Recently in Photography

  Page 4 of 334 in Photography  

nikon-FA.jpg

The Nikon FA was introduced in 1983 and marketed as Nikon's most sophisticated techno-wonder. It was the first Nikon to incorporate multi-segmented metering. Twenty-five years later, Apple rolled out the iPhone X that utilizes computational photography with millions of lines of code executed with each tap of the shutter button. It is an incredible digital capture device.

When I work with analog, I also capture an iPhone image to use for my note taking. I thought you might be interested to see how things have evolved over the last 25 years. State of the art analog in the 1980s vs amazing 21st century tech.

Kitty Nikon FA Kitty looking out the window. Nikon FA, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, Program mode, matrix metering, Fujicolor 200 film. Un-retouched. Photo by Derrick Story.

Kitty iPhone X Kitty looking out the window, iPhone X.

I like this shot of Sylvester looking out the screen door because it is a backlit scene. (You might not realize that looking at the iPhone image. More on that later.) The Nikon FA with its new-fangled metering system actually does a wonderful job of determining the exposure in program mode. Any shortcoming in dynamic range is due to the latitude of the film.

The iPhone, on the other hand, does a great job of balancing both the main subject and the brighter background. There is more shadow detail in the dark fur, and the highlights are much more recovered.

Now the question is, which shot is more pleasing to the eye? Well, that's an individual decision, isn't it?

Neon Sign Nikon FA Neon sign. Nikon FA, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8, Program mode, matrix metering, Fujicolor 200 film. Un-retouched. Photo by Derrick Story.

Neon Sign iPhone X Neon sign. iPhone X. Un-retouched.

When I look at the neon sign image, I'm amazed by the highlight recovery in the iPhone X version. The sky in the upper left corner and the reflection on the top of the umbrellas are perfectly exposed.

The analog Nikon shot definitely displays more contrast. And to be honest, is a more accurate representation of the actual lighting. The shadows are darker and the reflections are bright. That's more how things looked at that time of day.

And that's what I've noticed with film photography... I get a better sense for the lighting because it hasn't been clipped on both ends of the histogram. Do I love the wild dynamic range of computational photography? Of course! It's such a luxury.

But along the way I don't want to lose my ability to read the scene, and to understand what's happening with the lighting. Film photography helps me stay sharp that way.

My bottom line is that I like both sets of images. And I feel lucky to have the option to choose which way to go for any given subject. And I might add, that I think the Nikon with a consumer roll of color film held up quite well. Not bad for an old man.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Is Payboo Right for You?

Payboo is both a line of credit and a creative sales tax solution offered by B&H Photo in response to a recent ruling by the Supreme Court in favor of the states wanting to collect sales tax on out of state purchases. Payboo is offered by Synchrony Bank with a revolving credit limit for any B&H purchases made online, in-store, or by phone.

payboo-graphic.png

When you complete a transaction using Payboo, you initially have to pay your home state sales tax, but it will be instantly refunded. And at the same time, both you and B&H will be complying with the law.

The Backstory

Last year, the Supreme Court ruled that out-of-state retailers must collect sales tax on Internet purchases. California and other states have recently implemented this ruling and B&H is now collecting sales tax on all applicable sales in those states. As a result, customers are now paying more for their purchases. To offset this increase, B&H came up with Payboo to mitigate the impact of sales tax for these purchases.

How it Works

Use Payboo and save the tax. When you make a purchase, you pay the tax. But with the Payboo card, you're refunded the tax amount instantly. Even though you get the money back, B&H will collect and remit state sales tax in accordance with state sales tax laws and regulations.

The Good News, but Things to Be Aware of

On the good news front, they are offering instant approval for qualified applicants. So you can use your account right away (handy for an on-the-spot big purchase). The application process is fast and easy. And, there's no annual fee.

However, if you work your way through the application, you'll see that you have 23 days to pay the balance with no interest. If you extend beyond that period, the annual percentage rate (APR) is 29.99 percent. That's steep. So if you carry a balance forward, you will quickly give back any savings you earned in the first place.

The Bottom Line

Payboo is a creative (and clever) option for those who want to offset the state sales tax on their B&H purchases. California residents, for example, would save about 8 percent.

But the numbers only work in your favor if you pay off the balance within the 23 day grace period. Any charges that you roll over to the next month will incur a 30 percent APR interest charge. So plan carefully if you choose to go the Payboo route.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #686, May 7, 2019. Today's theme is "I Say Goodbye; You Say Hello." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It has been a particularly tumultuous spring for me. So far this season I've had to bid farewell to business relationships, software favorites, and planned investments. This might feel a bit disruptive, but it also opens the door for new adventures as well. This week I share my goodbyes, plus have a terrific interview with my good friend Oliver from Boinx Software. Let's get to it!

