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This is The Digital Story Podcast #650, August 28, 2018. Today's theme is "The First Shoe Dropped - The Nikon Z7." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Since our last show, Nikon officially announced the Z6 and Z7 full frame mirrorless camera bodies with three new Z Mount lenses. This is the news that many Nikon users have been waiting for, not to mention thousands of other curious photographers, myself included. So how does the new camera stack up to the competition? We'll take a closer look at it in today's TDS photography podcast.

The First Shoe Dropped - The Nikon Z7

The Nikon Z7 ($3,546) and it's little brother, the Nikon Z6 ($2,146) have given us lots to think about over the last week. The bottom line for me is that they represent a bold, yet delayed move by Nikon. And as a mirrorless shooter, there are many things that I appreciate about this tandem. Let's take a closer look.

nikon-z7-front.png

  • 45.7 MP FX-Format BSI CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 6 Image Processing Engine
  • UHD 4K30 Video; N-Log & 10-Bit HDMI Out
  • 493-Point Phase-Detect AF System
  • Built-In 5-Axis Vibration Reduction
  • 0.80x 3.6m-Dot EVF with NIKKOR Optics
  • 3.2" 2.1m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • 9 fps Continuous Shooting; ISO 64-25600
  • Top-Panel Dot-Matrix OLED; XQD Card Slot
  • FTZ Mount Adapter in the kit for $3,546

What I Like

At the top of the list is the built-in to the body is a 5-axis sensor-shift Vibration Reduction mechanism for up to 5 stops of stabilization regardless of the lens used. This system also works with adapted lenses when using the optional FTZ Adapter where 3-axis stabilization is used.

I'm also a big fan of the EN-EL15b rechargeable lithium-ion battery providing approximately 330 shots per charge with in-camera charging is supported. This camera is also compatible with EN-EL15 and EN-EL15a batteries, however do not support in-camera charging.

I'm impressed with the 3.6m-dot electronic finder for comfortable eye-level viewing. It has a high 0.80x magnification and uses NIKKOR optics to guarantee a sharp, clear image. The finder also has a Fluorine coating for easier cleaning. I'm also liking the 3.2" 2.1m-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD.

And finally, the overall Nikon quality factor for ruggedness and weather resistance makes this a camera that you can work with in the most demanding situations. The robust magnesium-alloy chassis is both dust- and weather-resistant to benefit working in harsh climates and inclement conditions.

What I Don't Like

The single XQD memory card slot that is compatible with CFexpress, enabling support for future media. I think there should be two slots, with the second one being SD. Just as the FTZ mount adapter helps photographers migrate to the new Z Mount system, an SD slot would allow the same thing for removable memory.

The overall size and weight with lenses mounted is substantial, and not that great savings over many DSLRs. Without lens, the dimensions are 5.3 x 4.0 x 2.7" / 134.0 x 100.5 x 67.5 mm with a weight of 1.29 lb / 585 g. Add the smallest lens available, the Nikon Z Mount 35mm f/1.8 ($846), and you add another 3.4" and 13 ounces. That's a lot of camera.

And finally, it is an expensive camera, costs $200 more than the Sony a7R III and $100 more than the Nikon D850. Its battery life is half of what Sony offers, and it is a larger camera as well.

Bottom Line

I'm thrilled that Nikon finally has a serious entry into the mirrorless space. Both the Z7 and the Z6 look like top shelf cameras that should appeal to existing Nikon DSLR photographers. I could see the Z6 making a excellent second camera for D850 photographers.

But I don't see Sony shooters jumping ship over these cameras, and I doubt many Olympus, Panasonic, or Fujifilm photographers will either unless they have a compelling need for full frame. And even then, it's going to be hard to choose the Nikon over the Sony offerings.

Panasonic Unveils the Lumix LX100 II with a 17MP Sensor and Touchscreen

Via Petapixel - Panasonic has announced the new Panasonic Lumix LX100 II, a new high-end compact camera (the seventh in the LX series) that succeeds the 12.8MP LX100 with a 17-megapixel Four Thirds sensor.

On the front of the camera is a LEICA DC VARIO-SUMMILUX 24-75mm (35mm equiv.) f/1.7-2.8 lens. Coupled with the relatively large sensor (for a compact camera), the camera is able to achieve shallow depth of field and beautiful bokeh. Photographers can directly control the aperture with the ring on the lens, which is suitable for things ranging from portraits to landscapes to macro (the minimum focusing distance is just 3cm/1.2in).

The built-in Live View Finder (LVF) has a 2.76-million-dot resolution, a roughly 100% color reproduction, a 16:9 Wide Screen aspect ratio, a 1.39x/0.7x (35mm equiv.) magnification, and a 100% field of view. Eye Sensor AF makes the camera start focusing as soon as you start looking into the LVF.

This looks like a solid upgrade. I'm disappointed, however, that there isn't a tilting LCD as part of the improvements.

