for scenes that really represent you - Your clothes hanging in the closet, your workroom, the car outside.
  • Tidy, but don't over organize. Since it's a photo essay, we do want the images to look good. But don't over organize losing the soul and personality of the scene.
  • Keep it to 36 exposures. I think 36 is a magic number here. It's a roll of 35mm film, a nice length for a slideshow, enough to tell the story, not so many that it becomes boring.
  • Write captions for the shots. Images do say a lot, but a few additional words say even more.
  • Finish the project. Build a slideshow, create a gallery that's saved as PDF, etc. Part of the beauty of this project is that it can be shared, discovered, and viewed.

New! TheFilmCameraProject on Instagram

I've started a new Instagram feed just for film camera lovers. It's called TheFilmCameraProject, and it's for those who appreciate the beauty of analog SLRs.

And to celebrate the launch, I'm giving away one Pentax SLR and lens to one lucky follower of TheFilmCameraProject. All you have to do is follow the feed by Feb. 28, 2018. I'll then do a random drawing and announce the winner on the March 6 podcast. Join in the fun, and get to admire some really beautiful camera along the way.

LRTimelapse 5 Is Here With Many Improvements and Additional Features

As reported on F-Stoppers,

LRTimelapse is without a doubt the best piece of software to manage extreme day-to-night and night-to-day transition when capturing a time-lapse sequence. This flicker remover program changed the industry for good and a new version with many improvements has just been announcement by its creator. Here is what you need to know about it.

LRTimelapse 5 is a big upgrade from version 4 but the workflow remains similar. The first thing you'll notice on LRT5 is the polished user interface. The buttons and icons look nicer and the interface is completely scalable for high-resolution monitors. Seasoned LRTimelapse users won't be lost but everything is better and faster thanks to the optimization and improved use of multithreading platforms. The program can now handle up to 32 threads.

The San Francisco Street Photography Workshop Update

Reservation forms have been sent to Reserve List members. If you signed up on the Reserve List, but didn't receive an invite, please email me.

San Francisco Street Photography - April 26-28, 2018 - We'll work entirely on location in San Francisco. Our hotel in picturesque Union Square will serve as our headquarters during the event. No rental car will be necessary. We'll explore the City's hidden treasures and capture them through our lenses. As always, we're adding new shooting locations again this year, including twilight assignments. This is San Francisco like you've never seen it before. And as a bonus, Olympus Visionary Mike Boening will be joining the teaching staff and leading sessions on street shooting and night photography. Two instructors, three days, and all for just $695. (That's right, it's 3 full days in one of the most photogenic cities in the U.S.)

Updates and Such

I now have the dates for the Sonoma Country Hot Air Balloon and Drone Photography Workshop, June 8-10, 2018. We're combining two very fun aerial activities into one workshop. Be sure to get on the Reserve List for this one!

The latest training videos posted for our Inner Circle members are processing aerial photographs in Luminar and using Lightroom for time-lapse photography.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

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Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

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