I Say Goodbye; You Say Hello

blue-dock-1024.jpg

Here are this season's goodbyes, and a couple hellos as well.

  • Goodbye: My gig at Skylum Software - For those of you who hang out at the Skylum Facebook Public Photography Page, you might notice that I'm no longer moderating. I was recently informed via email that those operations are moving back to Ukraine.
  • Hello Frederick Van Johnson - We recently reconnected and I'm on an upcoming episode of TWiP, and will probably be on there again soon after.
  • Goodbye: Aperture Software for Real - Apple announces that Aperture will not run on macOS after Mojave. Those of you still hanging on should freeze a Mac in time so you can keep using the app.
  • Hello Portfoliobox! - Looks like our friends a Portfoliobox will be returning for another sponsor run on TDS. I'm thrilled to be working with them again.
  • Goodbye: VW Electric Bus in 2020 - I had planned on replacing my VW Vanagon in 2020 with the new all electric VW Bus for workshops, only to learn that the date has been moved back to 2022. Nuts. Looks like I'm going to have to wait a couple more years.

An Interview with Oliver Breidenbach, Boinx Software

I first met Oliver when I was program chair for the Mac Developer Conference for O'Reilly Media. His software company that he started with his brother, Boinx, makes some wonderful tools for media artists. Today, we're going to talk about mimoLive. It is amazing broadcast software for educators, businesses, and now, podcasters as well. You'll learn lots in this conversation with Oliver.

Update on the Nimble Photographer Podcast

If you're interested in learning insights from working artists who have managed to survive in this competitive environment, I would encourage you to subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast. It's available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Podcasts, Stitcher, and wherever you listen to your shows. My next interview should be live next week. In the meantime, you may want to check out to complete conversations with Trey and Ben. They're available right now.

New Online Trainings for Capture One Pro 12 and Luminar 3 with Libraries Now Available

Luminar 3 with Libraries Essential Training

Check out my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that is available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications.

Once you apply these tools to your images, you'll discover that you can enhance them in ways never before possible, especially so easily. I hope you have a chance to explore both my training and the Luminar application itself. It may change your photography.

Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training

Topics in this course include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

For those of you who like to shoot RAW+Jpegs, The Global Filters tool in Capture One Pro can be quite handy. It's available near the top of the View menu.

It allows you to quickly control what you see in the thumbnail browser. You can hide Jpegs, RAWs, processed Tiffs, PNGs, or movie files with a simple command. I like it to hide the RAWs when I only want to see and work with the Jpegs, or vice-versa.

In this short video, I walk you through the steps for using Global Filters Capture One Pro. This is from my essential training on LinkedIn Learning and lynda.com.

Use global filters to see only certain file types from Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training by Derrick Story

There's also a cautionary note: Global Filters are sticky, so if you find files missing, that's probably the reason why!

global-Filters-1024.jpg

This is just one of the many techniques that I cover in this course. Other topics include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

S1-on-white.jpg

Here's a close look at the RAW files produced by two of the most talked about cameras of 2019. First up, we have the heavy weight Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 24-105mm Lens.

The Panasonic S1 at 200 Percent

These RAW files were recorded in Program mode with auto ISO and auto white balance. The files were then loaded into Capture One Pro 12.3 running on an iMac with Retina 4K display and Radeon Pro 560 graphics card. No image edits were made to the files. The screenshots are presented the way that Capture One Pro decoded them. The loupe view in the image is at 200 percent. You can see the basic metadata for the image at the bottom of its frame.

Panasonic-S1-A3

Panasonic-S1-A4

Next up, we have two images from the Olympus OM-D E-M1X Mirrorless Digital Camera with an original version of the Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II ASPH. POWER O.I.S. Lens.

olympus-e-m1x.jpg

The Olympus OM-D E-M1X

These RAW files were recorded in Program mode with auto ISO and auto white balance. The files were then loaded into Capture One Pro 12.3 running on an iMac with Retina 4K display and Radeon Pro 560 graphics card. No image edits were made to the files. They are presented the way that Capture One Pro decoded them. The loupe view in the image is at 200 percent. You can see the basic metadata for the image at the bottom of its frame.

Olympus-E-M1X-B1

Olympus-E-M1X-B2

Notes on Comparison

This is not a scientific test. I wanted to see how the files compared after walking around taking pictures with these wonderful cameras. Images from both devices were captured in good light and lower ISOs. I would anticipate greater differences between their respective image qualities at higher ISOs.