Free Webinar! Building a Powerful Digital Darkroom in Apple Photos

My publisher, Rocky Nook, is sponsoring a free webinar so that I can show you how to leverage the amazing editing extensions created by companies such as Skylum, DxO, and others to build your own custom digital darkroom right inside Photos for macOS.

It's an impressive workflow, really. Your iPhone images are automatically added to the app via iCloud, and it's so easy to include images from your mirrorless and DSLR cameras as well. You can process RAWs or Jpegs, it makes no difference. And once you perfect the image using extensions such as Luminar, DxO OpticsPro, RAW Power and others, the changes are automatically saved to your other devices and computers.

It's powerful and easy. But the part that I really like is that it's fun. Join me on Wednesday, August 29 at 11am PDT to see for yourself. You can Register Here. See you then!

Updates and Such

A big thanks to Marshall Lew, Bill Armon, Bob McCarney, and Ed Spenser for contacting me about film camera donations. I've already received some of the gear, and I'm working on those pieces to prepare for the store.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #649, August 21, 2018. Today's theme is "Inside Skylum - A Visit with Scott Bourne." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Skylum Software, creators of Luminar and Aurora HDR, has established its U.S. headquarters in Bellevue, WA. I stopped by on my way to New York for a visit with Scott Bourne, Alex Tsepko, and the rest of the Skylum team who were there for the grand opening of the new office. And I thought you might also enjoy a peek behind the curtain. That's the top story on today's TDS photography podcast.

Inside Skylum - A Visit with Scott Bourne

I've been a big fan of Luminar since day one. So much so, that I wanted to be a part of the Skylum team as they continue to evolve it and their other products.

Among my responsibilites, I'm the moderator for the Skylum Photography Public Group on Facebook, the redesign project for their marketplace, and developing new outreach initiatives for them.

To share with you some of the things that I've learned during my time of working with Skylum, I sat down with Scott Bourne, President, to talk about where we've come and where we're headed.

IMG_2896.jpg Bellevue, Washington. Photos by Derrick Story.

P8161078.jpg Skylum U.S. HQ Photo Studio.

P8161068.jpg Team work area with break room in the background.

P8161083.jpg Scott Bourne, President (center), Alex Tsepko, CEO (right), and Scott M. Smedresman, lawyer (left).

Lexar Memory Cards are Coming Back from the Dead

Via Petapixel - "Back in June 2017, Micron announced that it would be discontinuing its entire Lexar removable storage business that included memory cards, readers, flash drives, storage drives, and more. A few months later, the Chinese company Longsys swooped in and acquired the brand. Longsys now says that Lexar will be returning from the grave.

Now a Longsys-owned business, Lexar announced this week that it's resuming full production of its products and will begin shipping to major retailers again this fall.

The product lineup will include memory cards, card readers, solid state drives (SSDs), and USB flash drives geared toward professional photographers and other creators.

You may recall a reference to this possibility back in June when I interviewed Wes Brewer, ProGrade CEO for the Fascinating ProGrade Digital Story.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #648, August 14, 2018. Today's theme is "Is the Panasonic TS7 as Smart as it is Tough?." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

When I first laid eyes on the Panasonic TS7 digital camera, I knew I had to get my hands on it. And once I did, it felt every bit as good as I imagined. But once you get past its rugged good looks, how does it perform? Does it have the brains to match the body? This is the question that I'll address in today's TDS Photography Podcast.

Is the Panasonic TS7 as Smart as it is Tough?

The Panasonic Lumix DC-TS7 is no lightweight, that's for sure. It feels like a crush-proof camera that can be submerged 100' below the surface of the ocean. And it packs some pretty powerful specs as well. But in the field, does it live up to its promise?

Lumix-TS7-1024.jpg

Here are some of the features of the Panasonic TS7 that got me excited:

  • 20.4MP High-Sensitivity MOS Sensor
  • 4.6x Zoom Lens, 28-128mm (35mm Equiv.)
  • UHD 4K 30p and 24p Video Recording
  • 1.17m-Dot Electronic Live View Finder
  • 3.0" 1.04m-Dot LCD Monitor
  • 4K Photo Modes and Post Focus

Now, let's talk about how those features actually worked. And if you're an Inner Circle Member via Patreon, I have a fun video waiting for you that shows you more of what I've discussed here. Jump over there and take a look.

Photographer Typecasting

I was reading a Steve Huff article titled, Amazon 1dX II Scam Update where he was following up to an earlier article about being scammed via Amazon for a Canon 1DX order. But a funny thing happened along the way that caught my ear.

How the Original Canon 5D Stacks Up Against the 5D Mark IV

Via Petapixel, they write:

Photographer Pablo Strong recently did a shootout to see how the original Canon 5D from 2005 stacks up against the latest Canon 5D Mark IV from 2016. The 7.5-minute video above is a report of his findings.

The Canon 5D, which Strong calls "arguably the best deal in photography" when paired with the 50mm f/1.8 II lens, was a camera that helped full frame cameras break into the mainstream. It was the first full-frame DSLR in a smaller, standard camera body and its price tag of $3,300 also set a new standard for how affordable full-frame cameras could be.

The camera is 13-years-old now and can be purchased used for about $350 these days. Pair it with the 50mm f/1.8 II (which costs about $75 used) and you have yourself a full-frame DSLR kit for around $400.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #647, August 7, 2018. Today's theme is "Digitizing, Printing, and More!." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I guess you could say that I'm a 2-way photographer. In one direction, I'm keenly interested in making prints from my digital images. Going the other way, I'm fascinated by methods for digitizing my analog shots. And in today's TDS podcast, I talk with Peter Krogh, author of "Digitizing Your Photos". Plus I share my first experiences with the Canon Pro-100 and Red River's Polar Luster Metallic paper. What a show!

Interview with Peter Krogh

Peter's book, Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom is a cornucopia of helpful information for developing an efficient and high quality workflow for scanning analog content.

I sit down and talk with Peter during the first segment of today's show.

Use this link for a 10 percent discount. I also have a coupon code that you can use at checkout as well: AFFstory

Setting Up and Testing the Canon Pro-100 Printer

Now that I have my rebate, it's time to start printing with the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Wireless Professional Inkjet Photo Printer . It's still on sale until the end of August with a $250 rebate, resulting in a final price of $119.99.

After my first day of printing with it, here are my pros and cons.

The Amazing Red River Polar Luster Metallic 255 Inkjet Printing Paper

Prints-1024.jpg

I've never used inkjet stock like the Red River Polar Luster Metallic 255. The luster surface with the metallic base create a compelling look that is magical under direct lighting.

In fact, I'm adding a new light set up to my studio just for these prints. More on this during this segment of the show.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #646, July 31, 2018. Today's theme is "Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A subcompact camera with a 1" sensor is a luxury indeed. And for that reason alone, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI Digital Camera is worth a look. But then add a relatively fast Zeiss Vario-Sonnar 24-200mm zoom, popup electronic viewfinder, and 4K video recording, and you have to ask yourself, "What the heck is going on here?" We're going to answer that question in today's TDS photography podcast.

Sony RX100 VI: You Can Have it All

There is a lot to like about this camera... so much so, that it would probably take me two more articles to cover all of the stuff that I didn't get to here. And if you're looking for an ultra-compact all-in-one capture device, it's going to be hard to find a more capable machine.

P7256358-gear-RX100.jpg

That being said, the one thing that was missing for me was the physical experience of holding a more substantial camera. In other words, I missed the feeling of taking pictures with a camera that feels great in the hands.

This is not a knock on the RX100 VI. It was designed to serve as a marvelous compact for those who need a small form factor. And as such, Sony knocked it out of the park. And if that's what you need for business travel or vacation, I can easily recommend this camera...

... except for the one thing that I haven't talked about yet: its cost is $1,200. On one hand, it's totally worth the steep price tag. Combine the features, image sensor, and exceptional zoom lens, and you have a deluxe package that should command a premium price. But the fact of the matter is, $1,200 is a lot of money for a compact camera. And if you invest that amount of money, you'd better get your shots out of it, and that means using it more often than just during travel.


Read the full review! "The Sony RX100 VI - A Compact Beast" - The RX100 VI is a pricy, no-holds-barred compact camera. Does its extensive feature set and fantastic image quality justify the price? Here's my take - http://thedigitalstory.com/2018/07/Sony-RX100VI-review.html.


So, then, what is the answer to the question: Is it worth it? I can say, "Yes it is." But, is the Sony RX100 VI for you? Well, that depends on your credit card balance, disposable income, and yes, the most important person in your life who might see you using it and ask: "Oh, that's a cute camera. How much did it cost?"

Nauticam Releases Underwater Housing for Sony RX100 VI

F-Stoppers reports: "While the pocket-sized camera is clearly ideal for travel, the NA-RX100 VI housing is just as practical. Weighing 2.3 pounds (1.05 kilograms), you'll be happy to hear the system will take up very little space and weight in your carry-on or checked baggage.

If you like deep dives, the underwater housing can be taken to a depth of 380 feet (100 meters). It's a nice selling point, but how many divers go to such depths? The housing ships with a standard interchangeable port, which was not found on earlier versions of the Sony RX100 underwater housing line. The standard port allows use of the full zoom range -- up to 200mm -- and can be equipped with the M67 Flip Diopter Holder, which allows photographers to add the SMC-1 Super Macro Converter for shooting the tiniest ocean critters.

The new NA-RX100 VI is priced at $1,100 and is available to order now through the Nauticam website.

No Longer Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. And I'm happy to report that I now have my rebate. Here's the final chapter.

Nikon counts down to new mirrorless

DP Review reports: "Following an earlier leak, Nikon has officially started the clock on a countdown to its upcoming 'special event', widely assumed to be the launch of a new mirrorless system. The timer is counting down to 1pm, on the 23rd of August (Tokyo time). That's midnight in New York, 5am in London and 9pm on the previous day for the DPReview office here in Seattle."