Both cameras rendered sharp images at normal viewing and at 200 percent. It's really quite remarkable the quality we have in our cameras these days. I could tell some difference with patterns between the two competitors. The Panasonic S1 did an outstanding job of resolving linear elements displayed at various angles. The E-M1X had plenty of pop, but some of the lines weren't quite as smooth. This was only noticeable at high magnification.

The other thing that jumped out at me was the softer depth of field falloff shooting in just regular program mode with the Panasonic S1. Even at f/4, which is the maximum aperture for the 24-105mm zoom I was using, there is some lovely softness behind the subjects.

For a walk around field test, taking pictures as I would on vacation, I loved what I saw. There is an advantage to full frame, but you have to magnify (or go into low light) to appreciate the difference.

Master Capture One Pro 12

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #685, April 30, 2019. Today's theme is "Weighing in on the Full Frame Panasonic S1." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

For experienced mirrorless photographers, the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 might feel like a beast of a camera. With the standard 24-105mm zoom lens attached, it is every bit as hefty as a Canon 5D with comparable zoom. In fact, it's about 3.75 pounds. That being said, this camera packs a lot of technology in that body, and that's what I'm going to take a closer look at in today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Weighing in on the Full Frame Panasonic S1

S3-1024.jpg

For my field test, I traveled east to the picturesque town of Calistoga. I set the S1 to RAW+Jpeg, program mode, auto white balance and ISO with its 24-105mm zoom lens. I wanted to see how it performed in its default mode.

Before I share my results, however, let's take a look at the highlight specs for the $3,400 camera and lens combo.

  • 24.2MP Full-Frame MOS Sensor
  • Venus Engine Image Processor
  • 5.76m-Dot 0.78x-Magnification OLED LVF
  • 3.2" 2.1m-Dot Triaxial Tilt Touchscreen
  • UHD 4K60 Video; HDR and 10-Bit Recording
  • ISO 100-51200, Up to 9 fps Shooting
  • Contrast-Detect 225-Area DFD AF System
  • Sensor-Shift Image Stabilization
  • Weather-Sealed Construction
  • Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro O.I.S. Lens

Let's start with the sensor. It is beautiful! IMHO, the Panasonic is every bit as good as the top Sony mirrorless in terms of dynamic range, low light performance, and color rendition. When paired with the zoom lens, the images are crisp and colorful, especially the Jpegs.

The RAW files are more, well, RAW. I like the Jpeg processing of the S1 and how it renders those images. The RAWs have wild potential, but even in Capture One Pro 12, they were a bit dull at the starting point (which is OK, BTW.)

Moving into the shooting experience, it took me a while to get comfortable with the S1.

When I compare the RAW files at 400 percent to those of the Olympus E-M1X, it really depends of how much light is available. During normal outdoor shooting, there wasn't a noticeable difference between the two sets of shots, except, however, for the faster drop-off of depth of field with the S1.

However, as the ISO goes up, the differences become more apparent. I think it's safe to say that the S1 has a 2-stop advantage in low light.

So, is this camera for you? If you've been jonesing for a full frame mirrorless, you have to consider the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 a contender. Great sensor, excellent features, and top notch pictures - this camera delivers on the full frame promise.

Plus you're starting out with a reasonable L-Mount lens catalog thanks to the trio Panasonic launched with, plus 11 new optics from Sigma, plus Leica glass.

But, if you don't need full frame, I would choose a lighter more nimble camera, especially if the bulk of your shooting is in reasonable lighting. Plus, you could save yourself quite a bit of money.

Facebook, Instagram sue company that made over $9M selling fake likes and followers

This falls into the category that money can buy you love, or at least it could...

DP Review reports:Despite Instagram's Terms of Use (TOU) saying purchasing likes, followers and general activity isn't permitted, there's no shortage of services available that'll do just that. Instagram has long tried to shut these services down, but now the issue is going to be challenged in court for one particular New Zealand-based company.

Facebook has announced in a post on its Newsroom website that it and Instagram have filed a lawsuit in United States federal court against a company and three individuals located in New Zealand. According to the complaint, the defendants used various websites and corporations 'to sell fake engagement services to Instagram users.'

The lawsuit specifically seeks to stop the defendants from 'Engaging and profiting in the sale of fake likes, views and followers on Instagram,' 'Violating our Terms of Use and Community Guidelines' and 'Violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and other California laws for distributing fake likes on Instagram even after their access was revoked and their accounts were suspended.'