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #645, July 24, 2018. Today's theme is "FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

It makes total sense that the mirrorless revolution began without Canon and Nikon. On one level, that's what made it a revolution. FOPS - Fujifulm, Olympus, Panasonic, and later, Sony - previous underdogs, blazed the trail that many of us journey on today. But it was only a matter of time until the lords of the manor realized that they too must travel this road. And after a few notable detours, Canon and Nikon appear to be catching up. And when they do, the mirrorless revolution will enter phase two. But for reasons different than you might think. And that's our topic on today's TDS Photography Podcast.

FOPS and the New Mirrorless Revolution

2018 is a Photokina year, and the perfect stage for both Canon and Nikon to show off their full frame mirrorless cameras. Nikon has already begun to tease their release. And I'm sure that Canon isn't far behind.

So what does this mean for mirrorless photography? For enthusiasts, I don't think much. Many Canon and Nikon ex-patriots have already found new homes. And I doubt most of them would ever go back. Pros who had previously dismissed mirrorless bodies, however, should be keenly interested in these new offerings.

But don't expect Canon and Nikon to release anything truly innovative. That's not their gift to the community. Their machines will be powerful, robust, and feature excellent image quality. Something a pro can depend on.

mirrorless-v2.jpg

The real change will be led by FOPS (Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, and Sony) and their response to the increased competition introduced by Canon and Nikon (Cankon). What might those changes look like? Here are 5 theories.

  • More Artificial Intelligence - This actually fights the battle on two fronts: smartphones and Cankon.
  • Seamless Smartphone Communication - We evolve from sending our images to our smartphones to just having them there.
  • Lower Price Points - FOPS already has a bigger mirrorless community base, so they should be able to leverage those numbers to offer more affordable hardware.
  • More Creative Modes - When you look at applications such as Luminar featuring alluring filters such as Image Radiance and Orton Effect, imagine if those filters were built into your camera?
  • Innovative Body Design - Mirrorless brought back the retro look. But they have other design opportunities as well, especially MFT bodies that can use smaller form factors.

Canon and Nikon re-entering the mirrorless space with quality products does not signal phase two of the mirrorless revolution in of itself. What they have already done with their saber rattling is to reenergize FOPS to take more risks and push their innovation envelope even further. And those four companies will lead the second wave of mirrorless.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 23, and still no rebate in sight. Here's what did happen this week.

I was urged by some listeners to visit the rebate site and check my status. I couldn't figure how to do that exactly, so I initiated a chat with one of their staff members. I was instructed to send an email to canonrebates@acbcoop.com - I did so only July 18. On July 20, I received the following response from them:

"Good Afternoon, You claim was received and approved. Please allow 1-2 weeks for card to mail." I'll keep you posted.

Testing the Sony RX100 VI

I had a nice surprise last week when the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI ($1,200) showed up at my door. It's a beautiful little camera with a 1" sensor and a 24-200mm zoom lens with a max aperture of f/2.8.

I'm shooting with it now, and I'm hoping to have a report as early as next week. Stay tuned.

Thanks for the Podcast Reviews

I recently asked folks to post a review on iTunes if they were so inclined to freshen up our list. Big thanks to Murlach, flatmacsurf, JohnF from CT, Fastidious 1, and Brook Craven for chiming in. Each wrote informative comments that will be truly useful to potential listeners. Awesome!

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #644, July 17, 2018. Today's theme is "The Filter Box" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

I'm not one to hang on to unused items. If a camera or lens isn't seeing action, then I move it along to someone who will put it to use. I do have one exception to this rule: filters. I store them in a large shoebox at my studio. And they are the one photography accessory that I seldom part with. Why is that? I answer that question on today's TDS photography podcast.

The Filter Box

I remember when I bought my first brand new polarizer. It was a 55mm Contax circular model. It cost some godly amount of money, even for day that was decades ago. I was fine spending $300 for lens. But then to turn around and add another $100 for a filter? That seemed crazy.

It was then, all those years ago, that I decided to protect and save my investment in filters. I knew that if I stuck to this approach, that it would save me thousands of dollars over my career.

IMG_2689.jpg

My photography is still going strong. And my filter investment is looking smarter than ever. Here are five reasons why.

  • Filters are brand independent - Over the years, I've jumped from Contax, to Canon, to Pentax, Olympus, Samsung, Panasonic, and others. The lenses are tied to the camera brand. But the filters are not. I can use a Canon filter on a Pentax lens no problem. And I do it all the time.
  • Filters cost a lot - Think about it: most filters are a cookie-cutter circle of optical glass, that's coated and usually mounted in a brass ring. Relative to the complexity of a camera lens, their price is way too high.
  • Filters last a long time - I have filters that date back to the 1960s that still perform well. I've read that they lose their effectiveness over time. To some degree, maybe. But not so much that they compromise my work. The thing about filters is that there is not focusing mechanism, aperture blades, or f-stop ring to break. So unless you strip their threads, they function.
  • Creative filters help shake up your photography - Whether it is a Zeiss Softar, Tiffen cinematic effects, or a rotating graduated filter - when I retrieve one from the box and pack it in my bag, fun just seems to follow.
  • Filters provide a sense of security - I'm always a little over protective when I get a new lens. The first thing that I do is put a good filter on it before I hit the road. And I always feel more secure after doing so.

Bickering over whether or not to use filters has been going on as long as photography itself. One thing that I do know is that quality, multicoated, filters have virtually no adverse impact on my images, and often provide some enhancement. Just like with lenses, get quality glass, and your investment will be rewarded.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 16, and still no rebate in sight. I will keep you posted....

My Incredible Scouting Trip to Lassen Volcanic National Park

I'm back from my scouting trip for Burney Falls and Lassen Volcanic National Park workshop and I had an amazing time. Here's the recap.

We have one seat open. This is the last opportunity to reserve before I go public next week. You're not going to want to miss this!

Review Copies Available for the Apple Photos Book for Photographers

I have 5 signed copies of the Apple Photos Book for Photographers, 2nd Edition, available. If you can post a review by August 15th, then send me your shipping info via the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. I'll get that book out to you right away. First come, first served.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Bill Armon, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #643, July 10, 2018. Today's theme is "Has Flickr Found Its Soulmate?" I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Flickr was my first serious photo sharing site. I joined in 2006. But even though it hosts billions of images posted by millions of users, it has been written off for dead for years. The problem is, someone forgot to tell the photographers who use it, including its new owner, Smugmug. People endure bad relationships all the time. And some lucky ones escape them to find their soulmates. I think Flickr's story is far from over. And we're going to take a closer look at this journey on today's TDS podcast.

Has Flickr Found Its Soulmate?

Since May 2007, when Flickr started compiling my stats, I've had 3,125,472 views for my 9,515 photos. Our Digital Story Public Group has 3,243 members who have posted 76,903 images since its inception in October 2006. My latest Explore image, "Black Pool," has had nearly 50,000 views and 154 Faves in less than a week. If this is the photography ghost town that many claim it to be, then hand me a lens cloth to dust off my zoom, because I'm sticking around. (My site, BTW, is Derrick Story on Flickr.)

flickr-smugmug.jpg

Before I go down this path any further, let's take a brief look back at Flickr's history. It was founded in 2004 by Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake. In March of 2005, Yahoo! bought Flickr for about $24 million and moved the servers from Canada to the U.S. Over the next decade, a hodgepodge of feature additions, plus a major site redesign in 2013, delighted many users and frustrated others.

Then for some odd reason, Verizon bought Yahoo! and Flickr in June of 2017. The Flickr side of that purchase didn't last long, with SmugMug taking it over in April 2018. And that's where we stand now.

For those of you not familiar with SmugMug, "it is a photography platform dedicated to visual storytellers. SmugMug has a long history of empowering people who love photography and who want to improve their craft, making them a perfect fit for Flickr and our creative community. With SmugMug, photographers can create beautiful portfolios, use a powerful e-commerce platform to sell their photos, preserve their memories, and stand out with great options for showcasing their work."

And I think this will be the marriage that sticks. Here are five reasons why. (Much of this information is from the SmugMug/Flickr FAQ.)

  • Why Did SmugMug Buy Flickr? - An opportunity to join together two communities and businesses that share the same values was one we couldn't pass up.
  • Why Is SmugMug the Right Partner? - Here at SmugMug we love and live photography, which makes us the perfect partners with the team at Flickr. Our communities complement each other and have for years. Together our brands give photographers a place online to fit in and a place to stand out.
  • What Immediate Changes Should Flickr Users Expect? - We don't have any plans for immediate changes. If we make any changes, we're going to make sure the changes are for the better. We'll make sure to involve our loyal customers in the process as we grow both SmugMug and Flickr. Have no worries, Flickr will stay Flickr and SmugMug will stay SmugMug, but together both will get even better.
  • SmugMug Will Listen to the Flickr Community - Honestly, though, there are numerous parts of Flickr that we plan to improve and SmugMug supports our desire to make your Flickr experience better. Before making any significant changes to the Flickr experience, SmugMug is committed to spending time getting to know the community and listening to your needs. We will share updates as we map out our future together.
  • Both Companies are Photo-Centric - I've been a SmugMug customer for years, and I can tell you that they know and love photography. Their services are complementary to Flickr's. There's no guarantee of success, but I really like the odds.

When SmugMug acquired Flickr earlier this year, Gizmodo publish a post titled, Flickr Takes Another Sad Turn, Gets Bought by Something Called SmugMug. The author concluded that, "If nothing else, SmugMug now finds itself in possession of a cherished relic from the early days of Web 2.0 and a shit-ton of photos that can be printed on tote bags or whatever. Good for it."

I looked up the author, AJ Dellinger, on Instagram. He has 73 followers.

I think it's time that we put Flickr's fate in the hands of people who care about photography. That's you and me, and as far as I can tell, SmugMug as well. If you haven't used Flickr for a while, stop by. Post an image. See what others are doing.

For me, Flickr is a source of inspiration, a community of peers, and provides access to images that thanks to Creative Commons licensing, I can use for many of my projects.