Update on the Nimble Photographer Podcast

A new episode will drop on Thursday. This time I'm talking with musician Alan Howarth. He's worked on scores for big time Hollywood hits such as Halloween. I think you'll be interested to hear the parallels between a musician's journey compared to that of a photographer or writer.

If you're interested in learning insights from working artists who have managed to survive in this competitive environment, I would encourage you to subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast. It's available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Podcasts, and wherever you listen to your shows. My next interview should be live next week. In the meantime, you may want to check out to complete conversations with Trey and Ben. They're available right now.

New Online Trainings for Capture One Pro 12 and Luminar 3 with Libraries Now Available

Luminar 3 with Libraries Essential Training

Check out my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that is available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications.

Once you apply these tools to your images, you'll discover that you can enhance them in ways never before possible, especially so easily. I hope you have a chance to explore both my training and the Luminar application itself. It may change your photography.

Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training

Topics in this course include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

The reasons why I've shot RAW+Jpeg over the years have changed, with the only constant being that I still do. Some people might wonder, "Why would you capture two files for the same image?" The answer is: those files are very different.

When I hear people lament the demise of Aperture 3, one of the first comments was how it so effortlessly managed RAW+Jpeg pairs. On a more modern front, of all the features that Skylum could have added to Luminar 3.1, a headliner was easy RAW+Jpeg organization. Something must be going on here.

rawplusjpeg.png Of all the features that Skylum could have highlighted in Luminar 3.1, RAW+Jpeg was a major star. Why was that?

The Difference Between RAWs and Jpegs

In basic terms, a RAW file must be processed. Typically this happens with computer software such as Lightroom, Luminar, Capture One Pro, Photos for macOS, and other image editing applications. With today's wonderful capture devices, there's a lot of photo information that you can mine from a RAW file, especially highlight and shadow recovery.

Jpegs, on the other hand, are fully baked. The camera handles the processing of the image, and it's ready to go once it's been written to memory. You can view the picture with practically any device or software from smartphones to web browsers. You can send a baby picture to Aunt Jane without worrying if she has the latest version of Lightroom. Jpegs are the epitome of versatility.

Why I Love RAW+Jpeg

But that's not why I capture Jpegs with my RAW files. We have mirrorless cameras to blame for that.

Removing the mirror and prism from these devices wasn't their only innovation. We also started to see built-in film emulation profiles, art filters, and various effects that could be applied to Jpeg files. Many of these are quite wonderful. I love the monochromes that my Olympus PEN-F captures.

And if I shoot RAW+Jpeg, I can have those lovely monochromes, and I can have super-rich RAW files, all with one click of the shutter. And for many of us, this is an important aspect of our creative workflow.

RAW files are the ultimate safety net. Yes, with Jpegs, I can go out on a wire with some crazy in-camera filter and reach for the stars. But if that experiment fails, I still have the original digital negative to work with. This makes taking risks with important shots far more reasonable.

And that, among other reasons, are why RAW+Jpegs are here to stay.

Learn Luminar with Libraries Inside and Out

Want to master Luminar 3 with Libraries in just one day? Take a look at my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that's available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications. It's fun, and you'll love the results!

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

Current Luminar photographers have a treat waiting for them with a free download of version 3.1. And if you haven't made the jump yet, you can now for only $60. ($50 if you use coupon code THEDIGITALSTORY.)

update-luminar.png

If you're a current Luminar photographer, go to Check for Updates and walk through the few basic steps to install version 3.1. The process went smoothly for me. Once you have it, here are a few of the new features to try.

New Accent AI 2.0 - The improved Accent AI filter lets you get natural-looking results in less time. New "human-aware" technology recognizes people in your photos and applies adjustments selectively for more realistic images.

RAW+Jpeg Pairs - If you capture RAW and JPEG at the same time, it's even easier to stay organized in Luminar 3. When you import RAW and JPEG pairs, you can decide which files to see. View just RAW or just JPEG for a less cluttered library, or see both and use the JPEG file as a reference while you edit. Edits to JPEG and RAW files are independent but can be easily synced. Use the View menu to control which images are shown for a clutter-free library.

Better Sorting - Are you using the Gallery view to get organized or search for that perfect image? Now when you sort using a method like File Type or Color Label, a second organization is also applied. When you sort your images they are presented by the new category first, and then automatically listed by date.

Plus, there was a lot of work under the hood to improve performance. And there are some nice touches too such as a new progress bar to keep you informed during intense operations.

Luminar 3.1 is available today for both Mac and Windows platforms.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #684, April 23, 2019. Today's theme is "How an Artist Evolves" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

On one level, evolution seems inherent in the artistic process. Creativity is both exploration and problem solving. This is all fine in theory, but what about the practical reality of being an artist in today's economy? How does work? In today's podcast I share my findings based on conversations with two creatives tackling this very topic. I hope you enjoy the show.