And then to bring it even closer to home, join our The Digital Story Digital Photography Public Group. Those are our people. And they are sharing images every day. And it's their work that I draw from for out TDS Member Photo of the Day on Facebook.

Still Waiting for my Canon Rebate

On the June 11, 2018 TDS Podcast I mentioned that "I'm Taking the Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Rebate Challenge" and had mailed in all the required documents for my $250 rebate. I just checked the mail today, July 9, and still no rebate in sight. I will keep you posted....

Scouting Trip for the TDS Fall Photography Workshop

I'm heading out on a scouting mission for our BURNEY FALLS AND LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK WORKSHOP this coming September 27. Those of you who have signed up for the event are in for a real treat.

We've upgraded our accommodations to a wonderful, spacious home at Lake Almanor, complete with Internet and cell coverage. The room and board fees will be dropping from the stated $65 a night amount, and we're including even more meals. This is looking really good.

I'll have an update on shooting locations once I return from the scouting mission. But we've already explored some great sites, and there are still more on the list.

We have two seats open. This is the last opportunity to reserve before I go public next week. You're not going to want to miss this!

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Paul Brown, Jane Beckman, Sally Harms,Kathleen McKee, Wendell Smith, Ken Wolter, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Luminar Deep Dive Workshop

July 21, 2018 - 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM - Santa Rosa, CA Facilitators: Derrick Story and Angela Andrieux

Practically every photographer who comes to Luminar arrived from somewhere else.

Maybe you're a Lightroom user who wants to get away from the Creative Cloud subscription. Many Aperture users have been waiting for the next big thing that they can migrate to. Regardless of where you're coming from, Luminar offers both the traditional editing tools that we've come to love, plus innovation that we've never seen before... all in one affordable package.

If you're interested in the future of image editing, this workshop is for you. Derrick and Angela will show you how to apply your favorite techniques in Luminar, such as using a gradient screen to tame an overly bright sky, plus introduce you to the next generation of image editing with tools such as Accent-AI.

The four-hour workshop will be divided into 3 segments.

Session 1 - Luminar Basics: How to Accomplish Everyday Tasks

Session 2 - Traditional Techniques in Luminar: Working with Layers, Screens, Blending Modes and More

Session 3 - The New Age of Image Editing: How Luminar's New Tools will Change Your Photography

Plus, we'll provide the latest information about the Skylum Digital Asset Manager, lead Q&A sessions, and share our experiences working with the Skylum team.

If you want to explore the Luminar alternative, then this is an event you don't want to miss.

About the Facilitators

Angela a photographer, blogger, and photography coach living in Chesapeake, VA. She is a working photographer, educator, and works with Skylum, helping to facilitate their community forum. Angela provides both creative and technical support. And she truly understands the Luminar image editing process.

Derrick is a writer, photographer, teacher, and podcaster. You can follow his weekly shows on TheDigitalStory.com, as well as read his blog posts, check out his workshop schedule, and find links to his social accounts, including Instagram (DerrickStory), Twitter (Derrick_Story), and Facebook (thedigitalstory). TheDigitalStory show is also available where ever you download your podcasts. Derrick is the moderator for Skylum's Public Group on Facebook.

Workshop Fee: $69

You can register here at: our workshops page.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #642, July 3, 2018. Today's theme is "Shake it Up." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

Zeiss-OMD-1024.jpg Analog Zeiss 85mm f/1.4 mounted on an Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, Softar 1 Filter, and lens adapter.

There are days when I go to my photo cave and just start spreading things around - lenses, filters, gels, reflectors, diffusers, and whatever else I have laying around. Then I start looking for interesting combinations. I want to do something different. I want to shake it up. And that's the topic of today's TDS photo podcast.

Shake it Up

One of my favorite things about mirrorless photography is that we have so many options when it comes to lenses. Adapters are cheaper than ever, so you can have three or four in different mounts. This opens up a whole world of new optics for your camera. And don't forget filters and other modifiers as well.

Let's look at some of the ways's I've shook it up recently.

  • Old Lens, New Camera - I just shot a series of images with a Contax Zeiss 85mm f/1.4 mounted to my OM-D E-M1 Mark II.
  • Profile Cat in Hallway Dibs the Cat captured with the Zeiss 85mm and Softer 1 filter. Photo by Derrick Story.

  • Real Filters - I just scored a Zeiss Softar 1 filter. It has a look that's different than what I'm doing in post. How about the guy who went street shooting with an ND filter?
  • Wet it Down - Water is the original saturation slider.
  • Pinhole Adapters - Yes, they make them for mirrorless cameras, and they are a blast.
  • Infrared - When summer rolls around, I think thinking about IR photography. Why? Because it's actually better in the middle of the day. I use a Hoya R72 Infrared Filter.

Try at least one of these this month, then let me know how it goes. I'm guessing that you will come away with an image that you like, and possibly never dreamed that you could create.

Court Rules Copying Photos Found on Internet is Fair Use

Article via Petapixel.

A Virginia federal court has made a decision that photographers won't be happy to hear: the court ruled that finding a photo on the Internet and then using it without permission on a commercial website can be considered fair use [under the right conditions].

In the United States, whether or not a use of copyrighted material without permission can be considered fair use (17 U.S. Code § 107) depends on four main factors: (1) the purpose and character of the use (including whether it's "transformative" and commercial vs. non-commercial), (2) the nature of the copyrighted work, (3) how much of the work is used, and (4) how much the use affects the market and/or value of the work. After considering these four factors, District Judge Claude M. Hilton of the Eastern District of Virginia concluded that the festival's use of Brammer's photo fit the criteria for fair use.

I'm sure we're going to hear more about this case.

Do You Have a Film Camera that Needs a Good Home?

Over the last year, I've received donations from TDS members who have film cameras that need a good home. What I do is inspect the items, repair and clean as I can, then list them in TheFilmCameraShop where I can find a good home for them. If you're interested in donating, please use the Contact Form on TheNimblePhotographer site. And thanks for you consideration!

Thanks to Paul Brown, Jane Beckman, Sally Harms, Kathleen McKee, Wendell Smith, Ken Wolter, and others who have previously contributed their gear to TheFilmCamerasShop.

Luminar Deep Dive Workshop

July 21, 2018 - 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM - Santa Rosa, CA Facilitators: Derrick Story and Angela Andrieux

Practically every photographer who comes to Luminar arrived from somewhere else.

Maybe you're a Lightroom user who wants to get away from the Creative Cloud subscription. Many Aperture users have been waiting for the next big thing that they can migrate to. Regardless of where you're coming from, Luminar offers both the traditional editing tools that we've come to love, plus innovation that we've never seen before... all in one affordable package.

If you're interested in the future of image editing, this workshop is for you. Derrick and Angela will show you how to apply your favorite techniques in Luminar, such as using a gradient screen to tame an overly bright sky, plus introduce you to the next generation of image editing with tools such as Accent-AI.

The four-hour workshop will be divided into 3 segments.

Session 1 - Luminar Basics: How to Accomplish Everyday Tasks

Session 2 - Traditional Techniques in Luminar: Working with Layers, Screens, Blending Modes and More

Session 3 - The New Age of Image Editing: How Luminar's New Tools will Change Your Photography

Plus, we'll provide the latest information about the Skylum Digital Asset Manager, lead Q&A sessions, and share our experiences working with the Skylum team.

If you want to explore the Luminar alternative, then this is an event you don't want to miss.

About the Facilitators

Angela a photographer, blogger, and photography coach living in Chesapeake, VA. She is a working photographer, educator, and works with Skylum, helping to facilitate their community forum. Angela provides both creative and technical support. And she truly understands the Luminar image editing process.

Derrick is a writer, photographer, teacher, and podcaster. You can follow his weekly shows on TheDigitalStory.com, as well as read his blog posts, check out his workshop schedule, and find links to his social accounts, including Instagram (DerrickStory), Twitter (Derrick_Story), and Facebook (thedigitalstory). TheDigitalStory show is also available where ever you download your podcasts. Derrick is the moderator for Skylum's Public Group on Facebook.

Workshop Fee: $69

You can register here at: our workshops page.

Updates and Such

I've updated our Directory to Portfolios by TDS Photographers page. Stop by and see what your peers are publishing.

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.

This is The Digital Story Podcast #641, June 26, 2018. Today's theme is "Overcooked." I'm Derrick Story.

Opening Monologue

A by-product of today's amazing post production software is sometimes images that are over-saturated, sharpened, and in general, overdone. You may think that the creators of these images would see their overzealous processing. But realizing it is trickier than you'd think. We're going to take a closer look at this phenomenon in today's TDS podcast.

Overcooked

I remember standing before a series of images printed by Ansel Adams. The photo was the famous Moonrise Over Hernandez. There were about a dozen prints on the wall, and as I examined them from left to right, each image became darker and more intense.

The image on the far left was an early print. The one on the far right was one of the last prints. It was amazing to me to stand back and watch how the artist keep pushing the envelope as he printed the image over the years. My favorite version was one of the earlier prints.

I thought about Adams again recently when reviewing images by very good photographers online. Nearly all of them were great captures. Some of them had complementary post processing that enhanced the original image. Many of them had gone too far in editing and had created striking but unnatural works. I wondered that if the same phenomenon that led to Adams overcooking Moonrise Over Hernandez applies to editing with software. My conclusion is they are very much the same.

overcooked.jpg

Here are five suggestions to help you check your processing to prevent overcooking your images.

  • Determine the Objective of the Image - Is this shot meant to be surrealistic or abstract? If not, what is your goal with it? Have some idea before your start editing.
  • Study the Works of Photographers You Admire - One of the best ways to refine your visual voice to study the works of those you admire. When do they push the envelope, and when do they show restraint?
  • Stop Editing and Walk Away - This is a critical step, especially when working late at night. Let your eyes reset by focusing on other things, such as the outdoors during a breath of fresh air.
  • Show Others Your Work - Most of us realize that we are sometimes not the best judge of our work. Show different versions of the image to someone you trust artistically. Listen to their comments with an open mind.
  • Learn Your Visual Weaknesses - Do you tend to over sharpen or use too much clarity? Do you have a track record of opening up shadows too much and killing the highlights? Are your a saturation fiend that think if a little color is good, then lots is even better?