How an Artist Evolves

evolveing-artist.jpg

I've been working on this project that I find fascinating, and I think you might find it interesting as well. I've started a new podcast called, The Nimble Photographer where I seek out artists who have redefined success and are willing to share their stories with me.

My first conversation was with photographer Trey Ratcliff where he talked about failures vs successes. Then, I sat down with writer Ben Long, who had to reinvent his career after the crash of 2008. I have upcoming interviews scheduled with musicians, painters, and more, all touching on the topics of evolution and reinvention.

First, I want to start with this thought by Trey, who addresses the notion of success vs. failure. I think he makes some good points here.

Now, I want to jump over to Ben, who touches on the idea of doing what we love for a living, and where did that idea come from in the first place.

If you're interested in learning insights from working artists who have managed to survive in this competitive environment, I would encourage you to subscribe to The Nimble Photographer Podcast. It's available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Podcasts, Stitcher, and wherever you listen to your shows. My next interview should be live next week. In the meantime, you may want to check out to complete conversations with Trey and Ben. They're available right now.

New Online Trainings for Capture One Pro 12 and Luminar 3 with Libraries Now Available

Luminar 3 with Libraries Essential Training

Check out my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that is available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications.

Once you apply these tools to your images, you'll discover that you can enhance them in ways never before possible, especially so easily. I hope you have a chance to explore both my training and the Luminar application itself. It may change your photography.

You can download a 30-day Luminar trial here.

Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training

Topics in this course include (peppered with inside tips):

  • Tapping all the new features in Capture One Pro 12
  • Auto adjustments and basic image editing
  • Advanced editing techniques (and goodbye to Photoshop)
  • Organizing your catalog
  • Using star ratings and color labels to cull images
  • Building an electronic contact sheet
  • Creating a slideshow to review and present images
  • Strategies for protecting master images

For those of you new to this application, I have a Quick Start chapter that gets you up and running in less than 20 minutes. Yes, that's the entire workflow, start to finish, in less than half an hour.

You can learn all the ins and outs of this amazing software in the comfort of your home, or even on your smartphone by watching this fast-paced training: Capture One Pro 12 Essential Training on LinkedIn Learning. If you're a lynda.com fan, it's available there as well. You will learn everything from image organization, to expert editing, to output and more. It will feel good to finally take control of your photo library with Capture One Pro 12.

TDS Workshops Update

Humboldt Redwoods Workshop Update

Our grand finale of the season will be on Sept. 18-20 in one of the most beautiful areas on the planet. Our headquarters will be in Fortuna, CA - an easy drive from the Eureka Airport only 25 minutes away.

We're located on the Eel River, and situated perfectly to explore the Redwoods just south of us. This will be an excellent event to cool off, slow down, and get some great images. Plus, you'll be able to spend some quality time with your fellow virtual camera club members.

We still have a couple openings on the reserve list. You can secure your seat by visiting www.thenimblephotographer.com, and place a fully refundable deposit for the event.

Updates and Such

Inner Circle Members: A big thanks to those who support our podcast and our efforts!

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Your PortfolioBox site is the best way to show off your best images.

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

How the Luminar Library Works

Luminar 3 with Libraries includes a cataloging feature that helps you organize your images. This is a helpful addition to this application that already does an amazing job enhancing your pictures. But you may be wondering, "Exactly, how does the library feature work?" If you have 3 minutes, I can give you a pretty good idea.

Overview of how the Luminar catalog works from Luminar: Digital Asset Management by Derrick Story

Essentially, what you do is set up a watch folder. Every picture that you put in that folder becomes visible in the Luminar library. This is regardless if it is loose, or in another folder.

When you first set up Luminar 3 with Libraries, Skylum recommends that you point the application to your Pictures folder. I'm not as keen on that as they are. Instead, I recommend that you create a specific folder for your Luminar catalog. This gives you more control as you learn the application.

how-catalog-works.png

Take a look at the video. I walk you through the setup screens for Luminar 3 with Libraries. It is from my new training, Luminar: Digital Asset Management that is available on LinkedIn Learning and on lynda.com.

Not only do I cover the library features, I provide a Quick Start chapter to get you up to speed in minutes, I show you the Magic Editing Filters in Luminar, and I explain how to use Luminar with other applications.

Once you apply these tools to your images, you'll discover that you can enhance them in ways never before possible, especially so easily. I hope you have a chance to explore both my training and the Luminar application itself. It may change your photography.

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.