It's hard to show restraint sometimes. We've all been there. But keeping this guidelines in mind will help you develop a more consistent, appealing visual voice.

The Portfolio Project - Week 8 - The Directory is Live!

You can now visit our Directory of Portfolios by TDS Photographers. I will continue to add sites to this page on a weekly basis.

If you've signed up for a Portfoliobox Pro account, and have published at least one page, then send me the link to that site. Use the Contact Form on the Nimble Photographer and provide your name, the link, and the subject of the page or site you've published.

I will also maintain the link to the directory in our show notes, and I will add it to the Member Participation page on TheDigitalStory.

I love using Portfoliobox for these reasons:

  • My images look great, both on my computer and on my mobile devices.
  • It's easy to use. Without any instruction, I'm adding a high quality page in just minutes.
  • It's affordable. There's a free plan and a Pro version. The Pro version is only $82.80 per year or $8.90 per month USD, and that's before the 20 percent TDS discount.

Highlights with the Pro Plan

In addition to unlimited pages, you get a personalized domain name, web hosting, and up to 1,000 images.

Get Started Today

Just go to the TDS Landing Page to get started with your free account, or to receive the 20 percent discount on the Pro version. And if you want to see the page that I've begun, visit www.derrickstoryphotography.com.

Hands on with the Ruggard Electronic Dry Cabinet

I published a hands-on review of the Ruggard Electronic Dry Cabinet. This is a handsome and useful storage unit for photography gear and prints. It's available at B&H for $249 with free shipping. And it might be something that would look great in your office or studio.

Luminar Deep Dive Workshop

July 21, 2018 - 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM - Santa Rosa, CA Facilitators: Derrick Story and Angela Andrieux

Practically every photographer who comes to Luminar arrived from somewhere else.

Maybe you're a Lightroom user who wants to get away from the Creative Cloud subscription. Many Aperture users have been waiting for the next big thing that they can migrate to. Regardless of where you're coming from, Luminar offers both the traditional editing tools that we've come to love, plus innovation that we've never seen before... all in one affordable package.

If you're interested in the future of image editing, this workshop is for you. Derrick and Angela will show you how to apply your favorite techniques in Luminar, such as using a gradient screen to tame an overly bright sky, plus introduce you to the next generation of image editing with tools such as Accent-AI.

The four-hour workshop will be divided into 3 segments.

Session 1 - Luminar Basics: How to Accomplish Everyday Tasks

Session 2 - Traditional Techniques in Luminar: Working with Layers, Screens, Blending Modes and More

Session 3 - The New Age of Image Editing: How Luminar's New Tools will Change Your Photography

Plus, we'll provide the latest information about the Skylum Digital Asset Manager, lead Q&A sessions, and share our experiences working with the Skylum team.

If you want to explore the Luminar alternative, then this is an event you don't want to miss.

About the Facilitators

Angela a photographer, blogger, and photography coach living in Chesapeake, VA. She is a working photographer, educator, and works with Skylum, helping to facilitate their community forum. Angela provides both creative and technical support. And she truly understands the Luminar image editing process.

Derrick is a writer, photographer, teacher, and podcaster. You can follow his weekly shows on TheDigitalStory.com, as well as read his blog posts, check out his workshop schedule, and find links to his social accounts, including Instagram (DerrickStory), Twitter (Derrick_Story), and Facebook (thedigitalstory). TheDigitalStory show is also available where ever you download your podcasts. Derrick is the moderator for Skylum's Public Group on Facebook.

Workshop Fee: $69

You can register here at: our workshops page.

Updates and Such

You can become a member of our Inner Circle by clicking on this link or by clicking on the Patreon tile that's on every page of The Digital Story.

B&H and Amazon tiles on www.thedigitalstory. If you click on them first, you're helping to support this podcast. And speaking of supporting this show, and big thanks to our Patreon Inner Circle members:

And finally, be sure to visit our friends at Red River Paper for all of your inkjet supply needs.

See you next week!

More Ways to Participate

Want to share photos and talk with other members in our virtual camera club? Check out our Flickr Public Group. And from those images, I choose the TDS Member Photo of the Day.

Podcast Sponsors

Red River Paper - Keep up with the world of inkjet printing, and win free paper, by liking Red River Paper on Facebook.

Portfoliobox - Create the site that your best images deserve by visiting Portfoliobox. And get a 20 percent discount by using our landing page!

The Nimbleosity Report

Do you want to keep up with the best content from The Digital Story and The Nimble Photographer? Sign up for The Nimbleosity Report, and receive highlights twice-a-month in a single page newsletter. Be a part of our community!

Want to Comment on this Post?

You can share your thoughts at the TDS Facebook page, where I'll post this story for discussion.